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Massive march for change calls attention to racism in Palo Alto area

Original post made on Jun 7, 2020

Thousands of protesters flocked to Palo Alto City Hall on Saturday, where leaders, parents and youth grabbed onto the momentum of what's now a global movement of protests in order to call out harmful police policies and local racism.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Sunday, June 7, 2020, 12:23 AM

Comments (67)

22 people like this
Posted by Mitchell Zimmerman
a resident of Green Acres
on Jun 7, 2020 at 6:54 am

To learn more about the 8 policies on police use of force which can safely and dramatically reduce unnecessary police violence, go to 8cantwait.org. Our city should adopt ALL of these policies.


29 people like this
Posted by Mary
a resident of Fairmeadow
on Jun 7, 2020 at 8:03 am

"Hundreds of protesters" in a city with 60,000 people, and a surrounding area of many more times that, is called a "massive" march in the headline? Hmmm.


45 people like this
Posted by Walter McMillan
a resident of Los Altos
on Jun 7, 2020 at 8:28 am

We said -> black lives matter
NEVER said -> only black lives matter
We know -> All lives matter
We just need YOUR HELP with #blacklivesmatter because BLACK LIVES are in DANGER.

Thank You


13 people like this
Posted by ReallyLiveHere
a resident of Fairmeadow
on Jun 7, 2020 at 8:36 am

Steven Lee, the Palo Alto Human Rights Commissioner is pushing the 8-can't-wait things via Facebook ads promoting this post:

Web Link

These measures are a start; they can reduce the use of deadly force by police, but they're also not enough. The PAPD has a long history of hassling minorities, running them out of town, and the 8-can't-wait policies won't end that. Firing the chief a few years back didn't end it.

We are going to need to make large budget cuts this year, and I urge city council to balance the budget by cutting police, not firefighers or community programs, and to have the remaining resume tracking racial data on traffic stops.

Join me in commenting at the city council meeting on Monday evening:
Web Link


50 people like this
Posted by F.R
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Jun 7, 2020 at 8:56 am

I attended the protest, it was not hundreds, it was at least 2000-3000 people if not more. I stood on the street facing the city hall and on that street alone were at least 500 people. all the surrounding streets facing the city hall was packed. The plaza itself was full. I didn’t go for the march so maybe the march was a few hundred.


8 people like this
Posted by Lloyd
a resident of another community
on Jun 7, 2020 at 9:50 am

Hi F.R., thank you for reading and pointing that out. I've made the correction to better reflect the number of people that attended the protest.

-Lloyd


12 people like this
Posted by Largest protest in PA history!
a resident of Community Center
on Jun 7, 2020 at 10:11 am

Some say 10,000 gathered. One race, the human race! Love seeing the whole world coming together because of BLM. K-pop band BTS donated $1,000,000 to BLM movement. WONDERFUL!


66 people like this
Posted by Nayeli
a resident of Midtown
on Jun 7, 2020 at 10:16 am

Walter: Thank you for sharing your point. I have never had a problem with the term "Black Lives Matter" unless it is used by a very small few who associate it with the specific policy goals of groups that took the term as a name for their groups.

However, I was wondering if can you point me to the statistics used to validate the claim that black lives are in danger (apparently more so than Hispanic, Asian, Pacific Islander or White lives)?

Sometimes, statistics can be misleading. For instance, the man with the poster arguing "81% more racial bias than 81% of California police departments" didn't cite his claims either. I can't seem to find any actual evidence for the claim.

According to "Campaign Zero" (an organization that tasks itself with ending police brutality), Palo Alto is actually rated as "average" when it comes to such things.

In fact, Campaign Zero's research found that Palo Alto was one of just eleven police departments that did not use deadly force for the three-year study period (2016, 2017 and 2018). Moreover, while 22% of the arrests were African American (with no violence used during those arrests), the study found that at least 91% of complaints and allegations were sustained.

This simply reveals the math that shows that a higher rate of African Americans come into Palo Alto and commit crimes. This probably has less to do with "race" and more to do with "wealth" (in Palo Alto -- making it a target from outsiders of all races).

Racial disparity (particularly among African Americans) is something common throughout California -- but aligns with both state and national crime statistics. Given the PAPD's high accountability rate (in which the study showed that most complaints and allegations are sustained), this means that the PAPD are doing their job quite well.

As such, the only "below average" mark left in the study of the Palo Alto Police Department is in regard to "over-policing" -- which they define as a misdemeanor arrest record. However, this doesn't mean that this is "bad." Misdemeanors are still crimes. In fact, I want the PAPD to find and arrest someone who steals or destroys property. This is supposed to be a deterrent to others who might consider committing criminal activity in Palo Alto.

Black lives matter. This is absolutely true. They should matter! Thankfully, I have never met anyone who thought otherwise in the states and areas that I have lived. I suppose that I have been lucky in this.

Every life is precious -- including those who have engaged in crime. It doesn't matter if George Floyd had a criminal record (or even a violent criminal record), the police involved in that instance were absolutely wrong.

I just wonder if the better policy goal should be more than non-cited claims (such as stating that "black lives are in danger" more than other racial-ethnic groups) or merely generalizing police as being motivated by race rather than doing their jobs.

A bad cop is a bad cop. However, the overwhelming majority of cops do a difficult and often thankless job with sincerity. Their lives matter too. In this case, I think that PAPD is exemplary.

I do think that a good goal would be to pressure the STATE (and not local or even federal governments) to implement a non-violence policy for non-violent offenders. If a suspect is a non-violent offender, has no record of violence or is handcuffed, then there is no need for a cop to place his/her knee on that man's neck. There is no need to throw someone to the ground.

I think that this would go a long way toward solving such issues. I would add police cameras to every officer on patrol too. This can add quite a bit of clarity to situations -- and reveal more about each case in question. It might be costly -- but the value of a human life and reputation makes such costs worth it.


18 people like this
Posted by Nayeli
a resident of Midtown
on Jun 7, 2020 at 10:17 am

Here is the link to Campaign Zero's website for Palo Alto:

Web Link


17 people like this
Posted by suzanne
a resident of Menlo Park
on Jun 7, 2020 at 10:27 am

To Mary from Fairmeadow, if you had shown up and supported your community, you would have seen that it was 1000's, not hundreds. And why didn't you come out with your friends and family? It is incredibly important, that we support ALL members of our community and speak up for racial injustice. Your comment just shows us all that you are part of the problem. Next time come out and support your community, nobody should stay in the background while racial injustice exists in our community, our state, and our country.


30 people like this
Posted by Rick P
a resident of Fairmeadow
on Jun 7, 2020 at 11:08 am

There were many more black families as well as white in Palo Alto when I was growing up here in the 60's and 70's. Many people opted to sell at different times as property values here keep rising. Most of my newer nieghbors are from other countries and are catagorized as niether black nor white. My family bought our house in Palo Alto for just under $30.000 in 1968. I spoke with a man on Bryant st. a couple of monhts ago, close to E.meadow who sold his modest house for 2.6 million, cash deal, closed in 10 days. Renting here also costs a small fortune these days. You really have to be making good money or, already be very well off to buy in here if you'er not already established. Talking to old friends who's parents sold or, they sold after their parents passed say "once you leave you cant come back"


12 people like this
Posted by parent
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jun 7, 2020 at 11:26 am

Considering that there were large rallies all over the Bay Area yesterday, I think the local turnout of mostly people who live within walking distance was great.


11 people like this
Posted by Online Name
a resident of Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jun 7, 2020 at 12:14 pm

The photos of the PA march and protest start at #10 in the link below and do a nice job of showing the size of the crowd.
Web Link


22 people like this
Posted by another parent
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jun 7, 2020 at 12:15 pm

I've lived here for 25 years and have never seen people turn out like they did yesterday. Excellent start, so let's keep it up!


9 people like this
Posted by Conspicuous By Their Absence
a resident of Ventura
on Jun 7, 2020 at 12:21 pm

We're there any members of the PAPD in attendance to actively join in on the protest?

Didn't think so...if anything, they were probably somewhere in the background for crowd control and/or arrests.


4 people like this
Posted by Sheree Bradshaw
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Jun 7, 2020 at 12:27 pm

Would like to know when's the next March in Palo Alto, East Palo Alto


10 people like this
Posted by Joe
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 7, 2020 at 12:33 pm

@ Mitchell Zimmerman,
Web Link
the City will make some disingenuous resolutions and fraudulent reforms to deceive the public but in the end law enforcement will continue to deprive people of their rights especially black, brown minorities and the poor, for if they truly wanted reform they would holding their corrupt officers accountable right now and the fact they are not reveals that they playing a con game, a "ruse" in their own words. Proof: Web Link


11 people like this
Posted by Sam
a resident of Green Acres
on Jun 7, 2020 at 12:46 pm

So the person writing the article first said "hundreds" attended, which was probably too low, especially since he also said "massive protest." Then a commenter said "it was at least 2000-3000 people" and he changes it to "thousands." That's how articles are written here, and how crowd estimates are made for these articles?


5 people like this
Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jun 7, 2020 at 12:48 pm

Historical note - During WW2 and the aftermath of rebuilding we had a vast array of businesses in the building trades and defense systems. The ports had ship building, train building, home building. For some reason manufacturing has moved out - in part due to the high taxes and very strict requirements on manufacturing. The Space products were discontinued and a lot of diversity in that area. California has made some choices to narrow the type of businesses that occupy space here. And look at the comments regarding Tesla - a car manufacturing plant. As you narrow the choice of businesses and bring in other nationals to do that work then there you are. CA is digging it's own predicament.


Like this comment
Posted by Lloyd
a resident of another community
on Jun 7, 2020 at 1:11 pm

Hi Sam,
Thank you for reading! The crowd estimate is based on attending the protest, comparing previous protests such as the East Palo Alto protest which drew around 500+ people, the fact that the over four-mile march created a line of protesters well over a mile long, other reports of Saturday's numbers, and, of course, our watchful readers who are correct to point out mistakes when they are there.

-Lloyd


41 people like this
Posted by Covid?
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jun 7, 2020 at 1:20 pm

Well I guess we can put to rest the hysteria about Covid spreading, city and local officials turning their eyes away from demonstrations that flaunt the county health directives. Meanwhile people in SCC still can’t enter houses of worship. So mass protests ok, but going to church isn’t .


14 people like this
Posted by Online Name
a resident of Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jun 7, 2020 at 1:27 pm

@Covid, there was a lot of social distancing. We were standing in the middle of Hamilton well-separated from those around us which made it impossible to hear the speakers because the city didn't set up speakers and/or the microphones on loud enough. People were also spread out on the streets parallel to the City Hall. I can't remember seeing anyone without a mask.

Still very gratifying to see the thousands of people, esp. since for big events like the Women's March you had to go to either Redwood City, San Francisco or San Jose.

I didn't happen to see any of the PA join the protest or take a knee; they were mainly outside the street barricades. Anyone else?


20 people like this
Posted by ALB
a resident of College Terrace
on Jun 7, 2020 at 1:31 pm

I fail to understand why Mayor Fine said, "The council will debate Black Lives Matter at the upcoming meeting" when he addressed the protesters at the well attended rally yesterday. He was heckled because of the outrageous ten-day curfew. We need someone with emotional intelligence, compassion to be our mayor. I want Tom DuBois to be the mayor as he is thoughtful and cares about the constituents' issues. Vice Mayor DuBois would have never said DEBATE Black Lives Matter as a future agenda item. Clearly, Mayor Fine is clueless. He doesn't get it.


35 people like this
Posted by Covid?
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jun 7, 2020 at 1:33 pm

I didn’t say that people weren’t social distancing or not wearing masks. My point was SCC health directives don’t allow for large gatherings. What’s the point of having them if city officials ignore them. Meanwhile churches remain closed , why can’t church goers be given guidelines to reopen if you let thousands congregate at protests


48 people like this
Posted by Jake
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 7, 2020 at 1:42 pm

So it's a violation for business to open, but okay for massive crowd gathering together?
Talking about double standard!


Like this comment
Posted by Lindsay
a resident of Ventura
on Jun 7, 2020 at 2:03 pm

Nayeli: The police scorecard mentioned in the article has the "81% racial bias in arrests and deadly force" statistics. Web Link


21 people like this
Posted by Nayeli
a resident of Midtown
on Jun 7, 2020 at 4:52 pm

@Lindsay: Thanks. Now, I knew that this number is listed in small print. However, there is no viable methodology accompanying that claim (or used via comparison and contrast) via Campaign Zero.

In fact, whereas Campaign Zero assigns Palo Alto a grade of "C" (average - 73%), Richmond, California is assigned a failing "F" grade -- 9%. Yet, that same "more racial bias" figure for Richmond is actually lower (80% versus 81%).

The point that I was making is that the statistics are somewhat misleading because more arrests of African Americans in Palo Alto might seem to indicate "racial bias" when it simply means that more African American and Hispanic American individuals who aren't from Palo Alto come here and commit crimes.

This is why the "81%" claim (especially on the poster held by a man in one of the photographs) makes no sense. It is implying that the Palo Alto Police Department is engaged in systemic racial bias despite the statistics that say otherwise.

I think that this is what seems confusing. Palo Alto's residential demographics has a lower-than-average number of African American and Hispanic American residents. However, this also leads to a much higher ratio of arrests for criminal activity -- since a disproportionate number of individuals who have committed crimes in Palo Alto are African American and Hispanic American non-residents.

In this sense, the numbers are quite academic or clinical -- not supposing toward racial "bias" by police officers but simply reflecting the realities of crime in this city. So, I just think that the sign held by this one man was quite misleading (at best).

The Palo Alto Police Department is exemplary in this regard. There is always the possibility of a "bad cop" being hired or, more often, a good cop who makes a bad decision. However, the cops here are well-trained, professional and, statistically-speaking, very accurate when it comes to arrests.


51 people like this
Posted by The Truth
a resident of Palo Alto High School
on Jun 7, 2020 at 4:53 pm

And exactly HOW does protesting, looting, rioting, and blocking highways help the blacks earn respect? How about donating your time to them such as tutoring the children, mentoring them, keeping them in school, teaching them sex ed so they don't produce children in their teen years, teaching them strong work ethic instead of victimizing themselves and joining gangs and criminal activity? Oh, too much work? Do you really care, then? It's easier to just go out and shout. This has become peer pressure so those who don't protest are considered racists. Too bad the far left overused the word, it is no longer an insult to call someone a racist, it has evolved into a word that means nothing but a simple verbal attack such as calling someone dumb. We are all numb to the word, "racist" because AOC and her lefties threw it around recklessly.

Is affirmative action fair? Hire the less qualified person for diversity sake? Isn't that racism? Doesn't this hurt the blacks who are successful by their own merit? People should help the black subculture become qualified. The Democrats would prefer to throw them welfare to keep them segregated. Even Obama didn't help the blacks as he campaigned that he would. Meanwhile, our Republican president has helped blacks more, reforming prison laws, raising black employment.

Racism will never end, it will just be silenced but actions speak louder than words. I'm hoping the blacks improve their lives and earn respect. Do people care enough to actually help them?


36 people like this
Posted by Truth
a resident of Palo Alto High School
on Jun 7, 2020 at 4:59 pm

The statistics state that more whites are killed by police than blacks. In 2020, 172 whites, 88 blacks. Since 2017, the number of whites killed by police outnumbered the number of blacks by a LARGE amount: Web Link But the media doesn't publicize this. The media is so biased, it's ridiculous.


7 people like this
Posted by Mark Weiss
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 7, 2020 at 5:59 pm

If it’s the same rally I went to, there were 5,000 people. I couldn’t get close enough to actually hear or see the speakers.


15 people like this
Posted by Mark Weiss
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 7, 2020 at 6:03 pm

Adrian Fine should be debating whether to resign.


3 people like this
Posted by Mark Weiss
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 7, 2020 at 6:45 pm

[Post removed.]


18 people like this
Posted by John
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 7, 2020 at 7:03 pm

“Cordell, a former Palo Alto City Council member, seized the moment to tell a crowd of mostly young protesters to vote President Donald Trump out of the White House.“
I can’t believe anyone would hijack this respectful event for a political gain. I am glad that he’s out.


Like this comment
Posted by Bart Anderson
a resident of Mayfield
on Jun 7, 2020 at 7:36 pm

Coming to terms with our history of racism - it's long overdue.
It's not easy to admit what went on in our own backyard, but to be responsible adults we need to understand and make amends.
Web Link


Like this comment
Posted by Katherine
a resident of Portola Valley
on Jun 7, 2020 at 8:11 pm

@Nayeli --
The methodology + raw data for calculating the racial bias in the PAPD's arrest record (more racial bias than 81% of the other 100 largest California departments) is linked to on the Police Scorecard site you're looking at. The creators posted it on Github for full transparency. Here's a direct link for your convenience: Web Link

The Stanford Open Policing Project found similar results at a national level in their analysis of traffic stops and subsequent searches for contraband. The authors allow that police interactions are complex, but a statistical analysis of the data does suggest discrimination: "When we apply the threshold test to our traffic stop data, we find that police require less suspicion to search black and Hispanic drivers than white drivers. This double standard is evidence of discrimination." That methodology is walked through here, with links to the full academic paper and raw data:
Web Link


7 people like this
Posted by Michael O.
a resident of Stanford
on Jun 7, 2020 at 8:36 pm

To COVID? No one is stopping your church from meeting outside, physically distanced, with masks. Go for it. I don't see any photos of protestors meeting in buildings. Do you? Read the county order again.

To Mary of Fairmeadow: Count the people in this photo: Web Link


23 people like this
Posted by Jennifer
a resident of another community
on Jun 7, 2020 at 9:13 pm

I understand their message... racial equality. What they don't get is their approach (rioting, looting, etc.) will cause society to lose respect. They either don't get it or they don't care. Or both. How sad. If only all protests could be peaceful.


5 people like this
Posted by Stephen
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Jun 7, 2020 at 9:42 pm

Truth @ Palo Alto High School - A bit of a clarification: yes, while in 2020 there have been approximately 2x police killings of whites compared to African Americans, there are 5x as many white people as African Americans. Thus African Americans have 2.5 x the mortality due to the police as do whites.


2 people like this
Posted by Josh
a resident of Barron Park
on Jun 7, 2020 at 9:49 pm

What does “othered” mean? I’ve never seen that before.


24 people like this
Posted by Jennifer
a resident of another community
on Jun 7, 2020 at 9:57 pm

Stephen - You're correct that whites outnumber blacks by a long shot, but blacks also commit a much higher percentage of crimes per capita. Taking that into consideration, I can't help but wonder if whites and blacks are victimized at the same rate. The difference is whites don't suffer racism like blacks, won't take it as racism, and the media will give no attention to white on white police brutality. Hmm.


18 people like this
Posted by Blue collar
a resident of another community
on Jun 7, 2020 at 10:09 pm

@ Jenifer

"The difference is whites don't suffer racism like blacks,"

Obviously you have not worked on a construction site.


20 people like this
Posted by Nayeli
a resident of Midtown
on Jun 7, 2020 at 10:12 pm

@ Katherine: Again, thank you for the links. However, I've looked over all of the data from Campaign Zero. I probably should have been a bit more clear about that (especially since I brought up their website and findings in the first place).

So, the organization's conclusion -- as a footnote -- is that Palo Alto (despite being rated "average" for the state) has "more racial bias in arrests and deadly force than 81% of the California police departments."

My point is that the statistical data might be correct but the statistical data can be misleading. How so?

First of all, there were ZERO individuals of any race who were killed or seriously injured by the PAPD for the years 2016, 2017 and 2018 (the years of the study).

Secondly, there is faulty amalgamation between the terms "reported crimes," "arrests" and "biases." Just because people are arrested, it doesn't mean that there is racial "bias."

The demographics of Palo Alto lean heavily toward anglo and Asian Americans. In fact, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, Palo Alto is 88.7% white (non-Hispanic) and Asian. African Americans are just 1.6% of the population. Hispanic Americans (like me) are 5.7% of Palo Alto's population. An additional 4.6% of the population is biracial -- a combination of any two racial-ethnic groups.

Web Link

Why is the rate of arrest higher for African Americans and Hispanic Americans?

Well, we have a smaller residential population in this city. However, our "daytime" population is much higher -- and it is comprised of people working in the city's many white collar jobs AND the many other workers who are present during the day.

According to the City of Palo Alto, the population of Palo Alto is just slightly over 67,000. However, the daytime population of Palo Alto (including Stanford) is more than 160,000. This includes the number of residents who don't work in Palo Alto but, rather, go outside the city during the day.

Web Link

So, on any given day, the number of African Americans and Hispanic Americans in Palo Alto is considerably higher. At even the average crime/arrest rate by demographics for the state, it would seemingly create disparity.

That "average" rate is also something that has to be considered. I'm Hispanic American. I am keenly aware that my ethnic group commits crime at a higher rate than white Americans and Asian Americans. The same can be said of African Americans (at an even higher rate).

Obviously, there is room for civil discussion as for the reasons why. It isn't helpful to simply insinuate racial bias. In the case of Palo Alto, Campaign Zero already pointed out that at least 91% of the complaints and criminal allegations are sustained. Thus, most of the arrests are not actually based upon bias by the police or individuals making the complaints/allegations.

Web Link

So, I think that we can readily agree when the math (in terms of crime statistics) is sound. The issue is with determining whether or not there is some sort of intrinsic systemic racial bias with the Palo Alto Police Department. I reject the notion based upon what I have read.

For one, the statistics don't cover biases. They cover complaints, criminal allegations and arrests. They also cover violence in apprehension. For the latter, Palo Alto had none over the course of this study. For the former, the evidence seems to indicate that most of the complaints/allegations were sustained.

The issue is that any disparity in arrests does not take into account the differences between the daytime and nighttime populations. Moreover, any disparity in those statistics shouldn't be assigned with insinuations of racial BIAS. If more Hispanic men between the ages of 18-35 are committing crimes in the city limits, then more Hispanic men between the ages of 18-35 will be the targets of criminal complaints and/or arrests. The same is true of any group.

Does this make any sense?

My problem is that the man in the photograph was holding up a sign that was alleging some sort of intrinsic and systemic racial bias with the Palo Alto Police Department. The sign ignored the actual "grade" from Campaign Zero as well as the fact that our stated "Racial Bias in Arrests and Deadly Force" is virtually identical to many cities graded "failing" that have much higher ratios of Hispanic and African Americans.

Personally, I think that the PAPD is doing a fantastic job. I think that they could be a model for other police departments around the state.

At the same time, I do think that a better goals for curbing violence in arrests. Some people are demanding that police departments receive sizable cuts in their budgets. Other groups are demanding that cops be removed from public schools (particularly those who have a record of violence). These are counterproductive (in my opinion).

Like I wrote earlier, I believe that a state law guiding law enforcement (in terms of how non-violent suspects are apprehended) is vital. The federal government has little say over the policies of local or state law enforcement policies. If a suspect is not deemed a threat, then why apprehend them like they are potential violent threats? The state should ban choke holds, knees to the neck, throwing people to the ground, etc. -- when the suspect is not a threat. To monitor this, the state should require that police departments utilize body cameras at all times.

Now, I do realize that this might be frustrating to some law enforcement. You only have to watch Live PD a few times to see how antagonistic and non-complying some suspects can be. Many refuse to listen to commands during arrests -- which leads to escalations. I think that this needs to be studied so that more viable ways to arrest individuals who are non-complying without resorting to violence.

What happened to George Floyd should NEVER have happened. It was wrong. It should be prevented going forward.


12 people like this
Posted by Pat
a resident of College Terrace
on Jun 7, 2020 at 11:26 pm

Those who believe in Constitutional Rights for themselves and their friends while denying those rights to others do not believe in the Constitution. Those who deny equal protection of the law to certain people in order to protect their friends in law enforcement from being held accountable when they have violated the Constitution and while denying equal protection of the law to those whom they dislike, hate; even criminals, have eviscerated the Constitution rendering it meaningless. These people spout off at the mouth about how patriotic they are, but in reality they are phonies and con men; betrayers of the Constitution and the Freedoms it is supposed to guarantee. There are people who have spoken out for the rights of BLM but have done so for the sole purpose of self promotion because they turn around and deny equal protection of the law to those whom they hate. "Guard against the impostures of pretended patriotism." George Washington


10 people like this
Posted by Pat
a resident of College Terrace
on Jun 7, 2020 at 11:29 pm

In fact there are even people in these comments above and cited in the article who are deceiving you with their public pronouncements but in reality hate the Constitution and equal protection of the law.


9 people like this
Posted by Protest Organizer
a resident of Palo Alto Hills
on Jun 8, 2020 at 2:52 am

@The Truth: "The blacks" told me everything I need to know about you. If you had a basic conception of the U.S. Constitution or International human rights law, you would know that African-Americans' rights not to be extrajudicially murdered by apparatuses of state power are wholly divorced from the issue of "respect" as you put it; they do however have everything to do with African-Americans' legally prescribed rights as citizens and humans.

We do not protest to ask for anything, but solely to show that our community and the constituents it encompasses demand that the principles governing due process and Right to life codified into law since this country's inception be upheld institutionally and individually by those it designates as the arbiters of safety, life and death for its people. Frankly, I think I speak for more people than just myself when I say that we could not care less that you think African Americans’ existential rights should be circumscribed around your notions of respect, or any other arbitrary factor for that matter.


1 person likes this
Posted by Mark Weiss
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 8, 2020 at 6:45 am

(Eleven hours later, kind of reminds me of the joke when I was a kid about Gilligan and Ginger and Gilligan asks if he can stick his finger in her belly button and she says "If Black Lives Matter"..)
I saw the mayor of Palo Alto speak Saturday. Not really, I got there too late to see the podium. I could barely hear the speakers. There were 10,000 people at Hamilton and Ramona, 250 Hamilton. I taped the mayor’s speech, using my smart phone, but I have not tried to listen to it. A friend of mine texted me that he was pretty bad. I said “Who is speaking?” And then “Adrian?” and then recognized his voice, barely. After a while people started chanting “De-fund Po-lice” Defund the police. They weren’t really shouting him down they just weren’t sure if he was still speaking. Maybe he was the guy who was about to announce the next band.
If I ever get the chance to speak to 10,000 of my fellow citizens. I would go, ad lib, like I’m doing here “Hello, Palo Alto! It is so good to see you. I recognize some of you, but I love all of you! Black lives matter! BLACK LIVES MATTER! MALCOLM X! YEAH! LADORIS CORDELL, YEAH! FRANK WILDERSON! (he'a an author, new book) YEAH! ANGELA DAVIS DOUBLE YEAH! GEORGE FLOYD! SAY HIS NAME!”
Something like that.

My friend said that Adrian Fine, a 35-year old Gunn grad and former Planning Commissioner chosen by his peers as the buck-stops-here-only-one-year mayor, instead said something about City Council will “debate black lives matter”. What could that mean? Debate? black lives matter, Black Lives Matter. The people have spoken. There is no debate. People could die while the bureaucracy debates.
Was he referencing the “Resolution” he will read to an empty chamber Monday night? It’s pretty good. It’s better that the “message of hope” that the city sent out the other day. But I wonder who wrote it. It’s not as good as what I just wrote, off the top of my head. It looks like something someone faxed us from another city. (OK, two drafts, this, but you get my drift).

I am thinking about a movie I liked as a kid, I saw on tv. It was a World War II movie, in the Pacific. A mix of comedy and suspense. A small boat with an iconoclast captain, maybe William Holden. It was not I don’t think “McHale’s Navy”. It was more serious that that, the movie.
There’s a scene I remember where they get a message:
YOU ARE IN A FINE AREA.
The captain is puzzled. He says “What are we, The PTA? (Parent Teacher association).
Someone speaks up: “Mine” not “fine”. Explosives. Danger.

Or as Mark Twain once said: the difference between having a Mayor of Palo Alto who can (find the right words, at once in a lifetime event) and having a mayor who is not sure if black? lives? matter? is the difference between life and death, Democracy and Fascism, you Clydesdale led to proberbial fountain of wisdom but read the label did not inhale.
Drop the mic, Adrian “fine”.
Maybe now is good time to resign from public service and work full time for large corporate day job.
Very dramatic would be to do so tonite. Waiting until closer to the election weakens it.


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Posted by Mark Weiss
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 8, 2020 at 6:54 am

[Post removed.]


31 people like this
Posted by Courtney
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 8, 2020 at 8:23 am

Why do black lives only seem to matter when killed by white police officers? What happened is a disgrace and the police responsible should get the worst possible outcome for them. I was sickened and appalled as I was many times before. But we need to be United and fight for the same thing and condemn the same things.
1. Why dont black lives matter and the black criminals get called out by the BLM movement and when a black person murders another black person. No one ever seems to mention these black lives. The dead doesn't matter and the killer is not even mentioned.
2. Why don't BLM call out the looters and violent protesters and distance the movement from them people and say what they are doing is wrong.
3. How is defunding the police going to help Americans at all regardless of color.
4. All lives matter is correct. But what we need to educate people on is that black lives matter too. It's not about white lives. Asian lives etc not mattering. It's about don't forget that black peoples lives matter just as much as everyone else.

There is a fight against racism and discrimination. By why cant we all fight on the same side. Inclusive of all exclusive of non


6 people like this
Posted by Jennifer
a resident of another community
on Jun 8, 2020 at 8:29 am

Blue Collar - Any race can suffer from racism, but whites aren't oppressed like minorities. And, no I've never worked construction. If you're uncomfortable with your co-workers, only you can decide where you work.


4 people like this
Posted by Tyler
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Jun 8, 2020 at 9:09 am

@ Mark Weis, Who are you to talk. I've seen your posts before always defending illegal acts by police like the time that a palo alto cop beat some suspect in his own driveway in clear violation of law. You pick and choose who the law will be enforced upon based upon your own dictates. You don't believe in the rule of law or the rights for all just for those you like based upon your own bias and prejudice, like a lot of police officers whom the people were protesting against.


7 people like this
Posted by Carolyn
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 8, 2020 at 9:33 am

So we marched. Now what? Unless you support affordable and dense housing providing opportunities for all in our community, this protest is meaningless. I wonder how many of the 10,000 here have voted against or spoken against affordable and dense housing projects in Palo Alto. It is tough when the rubber meets the road for these rich white folks.


Posted by Mark Weiss
a resident of Downtown North

on Jun 8, 2020 at 10:14 am

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20 people like this
Posted by Tony Favero
a resident of another community
on Jun 8, 2020 at 10:26 am

Interesting....Yes, all lives matter of course. One man is hideously murdered and the country goes crazy. Yes, it was horrible what happened to George Floyd.....but each week many young black people are killed in the streets of Chicago, Detroit, etc., etc. and no one seems to really give a good damn about it. So now the Einsteins of the left now want to be rid of police? If you abhor the egregious murders in all of our major cities now, well Sherlock, hang on to your hats, but its about to get much worse when you remove the police. And when you're in need of dire assistance......who ya gonna call? Ghost Busters?


4 people like this
Posted by Skeptical
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 8, 2020 at 11:14 am

The article says:
>"8 Can't Wait" policies; the Palo Alto Police Department follows two of them: requiring a warning before shooting

In split-second decisions with an armed assailant, requiring a warning would mean the cop's life is in danger, right? We actually think a cop's decision in these matters is to be trusted less than an armed assailant's decision?

Weep when you witness the naivete (stupidity?) of the SJ community organizer who ignored several warnings from police when stepping into their line of fire. How would the above policy help with that? According to the Merc:

[[
“I stepped into the line of fire, and a couple of cops said, ‘Move.’ I said, with my hands up, ‘I can’t do that, please don’t do this,'” Sanderlin said. “Another cop came up behind them, pointed directly at me, and said, ‘Move.'”
Sanderlin stood his ground.
“He said, ‘You’re not gonna move?’ I shook my head, held my sign over my chest, and thought, ‘I really hope this guy doesn’t shoot me,'” Sanderlin said. “He fired off a rubber bullet
]]

If this isn't provocation and agitation, I don't know what is. He says he’s a peacekeeper, but apparently wants to be the sacrifical lamb. And this not even from a criminal. I’m just so confused. The police are supposed to have therapy sessions with each and every person who intentionally and repeatedly disobeys their orders at a time of vast civil unrest?


11 people like this
Posted by Fr0hickey
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jun 8, 2020 at 12:32 pm

@Blue Collar
@Jennifer

"The difference is whites don't suffer racism like blacks,"

Obviously you have not worked on a construction site. Or freight loading docks.


Posted by Mark Weiss
a resident of Downtown North

on Jun 8, 2020 at 12:37 pm

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7 people like this
Posted by Ted Glasser
a resident of St. Claire Gardens
on Jun 8, 2020 at 1:55 pm

I’ve been impressed by the outpouring of support — locally, nationally and even globally — for the Black Lives Matter movement. I’m impressed by the protests, the vigils, and the statements of solidarity from organizations and groups of all kinds. I’m proud of my daughter, a recent Gunn graduate, who spent many hours over the past few days marching in the name of justice. But I wonder how and when these public expressions of outrage will manifest themselves as political action that makes a difference. To be specific and concrete, if we’re serious about combatting systemic racism, how can we continue to ignore one of the most blatant and consequential examples of it: funding of public education. How many of us would be willing to mobilize support for legislation that mandated equity in per capita funding across school districts, such that public schools in East Palo Alto operate under the same budget constraints as public schools in Palo Alto? And how many of us would be willing to think creatively about ways to welcome private support for public education — for example, Palo Alto’s Partners in Education (PiE), which over the years has raised millions of dollars for Palo Alto schools — without widening the gap between the haves and the have nots.

I appreciate the lure of individual acts of kindness and the self-satisfaction that comes with it, but if we’re serious about reform, individuals acting alone — no matter how many — will never achieve the kind of foundational change we need to combat the biases of history. What we need instead is a stronger, broader and more inclusive sense of community, a bond that keeps us focused on what, collectively, we need, which may or may not coincide with what I want or you want.



Like this comment
Posted by Anon
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 8, 2020 at 2:27 pm

Posted by Skeptical, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood

>> “He said, ‘You’re not gonna move?’ I shook my head, held my sign over my chest, and thought, ‘I really hope this guy doesn’t shoot me,'” Sanderlin said. “He fired off a rubber bullet
]]

>> If this isn't provocation and agitation, I don't know what is. He says he’s a peacekeeper, but apparently wants to be the sacrifical lamb. And this not even from a criminal. I’m just so confused. The police are supposed to have therapy sessions with each and every person who intentionally and repeatedly disobeys their orders at a time of vast civil unrest?

I'm confused about the point you are making. I didn't see the original article, but, my assumption is that the police were supposed to be trying to control any vandalism that was going on. (Yes, I know there was serious vandalism at that first big San Jose gathering.) What excuse did the police have for shooting someone who was not committing vandalism?

I wasn't there, so, I can't tell the exact circumstances. But:

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances."

A lot of people were there to "petition the Government for a redress of grievances", so, unless this guy was a threat to someone's safety, I personally would not have fired at him. Yes, I know, I wasn't there, but, if you have further information that justifies what happened, let's hear it. However, "annoying a cop" is not a valid justification.


Posted by Mark Weiss
a resident of Downtown North

on Jun 8, 2020 at 3:30 pm

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Posted by Question About Speaker
a resident of Midtown
on Jun 8, 2020 at 8:14 pm

My high schooler attended the protest march and gathering at City Hall, with our full support . We were told that Mayor Adrian Fine when speaking to the crowd at City Hall said "your parents should be here too" (or something along those lines). Can someone who attended the march/gathering at the end please verify what you heard on that topic from Mayor Fine before I jump to any conclusions? I was hoping to see that comment referenced in this article but it's not. Thank you.


Posted by Mark Weiss
a resident of Downtown North

on Jun 8, 2020 at 8:59 pm

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2 people like this
Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jun 10, 2020 at 8:13 pm

The neighborhood I live in has all type people. It is very diversified. My neighbors are Indian, Asian, White, South American, and Black. I have never felt that this was a racist city. Many of our star athletes at school are black - we are there to cheer them on. And with a major University as our focal point how can people say we are racist? Sorry - do not get it.


2 people like this
Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jun 11, 2020 at 7:05 pm

I have not seen that this city is racist. What I do see is a portion of the population that is pro SB-50 - break up residential zoning. This is just feeding into their already established political positions. There is a group that has worked to break down the existing city norms - that has been going on for a while. And every one is just jumping around on one theme when it is just feeding this group of socialist progressives. And your newspapers help to sell this stuff.
If you have lived here for any length of time next to a major university then you know that we have a mixed population. We pay for tickets to go to their games.


4 people like this
Posted by Tony Favero
a resident of another community
on Jun 23, 2020 at 7:21 am


What does one make of this from the Telegraph in Britain? Yes, the words Black Lives Matter is a subset of All Lives Matter, but perhaps we need to dig deeper to evaluate not the words, but the Organization called BLM....is it really so benign or is there something else more nefarious about BLM that needs more review? Judge for yourself. Read the link below or investigate other sources, but let's not mindlessly jump in and assume that all is well with BLM (The organization please, NOT the words!)
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Web Link
Make no mistake – BLM: A radical neo-Marxist political movement
Alexandra Phillips 12 June 2020 • 5:35pm

The rapid spread of protests across the West under the Black Lives Matter banner has left a political breathlessness from Baltimore to Berlin. Those in positions of authority are scrambling to show they are addressing endemic racism, and in the commercial sphere, not ending up on the wrong side of the debate and risking Twitter storms and boycotts. In a world where nothing is exempt from moral judgment, being on trend means signing up to radical political movements.

That is what Black Lives Matter is. Don’t take my word for it. Take theirs. The form of words that appears on most online posts connected to the group riffs on ‘the black radical tradition’ which counts among its past contributors the Black Panther Movement and Malcom X. BLM happily self-identifies as a neo-Marxist movement with various far left objectives, including defunding the police (an evolution of the Panther position of public open-carry to control the police), to dismantling capitalism and the patriarchal system, disrupting the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure, seeking reparations from slavery to redistribute wealth and via various offshoot appeals, to raise money to bail black prisoners awaiting trial. The notion of seizing control of the apportionment of capital, dismantling the frameworks of society and neutralising and undermining law enforcement are not just Marxist, but anarchic.

Desperate to appease a vociferous clamour, celebrities and companies are queuing up to endorse. Airbnb has donated hundreds of thousands of dollars, an ironic move for a company that enables profiting from real estate through casual lets, driving up rental prices and gentrifying neighbourhoods, impacting on affordable leases in inner cities.

Nike, which has come under fire for using sweatshops to manufacture unaffordable, ‘aspirational’ footwear to pitch to the poorest in society, is now striving for racial equality. Amazon has banned the police from using their facial recognition software in tackling crime, yet are happy to push for greater intrusion in the private sphere.

UK tea manufacturers, whose business was built on the back of slavery and operate under neo-colonial plantation models where tea is grown and picked through agrarian toil in the developing world to be shipped for production, packaging and profits in the West have jumped on the hashtag #Solidaritea. Post-truth absurdity is where we have reached. Yet as companies commercially conflate the tagline Black Lives Matter, with the movement Black Lives Matter, momentum builds for an organisation with little scrutiny or accountability, that is able to mobilise millions and encourage, wilfully or not, outpourings of vandalism, looting and violence across the West.

With enormous sums of money flooding in - BLM had already received over $100 million from the Open Society Foundations, Ford Foundation and Borealis Philanthropy among others - and many written aims straight from the Communist copybook, there is surely reason for concern. Black Lives Matter is a somewhat amorphous and decentralised movement, allowing international chapters to set up under their banner. Not having a structure, a figurehead or centralised financial control means there is absolutely no accountability. Nobody to call for an end to violence, while providing a moral shield behind which perpetrators of crime can feel emboldened.

But decentralisation does not mean disorganisation. Even with a captive audience under lockdown filled with frustration, sparking a range of parallel protests across the West still demands highly skilled choreography. The sort of operation that requires thousands of avatars to flood social media platforms with calls to action, that can target and penetrate entire demographics simultaneously across a range of countries. That is simply not possible by a group of well meaning activists, however romantic about a cause you may wish to be. It can be achieved using extremely high level, sensitive intelligence equipment of the kind deep state operatives have access to.

Throughout history civil rights movements have been either aided and abetted or exploited by Communist foreign actors, from the American civil rights movement to apartheid in South Africa. By sowing discord in countries, socialist activists have hoped to nurture fertile grounds for socio-political fecundity. It is well within the realms of possibility that state-backed cyber warfare emanating from Russia and China would want to exploit and exacerbate mounting discontent while the West is still reeling from the pandemic.

A once small American movement that witnessed bursts of activity after individual cases of perceived police brutality has become the most prominent protest movement in Europe, and polarises societies wherever it goes. Unlike predecessors that often fell on the swords of their figureheads, this movement remains impervious to the accountability of a leader, because there are many. What we do know of the few founding members is that many are connected to radical Left organisations.

An FBI report released in 2017 found that attacks on police in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Dallas, Texas were influenced by the Black Lives Matter movement, with 28 pe rcent of those who used deadly force against police officers motivated by a hatred of police. An unclassified FBI study following the Dallas cop-killing spree of 2016 that left 5 officers shot dead reported departments and individual officers increasingly taking the decision to stop proactive policing amid concerns that anti-police defiance fueled in part by movements like Black Lives Matter had become the “new norm.”


6 people like this
Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jul 23, 2020 at 1:47 pm

So every one wants to live in peace? If every one would get on with their lives and live their best lives we all could settle down. But there has to be a group of Activist that are always stirring the pot. If we did a Myers-Briggs test on everyone there would always be a group who are activist - forever and ever on any topic of the day. That is what they do. X % of the population will always be activist.


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Posted by Richard
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Aug 27, 2020 at 2:47 am

Richard is a registered user.

That problem is really important Thanks!


4 people like this
Posted by Lee Forrest
a resident of Crescent Park
on Aug 27, 2020 at 8:48 am

Lee Forrest is a registered user.

>The PAPD has a long history of hassling minorities...

^ No different than any other police department across the nation. A standardized practice & pandemic in its own right.


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