News

Storm batters Midpeninsula with wind, heavy rain

Officials lift evacuation orders for CZU burn area

A pedestrian walks past the Apple Store in downtown Palo Alto in the rain on Feb. 4, 2019. Photo by Veronica Weber.

The Midpeninsula is still feeling the effects of the atmospheric river that swept through the Bay Area over the weekend, with downed trees, power outages and flooding.

The National Weather Service reported early Monday that the season's first major storm in the Bay Area was inching southward. Blustery, wet conditions resulted in localized flooding, downed powerlines, fallen trees and traffic accidents around the region.

The storm is expected to clear the area by Monday evening, forecasters said, and there is a chance of showers on Tuesday.

Rainfall during the storm was impressive. The 48-hour rainfall total as of Monday morning was 4.75 inches recorded in Woodside, 4.19 inches in Los Altos, 3.77 inches in Redwood City, 3.21 inches at Stanford and 2.12 inches in Palo Alto, according to the National Weather Service. A full list of Bay Area rainfall reports can be found at weather.gov.

While the flood advisory was canceled late Sunday night for the Bay Area, the National Weather Service issued a reminder that its high surf warning is still in effect through 11 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 26.

What's local journalism worth to you?

Support Palo Alto Online for as little as $5/month.

Join

The storm will continue to generate large swells, along with breaking waves reaching 20-30 feet at west/northwest facing beaches.

The warning urges people to stay off coastal jetties and never turn their backs to the ocean in such conditions, which include the increased risk of sneaker waves, large breaking waves, rip currents and increased coastal run up.

The storm brought impressive rainfall totals across the Bay Area, with Ben Lomond Mountain clocking in at 9.63 inches, Mt. Tamalpais hitting 16.55 inches, the Oakland hills recording more than 7 inches in places and St. Helena getting hit with nearly 11 inches of rain, according to the National Weather Service.

Downtown San Francisco recorded its wettest October day ever, with more than 4 inches of rain.

Evacuation orders lifted

Evacuation orders for people living in the CZU Fire burn scar areas of Santa Cruz and San Mateo counties were lifted Monday morning.

The orders were issued at 8 a.m. Sunday. By Monday morning, the Cal Fire CZU Felton Emergency Command Center reported that it had logged 124 incidents in Santa Cruz and San Mateo counties over the past 24 hours or so.

During a typical 24-hour period, it will field an average of 25 to 30 incidents, Cal Fire reported Monday.

"The National Weather Service has allowed the Flash Flood Watch and Wind Advisory for the area of the CZU Lightning Complex to expire, and the threat has passed," according to a news release from San Mateo County and Cal Fire officials.

People are still urged to travel the area with caution while the roads remain wet and crews work to clear downed trees and power lines.

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox in our Express newsletter.

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox in our Express newsletter.

Follow Palo Alto Online and the Palo Alto Weekly on Twitter @paloaltoweekly, Facebook and on Instagram @paloaltoonline for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Storm batters Midpeninsula with wind, heavy rain

Officials lift evacuation orders for CZU burn area

by /

Uploaded: Sun, Oct 24, 2021, 10:32 am
Updated: Mon, Oct 25, 2021, 4:49 pm

The Midpeninsula is still feeling the effects of the atmospheric river that swept through the Bay Area over the weekend, with downed trees, power outages and flooding.

The National Weather Service reported early Monday that the season's first major storm in the Bay Area was inching southward. Blustery, wet conditions resulted in localized flooding, downed powerlines, fallen trees and traffic accidents around the region.

The storm is expected to clear the area by Monday evening, forecasters said, and there is a chance of showers on Tuesday.

Rainfall during the storm was impressive. The 48-hour rainfall total as of Monday morning was 4.75 inches recorded in Woodside, 4.19 inches in Los Altos, 3.77 inches in Redwood City, 3.21 inches at Stanford and 2.12 inches in Palo Alto, according to the National Weather Service. A full list of Bay Area rainfall reports can be found at weather.gov.

While the flood advisory was canceled late Sunday night for the Bay Area, the National Weather Service issued a reminder that its high surf warning is still in effect through 11 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 26.

The storm will continue to generate large swells, along with breaking waves reaching 20-30 feet at west/northwest facing beaches.

The warning urges people to stay off coastal jetties and never turn their backs to the ocean in such conditions, which include the increased risk of sneaker waves, large breaking waves, rip currents and increased coastal run up.

The storm brought impressive rainfall totals across the Bay Area, with Ben Lomond Mountain clocking in at 9.63 inches, Mt. Tamalpais hitting 16.55 inches, the Oakland hills recording more than 7 inches in places and St. Helena getting hit with nearly 11 inches of rain, according to the National Weather Service.

Downtown San Francisco recorded its wettest October day ever, with more than 4 inches of rain.

Evacuation orders for people living in the CZU Fire burn scar areas of Santa Cruz and San Mateo counties were lifted Monday morning.

The orders were issued at 8 a.m. Sunday. By Monday morning, the Cal Fire CZU Felton Emergency Command Center reported that it had logged 124 incidents in Santa Cruz and San Mateo counties over the past 24 hours or so.

During a typical 24-hour period, it will field an average of 25 to 30 incidents, Cal Fire reported Monday.

"The National Weather Service has allowed the Flash Flood Watch and Wind Advisory for the area of the CZU Lightning Complex to expire, and the threat has passed," according to a news release from San Mateo County and Cal Fire officials.

People are still urged to travel the area with caution while the roads remain wet and crews work to clear downed trees and power lines.

Comments

There are no comments yet. Please share yours below.

Post a comment

In order to encourage respectful and thoughtful discussion, commenting on stories is available to those who are registered users. If you are already a registered user and the commenting form is not below, you need to log in. If you are not registered, you can do so here.

Please make sure your comments are truthful, on-topic and do not disrespect another poster. Don't be snarky or belittling. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

See our announcement about requiring registration for commenting.