News

Parks commission pitches new project: A city gym

Proposed facility would include space for basketball, indoor soccer, pickleball

Heart Fit For Life conducts its exercise class in Gym B at Cubberley Community Center in 2017. The city leases the gym space from the Palo Alto Unified School District. Embarcadero Media file photo by Veronica Weber.

Eager to give Palo Alto residents a new space to compete, exercise and socialize, the Parks and Recreation Commission is leading the charge on major new infrastructure project: a public gym.

The gym, which has an estimated price tag of about $25 million, would include three courts capable of accommodating basketball, volleyball, pickleball, indoor soccer, badminton and table tennis, according to a proposal put forth by a group of commissioners. It would also include exercise rooms where visitors can take yoga and Zumba classes and meeting rooms for smaller gatherings. It would also feature restrooms, changing rooms and administrative offices.

The plan remains in its earliest phase, with several key questions remaining to be answered. These include: Who will pay for the gym's construction and for its operating costs? Where will the new gym be located? And is the demand for indoor exercise space strong enough to overcome residents' anxieties about new construction?

But notwithstanding the various uncertainties inherent in the project, the commission earlier this month unanimously and enthusiastically supported moving ahead with plans, which members suggested could be funded by private organizations. They pointed to the newly opened Palo Alto Junior Museum and Zoo as an example of a possible partnership between the city and private groups to enhance the city's recreational offerings.

Discussions of a new gym aren't entirely new. In 2017, Palo Alto approved a new parks and recreation master plan that identified a public gym as an important need for the community. While the city leases the main gym at Cubberley Community Center, which is owned by the Palo Alto Unified School District, it has no gymnasiums of its own, the plan notes.

Help sustain the local news you depend on.

Your contribution matters. Become a member today.

Join

"As (a) means of responding to growth and to maintain, expand and provide future programming, at least one multi-purpose gymnasium is recognized as a community need," the master plan states.

Commissioner Jeff LaMere, who served on the ad hoc committee that crafted the proposal, argued at the Nov. 17 meeting the project is well worth pursuing. Once built, the gym would accommodate a broad swath of Palo Alto residents, from toddlers to seniors.

"I see a city gym as something that is sorely lacking from a city of our stature, a city of our wealth," said LaMere, who coaches the boys basketball team at Palo Alto High School. "A gym can be an anchor of health and wellness for this community. I think it should be a priority for us."

In the past, talks of a new gym tended to center on Cubberley Community Center, a dilapidated campus in south Palo Alto that once housed a high school. The city, which owns 8 acres of the campus, has been exploring for years a redevelopment plan for Cubberley that would be undertaken in conjunction with the Palo Alto Unified School District, which owns the remaining 27 acres. But while the master plan that was completed for Cubberley in 2019 includes a new health and wellness center, the plan's vision is unlikely to be realized any time soon — if ever. The school district has been reluctant to pursue any major redevelopment with the city, opting instead to reserve 20 acres of the community center as a possible site for a future high school.

Commission Chair Anne Cribbs, a strong advocate for building a new gym, said it's time to look beyond Cubberley.

Stay informed

Get the latest local news and information sent straight to your inbox.

Stay informed

Get the latest local news and information sent straight to your inbox.

"We've all been waiting for a long time for Cubberley," Cribbs said. "We understand the reasons why we had to wait and why it hadn't worked out, but it's just too risky right now. We need to start a gym at a place where we can be pretty confident about the land."

Her colleagues offered a few alternative locations for a new gym. One is a 10.5-acre site near the Baylands Athletic Center that became available after the city reconfigured its municipal golf course, now known as Baylands Golf Links. Another is somewhere in Ventura, a south Palo Alto neighborhood that has been identified as lacking in recreational amenities and that is now undergoing its own master plan for future development.

Commissioner Keith Reckdahl, who is also part of the committee exploring the gym proposal, said the choice of location will depend on numerous factors, including accessibility for potential users, availability of existing recreational facilities and the willingness of neighbors in the chosen area to support the project.

"Are they going to embrace it or are they going to view it as just bringing more traffic?" Reckdahl asked.

Commissioners also agreed, however, that the city will need to do far more research before the project is ready for council consideration. Vice Chair Jeff Greenfield said that while he believes, based on anecdotes and personal experience, that the demand for a gym exists, the council would likely need to see quantitative data about usage at existing gyms to substantiate the commission's position.

"I remember when my daughter was playing YMCA basketball, sometimes we had to go to Foothills College to get gym space to play," Greenfield said. "I believe the need is there. I believe the demand is there. I believe the shortage is there."

Funding is also expected to be a major wild card. The city has just completed the construction of a $23 million bike bridge and is now in the process of building a new public safety building, which has an estimated cost of $118 million. Both projects were on the city's list of infrastructure priorities. A new gym is not.

The obstacle, however, is not insurmountable, commissioners agreed. Palo Alto residents have a track record of supporting recreational facilities, as the Junior Museum and Zoo project demonstrates. The city also has two separate groups that help the city raise money for park improvements: the Palo Alto Recreation Foundation and Friends of Palo Alto Parks.

Commissioner David Moss also floated the possibility of asking residents to approve a bond to pay for a new gym: a mechanism that the city used in 2008 when it approved the renovation of its library system.

"I know that times are tough but we're coming out of it," Moss said. "I don't think we should take (the bond) off the table."

A front row seat to local high school sports.

Check out our new newsletter, the Playbook.

Follow Palo Alto Online and the Palo Alto Weekly on Twitter @paloaltoweekly, Facebook and on Instagram @paloaltoonline for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Your support is vital to us continuing to bring you city government news. Become a member today.

Parks commission pitches new project: A city gym

Proposed facility would include space for basketball, indoor soccer, pickleball

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Sun, Nov 28, 2021, 8:06 am

Eager to give Palo Alto residents a new space to compete, exercise and socialize, the Parks and Recreation Commission is leading the charge on major new infrastructure project: a public gym.

The gym, which has an estimated price tag of about $25 million, would include three courts capable of accommodating basketball, volleyball, pickleball, indoor soccer, badminton and table tennis, according to a proposal put forth by a group of commissioners. It would also include exercise rooms where visitors can take yoga and Zumba classes and meeting rooms for smaller gatherings. It would also feature restrooms, changing rooms and administrative offices.

The plan remains in its earliest phase, with several key questions remaining to be answered. These include: Who will pay for the gym's construction and for its operating costs? Where will the new gym be located? And is the demand for indoor exercise space strong enough to overcome residents' anxieties about new construction?

But notwithstanding the various uncertainties inherent in the project, the commission earlier this month unanimously and enthusiastically supported moving ahead with plans, which members suggested could be funded by private organizations. They pointed to the newly opened Palo Alto Junior Museum and Zoo as an example of a possible partnership between the city and private groups to enhance the city's recreational offerings.

Discussions of a new gym aren't entirely new. In 2017, Palo Alto approved a new parks and recreation master plan that identified a public gym as an important need for the community. While the city leases the main gym at Cubberley Community Center, which is owned by the Palo Alto Unified School District, it has no gymnasiums of its own, the plan notes.

"As (a) means of responding to growth and to maintain, expand and provide future programming, at least one multi-purpose gymnasium is recognized as a community need," the master plan states.

Commissioner Jeff LaMere, who served on the ad hoc committee that crafted the proposal, argued at the Nov. 17 meeting the project is well worth pursuing. Once built, the gym would accommodate a broad swath of Palo Alto residents, from toddlers to seniors.

"I see a city gym as something that is sorely lacking from a city of our stature, a city of our wealth," said LaMere, who coaches the boys basketball team at Palo Alto High School. "A gym can be an anchor of health and wellness for this community. I think it should be a priority for us."

In the past, talks of a new gym tended to center on Cubberley Community Center, a dilapidated campus in south Palo Alto that once housed a high school. The city, which owns 8 acres of the campus, has been exploring for years a redevelopment plan for Cubberley that would be undertaken in conjunction with the Palo Alto Unified School District, which owns the remaining 27 acres. But while the master plan that was completed for Cubberley in 2019 includes a new health and wellness center, the plan's vision is unlikely to be realized any time soon — if ever. The school district has been reluctant to pursue any major redevelopment with the city, opting instead to reserve 20 acres of the community center as a possible site for a future high school.

Commission Chair Anne Cribbs, a strong advocate for building a new gym, said it's time to look beyond Cubberley.

"We've all been waiting for a long time for Cubberley," Cribbs said. "We understand the reasons why we had to wait and why it hadn't worked out, but it's just too risky right now. We need to start a gym at a place where we can be pretty confident about the land."

Her colleagues offered a few alternative locations for a new gym. One is a 10.5-acre site near the Baylands Athletic Center that became available after the city reconfigured its municipal golf course, now known as Baylands Golf Links. Another is somewhere in Ventura, a south Palo Alto neighborhood that has been identified as lacking in recreational amenities and that is now undergoing its own master plan for future development.

Commissioner Keith Reckdahl, who is also part of the committee exploring the gym proposal, said the choice of location will depend on numerous factors, including accessibility for potential users, availability of existing recreational facilities and the willingness of neighbors in the chosen area to support the project.

"Are they going to embrace it or are they going to view it as just bringing more traffic?" Reckdahl asked.

Commissioners also agreed, however, that the city will need to do far more research before the project is ready for council consideration. Vice Chair Jeff Greenfield said that while he believes, based on anecdotes and personal experience, that the demand for a gym exists, the council would likely need to see quantitative data about usage at existing gyms to substantiate the commission's position.

"I remember when my daughter was playing YMCA basketball, sometimes we had to go to Foothills College to get gym space to play," Greenfield said. "I believe the need is there. I believe the demand is there. I believe the shortage is there."

Funding is also expected to be a major wild card. The city has just completed the construction of a $23 million bike bridge and is now in the process of building a new public safety building, which has an estimated cost of $118 million. Both projects were on the city's list of infrastructure priorities. A new gym is not.

The obstacle, however, is not insurmountable, commissioners agreed. Palo Alto residents have a track record of supporting recreational facilities, as the Junior Museum and Zoo project demonstrates. The city also has two separate groups that help the city raise money for park improvements: the Palo Alto Recreation Foundation and Friends of Palo Alto Parks.

Commissioner David Moss also floated the possibility of asking residents to approve a bond to pay for a new gym: a mechanism that the city used in 2008 when it approved the renovation of its library system.

"I know that times are tough but we're coming out of it," Moss said. "I don't think we should take (the bond) off the table."

Comments

Palo Alto Resident
Registered user
Downtown North
on Nov 28, 2021 at 12:37 pm
Palo Alto Resident, Downtown North
Registered user
on Nov 28, 2021 at 12:37 pm

I'm confused. There's a full gym at Cubberley (for some reason called the "Pavilion") that the city has leased for the last 30 years from the school district; the district doesn't use it or control it in any way, and apparently has no plans to. Isn't that the "public gym"? Is there something wrong with it?

Here's the image I found from the City website - it looks like a pretty standard high school gym - Web Link


Donya
Registered user
Barron Park
on Nov 28, 2021 at 2:00 pm
Donya, Barron Park
Registered user
on Nov 28, 2021 at 2:00 pm

Great idea. But how about an indoors swimming pool or pools? I visited a relative in Neuchâtel in Switzerland and accompanied her to their local indoor swimming pool. It was gorgeous and clean and affordable. We could use one of those facilities here. I know that we have the pool at the Rinconoda park but it is overcrowded and not fun to go into during the cold months.


Bystander
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Nov 28, 2021 at 4:56 pm
Bystander, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on Nov 28, 2021 at 4:56 pm

The sad thing is that we have plenty of facilities in Palo Alto, but not enough things for teens or young people to do on an ad hoc basis. Now that the evenings are dark and the parks are unavailable for playing catch, frisbee, or basketball there is so little for a group of people with lots of energy to do without signing up for a team or a class.

What we have very little of is places to go on a holiday weekend, on days without school, or when extended family are visiting and want to have an activity that doesn't involve screens. We no longer have a bowling alley and many of the local activities that were enjoyed a decade ago such as lazerquest and crazy golf are no longer in existence.

If we have this gym, will it provide more activities for local kids and young people or will it be just organized teams and classes?


felix
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Nov 28, 2021 at 6:12 pm
felix, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on Nov 28, 2021 at 6:12 pm

Ventura area would be great for a gym adults could use if space could be found. It’s fairly centrally located for all and ups the services to the most underserved neighborhood in town.

It would be folly to put it easy of 101 where no one lives, or in N. Palo Alto which is top heavy in services compared to S. PA where more people live.

And throw in a public pool for S. Palo Altans where adults can exercise and kids can have fun.


S. Underwood
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 28, 2021 at 6:35 pm
S. Underwood, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 28, 2021 at 6:35 pm

Interesting idea. I do wonder why I read story after story about Community Service / Parks & Rec with exactly 0.00 input from the department management OR the City Managers Office. Are our paid managers completely absent? If so, let's just hand the reins over the commission ... they seem to do all the work for literally 0% of the money.

I would really like to hear what a professional in this field says... if we have any.


eileen
Registered user
College Terrace
on Nov 28, 2021 at 10:31 pm
eileen , College Terrace
Registered user
on Nov 28, 2021 at 10:31 pm

Is this a free gym? Why should the city taxpayers spend 25 million on a gym you have to pay for? There are tons of private gyms around. How about creating a beautiful, free park where people can sit and enjoy trees, maybe a small pond, and nature? A big no on a gym!


BobH
Registered user
Palo Verde
on Nov 29, 2021 at 11:15 am
BobH, Palo Verde
Registered user
on Nov 29, 2021 at 11:15 am

My initial reaction is No, this is not needed. There are many other gyms available in Palo Alto.

Assuming there is $25M available to spend, wouldn't it be better spent on low income housing or putting the train tracks underground?


Consider Your Options.
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Nov 29, 2021 at 11:17 am
Consider Your Options. , Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on Nov 29, 2021 at 11:17 am

OH, for heavens sake.

The present gym at Cubberley is on the PAUSD-owned portion of the campus which PAUSD has just announced they are about to reclaim. The commission wants to look beyond underused Cubberley for a place where they "can be pretty confident about the land"? Really? The city OWNS the entire north end of Cubberley campus. There is no reason for lack of confidence or uncertainty about how it might be used. The city owns it. They get to decide. There's room for a gym there. It's time to replace the dilapidated buildings and get community services back at Cubberley. Provide services where they are needed. Fix the leaking roofs and cracked slabs, get rid of the asbestos floors, replace the broken utilities and single pane windows with rotting sills, create a community service space that works. We need it. We are going to need it more as more high density housing is being built in Palo Alto and specifically in areas near Cubberley.


TorreyaMan
Registered user
Palo Verde
on Nov 29, 2021 at 11:21 am
TorreyaMan, Palo Verde
Registered user
on Nov 29, 2021 at 11:21 am

Menlo Park has a very nice gym, so there is precedent, although I believe a large part of the cost was donated by one individual. Any new facility should have an indoor pool. I personally do not wish to use a private gym.


eileen
Registered user
College Terrace
on Nov 29, 2021 at 11:40 am
eileen , College Terrace
Registered user
on Nov 29, 2021 at 11:40 am

TorreyaMan, If we do build a new gym it should definitely have a pool and spa area.
When I lived in Germany years ago, every city, town, or village had a proper sports facility a pool, lockers, modern facilities, outdoor green space, and a gym for team sports.

Please do not build a sports facility that can only be teams. We need a place that will be open for the residents and families living here in Palo Alto. I don't have a problem paying an entrance fee, as they do in other places. I don't want this new gym taken over by sports teams as they do all our public parks! Not everyone in this town joins sports teams!


Barron Park Denizen
Registered user
Barron Park
on Nov 29, 2021 at 11:55 am
Barron Park Denizen, Barron Park
Registered user
on Nov 29, 2021 at 11:55 am

To echo Eileen and BobH, we already have private gyms. Even if space for a building could be found, why should substantial taxpayer funds be expended to compete unfairly with private business owners risking their personal capital? There is a continuing impression that Palo Alto, supplemented by its golden goose Utilities Department, has bottomless pockets, available for any nice-sounding cause. Yet there are huge public debts that need to be addressed right now, including City pensions and four railroad crossings. Add that all up, and it far exceeds a BILLION dollars even with substantial governmental assistance. And all this debt burden rests atop a population of only 67,000. Tax businesses? Try to catch Palantir, HP, and Tesla. Tax commuters? Their offices will move out of town, or employees will just work from home.


Carol Scott
Registered user
Evergreen Park
on Nov 29, 2021 at 12:04 pm
Carol Scott, Evergreen Park
Registered user
on Nov 29, 2021 at 12:04 pm

An indoor recreation facility -- especially one with a pool -- would be a great addition to South Palo Alto. Financing is tricky, but the need is there. Riconada and Lucie Stern (where some exercise classes are held) are hopelessly overcrowded, particularly since the pool at Riconada is taken over much of the time the Palo Alto swim team, masters' programs, and swim meets.


Fr0hickey
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Nov 29, 2021 at 12:30 pm
Fr0hickey, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Nov 29, 2021 at 12:30 pm

I don't see a reason to have Palo Alto tax payers foot the bill for something that private companies already compete in business for. There is a 24Hour Fitness in Mountain View.


Jim Hols.....
Registered user
Community Center
on Nov 29, 2021 at 2:38 pm
Jim Hols....., Community Center
Registered user
on Nov 29, 2021 at 2:38 pm

25 mil for a facility based on a commisioners desire. Meanwhile we have one small dog only space in Peers park. 2 chairs for the entire park and no cover or even an umbrella for the summer. Can we just spend thousands to fix woefully maintained spaces rather than 25M ? Dog parks in Palo Alto are the worst. They are important to non dog owners as the dogs have a place to play rather than pooping in the playing fields


Online Name
Registered user
Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Nov 29, 2021 at 4:29 pm
Online Name, Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
Registered user
on Nov 29, 2021 at 4:29 pm

Yes, let's put the money into the Animal Shelter and the dog parks. Not having more chairs and an umbrella at Peers Park is absurd.

At Mitchell Park, dog owners -- not the City -- have supplied the chairs and umbrellas for at least a decade. When we've wanted to dedicate a memorial bench, the city charged us $15,000 per bench. And that was years ago so that fee is surely more now.

As for the Animal Shelter, please bring back low-cost spay and neuter service and decent hours!


Rose
Registered user
Mayfield
on Nov 29, 2021 at 4:48 pm
Rose, Mayfield
Registered user
on Nov 29, 2021 at 4:48 pm

We should definitely build a new gym and an indoor swimming pool. It should be in Ventura or Barron Park where there are no facilities for Palo Altans who live in the south part of town. Either of these two neighborhoods also would be very bike accessible -- thereby encouraging more exercise and less auto pollution adding to climate disasters.


DTN Paul
Registered user
Downtown North
on Nov 29, 2021 at 8:25 pm
DTN Paul, Downtown North
Registered user
on Nov 29, 2021 at 8:25 pm

As a parent of a dog and a few humans, I would vote for amenities for humans, and not dogs.


Online Name
Registered user
Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Nov 29, 2021 at 8:48 pm
Online Name, Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
Registered user
on Nov 29, 2021 at 8:48 pm

Humans would be the ones sitting in the chairs so I quite agree. :->


New PaloAltan
Registered user
St. Claire Gardens
on Nov 30, 2021 at 3:38 pm
New PaloAltan, St. Claire Gardens
Registered user
on Nov 30, 2021 at 3:38 pm

With new COVID variants still erupting, and with the recent whisperings from WHO that COVID is now endemic (meaning, will always be with us), I doubt people will be able to safely swim in the same pool unless everyone gets vaccinated. When polio was still a pandemic, swimming pools were one of the worst vectors of disease. Children weren't swimming in public pools because children were the primary targets of polio. Now that we have a pandemic that doesn't discriminate against age, race, creed, color, or any nationality, we could be spending 25 million dollars in educating the local unvaccinated about the science behind vaccination. But yeah, let's build a pool. Let's name it "Super Spreader Swim Club". I'm all for the chairs at the dog park. I don't have a dog but I'd support that before supporting building a gym facility where everyone will breathe and sweat all over each other without even thinking about COVID.


tmp
Registered user
Downtown North
on Nov 30, 2021 at 5:24 pm
tmp, Downtown North
Registered user
on Nov 30, 2021 at 5:24 pm

This is why the city needs to commit to acquiring the Fry's site and turning it into a community park/recreation facility. It is the right area and the city is WAY behind in providing the park space that it calls for in the Palo Alto Comprehensive plan for the thousands and thousands of additional people we have been adding with the overpopulation boom in this area.

This is a large area, is planned to be redeveloped and should go to help the residents of Palo Alto. Do not let the city rezone it to increase the value and help the current developers that own it. Rather keep it zoned as is and then once acquired change it to park space for the community.


RitaLancefield
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Nov 30, 2021 at 7:19 pm
RitaLancefield, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Nov 30, 2021 at 7:19 pm

I question the wisdom of spending money and land on a gym when we cannot find money and land for low to moderate income housing. It is unconscionable that we do not make a full faith attempt to house the people who work in our city, but can talk of building a city gym.


Marie
Registered user
South of Midtown
on Dec 1, 2021 at 3:01 pm
Marie, South of Midtown
Registered user
on Dec 1, 2021 at 3:01 pm

There are no shortage of gyms in Palo Alto. We desperately need a new animal shelter and low income housing. If this gym was going to be available to all, I might consider supporting it. But if their model is the rebuilt Junior Museum, I am against it. That means cost of running it will be covered by charges to whoever joins the gym, not necessarily even residents of Palo Alto. And if the funding model is similar ($10 per head for the Junior Museum), it will not be affordable to anyone but a millionaire. But that seems to be the demographic the current city administration wants to satisfy. Forget us regular middle class folks and don't even consider low income people. Like the Palo Alto Airport and the Golf course, you are only welcome if you are amongst the wealthy.


Larry Klein
Registered user
Los Altos
on Dec 3, 2021 at 10:21 am
Larry Klein, Los Altos
Registered user
on Dec 3, 2021 at 10:21 am

Maybe the PACC could consider a joint venture with the YMCA and share the development & operating costs? That said, perhaps the time is not right to be conceptualizing this project as the coronavirus is still quite active & any subsequent public health mandates could trigger an indefinite closure.

Lastly, if Palo Alto has a surplus $25M to spend/waste on a city-exclusive fitness center it must not be hurting for money. And what about non-residents and out-of-towners also wishing to partake in its Pelotron splendor? Will an exclusive Palo Alto 'residents only' gym become another Foothills Park debacle?


Ofcourse!
Registered user
Charleston Meadows
on Dec 3, 2021 at 11:31 pm
Ofcourse!, Charleston Meadows
Registered user
on Dec 3, 2021 at 11:31 pm

Non-residents already use the Cubberley gyms. Palo Alto lets non-residents swim in their pools and neighboring cities let Palo Alto residents swim in their pools. So parallels to Foothills Park are either incredibly ignorant or intentionally inflammatory.

The proposal is for an old-fashioned basketball/volleyball gym, perhaps with a yoga room. The proposal didn't mention anything remotely close to "Pelotron (sic) splendor".

Remarks about the City wasting money are also inaccurate. The article states that a gym is not on the City's infrastructure list, so the plans are for a privately-funded gym.

Please, more facts and less provocative snark.


Marie
Registered user
South of Midtown
on Dec 6, 2021 at 11:57 am
Marie, South of Midtown
Registered user
on Dec 6, 2021 at 11:57 am

The highest cost of any development in Palo Alto is land. If the city allocates any of its rarest resource to a facility that will be run primarily for its wealthiest residents, it will be a real shame. Please use our scarcest resource for a new animal shelter, parks (very much needed as our population goes up) and most of all for very low and low income housing. Without the cost of land, and with some suspension of fees (does low income housing really need to contribute to public art?), I believe permanent (not financed with government tax credits that allow the conversion of the property to market rate in 30-50 years) low income housing could be financed by the rents anticipated, especially if some workforce housing is allowed (only enough to pencil out).


Anonymous
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Dec 6, 2021 at 7:02 pm
Anonymous, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Dec 6, 2021 at 7:02 pm

I agree that land in Palo Alto is valuable and important.
I’m interested in:
a new animal shelter building at existing site; optimized use of central Cubberley site with services for all residents;
no interest whatsoever in any dog park addition.
I agree teams shouldn’t be allowed to dominate everything; individual residents also need and wish to “recreate” (if that’s a verb)


Fritzie Blue
Registered user
Stanford
on Dec 7, 2021 at 11:05 am
Fritzie Blue, Stanford
Registered user
on Dec 7, 2021 at 11:05 am

This is almost like one of those April fools stories printed here each April 1st. Count me in with those supporting a new animal shelter. That clearly should be the priority over an unnecessary gym.


J Schwartz
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Dec 10, 2021 at 10:31 am
J Schwartz , Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Dec 10, 2021 at 10:31 am

With so many recreational public and private opportunities available in Palo Alto, I would rather see that money and land be used to support housing that is accessible and available to the city public servants (teachers, firefighters, police, utility, etc.) and low wage workers our community depends upon.


Don't miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.

Post a comment

In order to encourage respectful and thoughtful discussion, commenting on stories is available to those who are registered users. If you are already a registered user and the commenting form is not below, you need to log in. If you are not registered, you can do so here.

Please make sure your comments are truthful, on-topic and do not disrespect another poster. Don't be snarky or belittling. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

See our announcement about requiring registration for commenting.