Town Square

Post a New Topic

State expands drought emergency to Santa Clara, San Mateo counties

Original post made on Jul 9, 2021

As the drought throughout California deepens, the state announced on Thursday that it is extending its April drought emergency to include additional counties, including San Mateo and Santa Clara, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Friday, July 9, 2021, 6:59 AM

Comments (13)

Posted by Petra Karenter
a resident of Professorville
on Jul 9, 2021 at 2:16 pm

Petra Karenter is a registered user.

Just another reason to RECALL NEWSOM. We have a water reservoir system built for 20 million people and a population twice that. Droughts are a regular feature in California. We should be doing a significantly better job of managing and retaining our water. Lack of leadership on Newsom’s part.


Posted by Marion Harvey
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jul 9, 2021 at 2:50 pm

Marion Harvey is a registered user.

We can't be blaming Gavin Newsom for everything that's gone wrong in California.


Posted by Cyrus Taylor
a resident of Ventura
on Jul 9, 2021 at 3:44 pm

Cyrus Taylor is a registered user.

[Post removed.]


Posted by JB
a resident of Evergreen Park
on Jul 9, 2021 at 4:00 pm

JB is a registered user.

Wow. This is a serious problem. Global warming is real, and our state is being badly affected by it. Meanwhile, Assembly member Marc Berman said recently during his town hall on the drought that we are doing okay with water. This was a misreading of the situation. While the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir is currently not in trouble, many reservoirs in our area are between 25-45% of capacity. Mr. Berman also apparently supports Senate Bill 9, which allows single family homes to be turned into 4 homes on the same lot. He wants denser residential development since he thinks that will allow for fewer water-thirsty lawns and since he believes that these 4-unit lots will create affordable housing. With the high cost of land in Palo Alto, I don't believe that these new developments will be affordable to most people. Of course, more people on one lot will probably use more water than a single family uses. I know this Senate Bill 9 topic is not mentioned in the article, but our current serious drought situation does tie into Senate Bill 9. I hope we all work hard to conserve water and also take a close look at Senate Bill 9 to see how dense residential development on single family lots will not help our drought situation. Thank you.


Posted by Local
a resident of Stanford
on Jul 11, 2021 at 7:45 am

Local is a registered user.

Blame Donald Trump and his cognitively challenged voters. Trump is still claiming this is not climate change and the earth is cooling down. We wasted four years under him doing nothing and this is now costing up.


Posted by Preston Layne
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jul 11, 2021 at 7:53 am

Preston Layne is a registered user.

- Blame Donald Trump and his cognitively challenged voters.

Donald Trump and his supporters can and should be held accountable for a number of improprieties but you cannot blame them for global warming.

When it comes to the proliferation of unchecked industrially discharged CO2 along with the origins of the coronavirus, all fingers point to the PRC.


Posted by Loretta
a resident of another community
on Jul 11, 2021 at 10:13 am

Loretta is a registered user.

We are trying to conserve water by taking fewer showers per week (2) and reducing our washloads by only laundering most clothing (including towels and bed linens) after three weeks of consecutive use.

By turning one's underwear inside out and wearing it a second day you can also double their usage while using less water for unecessary laundering.

The cars have remained unwashed for most of a year (going on two) and washing our kitchen utensils is kept to an absolute minimum.

We simply wipe-clean our cast iron skillet and dutch ovens and use wooden plates and spoons which can be easily cleansed with sand and a damp rag.

Much of our water conservation measures are being taken because we are opting to use the water to irrigate of an ongoing cash crop which is our primary source of income.


Posted by Anneke
a resident of Professorville
on Jul 12, 2021 at 12:52 pm

Anneke is a registered user.

We have a long coast line, and we need to start building desalination plants, and I believe we recently received some funding to start that project.

To Loretta: I cannot help myself, but I have to tell you a joke from WWII. Soldiers from the US, UK and Germany were all told by their leadership to slow down their changes of underwear:

1. US leadership told the soldiers to change to once a week.
2. British leadership informed their soldiers to change to once a month
3. And the German leadership instructed their soldiers to change their underwear with each other.


Posted by Consider Your Options.
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 12, 2021 at 1:15 pm

Consider Your Options. is a registered user.

We just drove home from vacation in Oregon where we expeperienced the horrifying heat dome, a weather event that is supposed to be a once-in-a-thousand-years phenomenon. It was terrible to watch the upper stories of trees scorch over three days. Green leaves turned yellow and red, then dark and crusty, falling like ash to the ground. Crops withered. It was awful to be outside in 113 degree heat. Walking out the door felt like walking into a blast furnace.

We drove home on Sunday. We were shocked to see Lake Shasta nearly empty. Mt. Shasta, usually snow-capped even at this time of year, had very little snow left, and it was on fire. Smoke filled the skies for miles. As we drove through central California temperatures soared. Central CA is now experiencing a heat dome like the one we experienced in Portland. In the news there, reports say that field workers cannot work through the day any more. It is physically impossible in the heat.

Climate change is real and it is escalating now. This is not a normal California drought. While Palo Alto temps are more comfortable, this change is affecting the whole west. We are not immune to the effects on areas that provide our food and water.

We each need to change the way we are living to reduce our carbon footprints. This isn't just bout leadership and devleopment pressure. This problem will req


Posted by Consider Your Options.
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 12, 2021 at 1:23 pm

Consider Your Options. is a registered user.

We just drove home from vacation in Oregon where we experienced the horrifying heat dome, a weather event that is supposed to be a once-in-a-thousand-years phenomenon that shattered historical heat records. It was terrible to watch the upper stories of trees scorch over three days. Green leaves turned yellow and red, then dark and crusty, falling like ash to the ground. Crops withered. It was awful to be outside in 113 degree heat. Walking out the door felt like walking into a blast furnace.

We drove home on Sunday. We were shocked to see Lake Shasta nearly empty. Mt. Shasta, usually snow-capped even at this time of year, had very little snow left, and it was on fire. Smoke filled the skies for miles. As we traveled through central California, temperatures soared. Central CA was experiencing a heat dome like the one we experienced in Portland. In the news there, reports say that field workers cannot work through the day any more. It is physically impossible in the heat--up to 114 degrees.

Climate change is real and it is escalating now. This is not a normal California drought. While Palo Alto temps are more comfortable, this change is affecting the whole west. Palo Alto, though we are somewhat protected by coastal breezes, is not immune to the effects on areas that provide food and water to us and other parts of the sate and nation. Let's all do everything we can as citizens to reduce our carbon footprints to maintain a livable planet and a vibrant nation.


Posted by Rhodoreae
a resident of Ventura
on Jul 12, 2021 at 8:30 pm

Rhodoreae is a registered user.

We use about 50 gallons per day per person to meet our total water needs.

We have a hot water recirculation pump and a laundry to landscape greywater system.

Our garden is mostly CA natives but we do water the vegetable garden, fruit trees and our thirsty mature redwood so it won't die.

Not sure how much more we can reduce but we'll continue to try.


Posted by Consider Your Options.
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 13, 2021 at 12:26 pm

Consider Your Options. is a registered user.

It's not just about reducing water use...It is also about reducing the greenhouse gas emissions we each create which is the root cause.

Each of us, every human on the planet, must help. Create smaller families, plant trees, reduce GHGs by switching to less carbon intensive modes of transportation and energy sources, using less stuff and choosing to buy, build and manufacture things that last longer.

Good read: Bill Gates book How To Avoid A Climate Disaster A primer and a plan. I don't agree with everything he says, but it helps us wrap our heads around the fundamental problems and start identifying a hopeful path toward action, rather than feeling overwhelmed.


Posted by eileen
a resident of College Terrace
on Jul 14, 2021 at 10:54 am

eileen is a registered user.

FYI,
"Almonds alone use about 10 percent of California’s total water supply each year. That’s nuts. But almonds are also the state’s most lucrative exported agricultural product, with California producing 80 percent of the world’s supply. Alfalfa hay requires even more water, about 15 percent of the state’s supply. About 70 percent of alfalfa grown in California is used in dairies, and a good portion of the rest is exported to land-poor Asian countries like Japan. Yep, that’s right: In the middle of a drought, farmers are shipping fresh hay across the Pacific Ocean. The water that’s locked up in exported hay amounts to about 100 billion gallons per year—enough to supply 1 million families with drinking water for a year." Maybe we should stop exporting so many almonds and alfalfa?


Don't miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.

Email:


Post a comment

In order to encourage respectful and thoughtful discussion, commenting on stories is available to those who are registered users. If you are already a registered user and the commenting form is not below, you need to log in. If you are not registered, you can do so here.

Please make sure your comments are truthful, on-topic and do not disrespect another poster. Don't be snarky or belittling. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

See our announcement about requiring registration for commenting.

Stay informed.

Get the day's top headlines from Palo Alto Online sent to your inbox for free.

Craving a two-foot pizza? Pizzone serves Milan-style magic in Palo Alto.
By The Peninsula Foodist | 2 comments | 6,381 views

PA's downtown business problems not simple to solve
By Diana Diamond | 5 comments | 5,350 views

"It's too little too late" and other reasons why not
By Sherry Listgarten | 13 comments | 4,373 views

Recall Election Reform: Forgetting that the talking points were only that
By Douglas Moran | 12 comments | 2,926 views

Couples and Premarital: Parallel Living: What to Do
By Chandrama Anderson | 0 comments | 2,591 views