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In pandemic-induced renter's market, some Bay Area residents still struggle with rent

An apartment complex at 2001 Manhattan Ave. in East Palo Alto, managed by Woodland Park Communities. East Palo Alto has seen little change in rent rates this year compared to 2019. Embarcadero Media file photo.

The Bay Area might now be a buyer's market for apartments, but not for renters like Cecilia Orellana. She has not worked since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic and now owes over $13,000 of unpaid rent.

Orellana immigrated from El Salvador in 2001 and her family now lives in the Woodland Park Apartments in East Palo Alto — a working-class, majority Latinx community. She lives in a two-bedroom apartment for $2,850 a month with five family members: her husband, sister, son and two nephews.

All of the working adults — Orellana, her husband, and sister — lost work at the beginning of the pandemic, and paying rent has turned into their biggest worry. With California's Tenant Relief Act, they're protected from eviction, but accrue more and more rent debt as the months tick by.

'We immigrants live paycheck to paycheck'

"It is a crisis, especially for those of us who don't have a voice, us immigrants. There are a lot of people who don't say anything because they're afraid," Orellana said in an interview translated from Spanish. "We immigrants live paycheck to paycheck. All our money goes to paying rent, and we can't save at any time."

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Millions of Californians face Orellana's plight, with over 1 in 5 reporting that they had little to no confidence in their ability to pay next month's rent, according to census data collected in October. Some renters continue to face unemployment and lost income, and eviction protections under the Tenant Relief Act won't last forever.

As Bay Area residents move out to more affordable cities, vacancies rise and rents fall, leaving some landlords unwilling to reduce rents as they face their own fees and mortgages. Landlord associations and housing leaders seem to agree that the only way forward is rent relief from the federal government.

Tech hubs see increased vacancies

Apartments and retailers at the Village at San Antonio Center in Mountain View, one of many Bay Area cities that has seen the largest declines in rent during the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

"For Rent." Vanessa Khaleel sees that sign more and more from her office in Hayes Valley. And that's not something the deputy director of the San Francisco Apartment Association wants to see.

The San Francisco Apartment Association has roughly 4,800 members — who can own a variable number of units — and about 60% are small mom and pop landlords who own 10 or fewer units, according to Khaleel.

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"Our owners are seeing vacancies at about 20% higher and then they're seeing their market rents come down anywhere from 20 to 25% so those two things are creating a financial hit to the property owners," Khaleel said.

As a result, some larger apartment owners are offering creative rent specials that can include subscription service perks from DoorDash to Peloton.

Rent dropping in San Francisco

In Bay Area cities like San Francisco, rent is dropping by record numbers, yet in other cities, people still struggle to pay rent. Not everyone is enjoying the benefits of the emerging "renter's market."

There's the story of remote tech workers seeking cheaper and more spacious housing away from the once-bustling cities where the pandemic has now slowed activities. College students, who would usually live around campus in cities like Berkeley, are moving back in with their parents.

Crystal Chen is marketing manager at Zumper, an online rental platform. "I was born and raised in San Francisco and it's crazy to see," Chen said. "All I've seen is rents go up and up. This is the first time I've ever seen rents go down this much."

Chen said that some of the largest declines are in the tech-heavy Peninsula and the South Bay, in cities like Menlo Park, Mountain View and Santa Clara.

"We've seen the pandemic shift the demand for rentals away from really expensive markets toward more affordable cities," Chen said.

Zumper's rental report for the San Francisco Bay Area metro showed that some of the cities with the most expensive rent — San Francisco, Mountain View, Cupertino, Palo Alto and Menlo Park — have seen huge declines compared to the same time last year. Rents have been steadily declining in major cities during the pandemic.

It's a classic market economy: people are moving out, demand decreases, and rents go down. San Francisco joins other metropolitan hubs around the country where people are opting out of city life in search of suburban comforts.

"It seems like there's an exodus of a significant portion of the population in big cities, Chen said. "If you're going to be stuck at home all day you don't want to be stuck in a shoe box."

In other Bay Area cities, there's the story of working-class people who cannot afford their rent despite the "renter's market" that is creating vacancies and discounted rent. In some places, people leave because they cannot afford their rent.

Justin Accola, senior property manager with Altos Realty Advisors, said in an October interview that they were seeing double the number of vacancies. Altos manages a range of properties in the Bay Area, from apartment complexes to single-family homes.

Vacancies in tech-heavy cities

Gabi Jubran, MPC Ready area 20 coordinator, walks to an apartment complex in Menlo Park's Coleman Place neighborhood on May 21. The Bay Area Equity Atlas has found that 48% of San Mateo County renters are rent-burdened. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

Accola noticed that the vacancies are concentrated in tech-heavy cities, but said, "In East Palo Alto and unincorporated Menlo Park, the turnover rate has been super quiet over there."

He's also noticed more people moving in with family members, adding roommates to their lease, or downsizing to save costs.

In order to keep good tenants, Accola said landlords have been working with tenants by connecting them to rent relief resources, setting up payment plans, accepting portions of rent and sometimes even forgiving the difference that tenants can't pay.

But not all landlords are willing to decrease their rent.

"A lot of owners aren't doing that because they think it's going to be harder to bring it back up if said tenants fall under a rent control category," Accola said.

Rent remains unaffordable for some communities

The Bay Area Equity Atlas, an online repository of data focused on inequality metrics in the region, found that 48% of San Mateo County renters are rent-burdened (spending more than 30% of their income on rent) and Latinx families? — like Orellana's — are especially at risk of being rent-burdened and economically insecure.

"We get our food at food banks and we live off of what we can get because the economic situation right now is very difficult for us," Orellana said. "In this country people do not talk about poverty, but right now there is very extreme poverty in this time of crisis."

The pandemic has been especially difficult for undocumented communities, who are ineligible for federal assistance such as the stimulus check or unemployment benefits.

Gov. Gavin Newsom signed the Tenant Relief Act, officially known as California's Assembly Bill 3088, at the end of August to protect renters like Orellana. The act prohibits residential evictions through January 2021 if renters cannot pay rent due to the pandemic. But they must pay 25% of their rent for September 2020 through January 2021.

Starting in February, landlords could collect owed rent through small claims court. Evictions may not be able to proceed, but tenants will still owe rent.

Orellana said she received rental assistance from the San Mateo nonprofit Samaritan House, which will cover 25% of her rent from October through December. Her sister is back to work, but with fewer hours and reduced salary. Some things are looking up, but the future still looks grim as Orellana wonders how they will repay the thousands of dollars of unpaid rent.

"It's a very uncertain future and one of more poverty that we'll be living in," Orellana said. Even when the pandemic ends, she said, "You won't immediately see jobs going back to hire employees like before. When the economy starts to go up it's going to be very gradually, very slowly."

Slight drop in rent in East Palo Alto

California's Tenant Relief Act, which prohibits residential evictions through this January if renters cannot pay rent due to the pandemic, is set to expire in February. Embarcadero Media file photo.

East Palo Alto, like San Francisco and the rest of the Bay Area, saw some of its highest unemployment rates in years, but it appears that rents in East Palo Alto have not declined as much as in San Francisco, according to anecdotal evidence.

Zumper has limited data and listings for some cities like East Palo Alto. That said, its latest rent report showed that East Palo Alto's rent hadn't changed compared to last year, and had dropped just 4% compared to the previous month.

Abisai Moreno, program counselor with East Palo Alto's Rent Stabilization Program, said that earlier in the pandemic she even received calls about tenants getting invalid rent increases or receiving eviction threats, which she has had to rectify with landlords.

"For the most part they (landlords) ended up complying because they have to, Moreno said.

While she received some calls from landlords concerned about rent, Moreno said "they weren't desperate calls like the ones I get from tenants." She's taken a lot of calls where she's just had to let the tenant vent and validate their experience.

"I had a call about a family who was renting a garage, and they were being charged $2,500. They had a family of three and were unable to pay their rent," Moreno said. "There's a desperation with people that are getting taken advantage of, even during this time."

"Despite the moratorium, tenants are still very much stressed out and afraid they're going to lose their housing," Moreno said.

Landlord associations call for rent relief over eviction moratorium

Zumper's report for the San Francisco Bay Area metro showed that some of the cities with the most expensive rent, such as Palo Alto, have seen huge declines compared to the same time last year. Embarcadero Media file photo.

The Bay Area Equity Atlas warned that up to 7,900 households in San Mateo County could be at risk for eviction or homelessness if renter protections were to end. Wayne Rowland, board president of the East Bay Rental Housing Association (EBRHA) said that landlords are more likely to want to work with tenants.

"The rental property owner has only one customer: the renters," Rowland said. The EBRHA provides education and advice to property owners and managers in Alameda and Contra Costa counties.

Even without the moratorium, Rowland said property owners may not have opted to evict tenants in the first place and were probably preparing to work with tenants.

"If everybody's out of work and you evict a tenant so that you can get another tenant who's also out of work, that makes no sense," Rowland said.

He favors rent relief over the eviction moratorium.

"(The eviction moratorium) is OK for something that's temporary, but we're talking about almost a year. That's got to be financially exhausting for anyone who relies on the income stream of properties," Rowland said.

During city and county meetings over the last several months, landlords and property owners have spoken up about the financial difficulties of lost rent. They worry about not being able to pay their mortgage, or losing their properties.

Mom and pop landlords may lose out on rent that makes up their main source of income.

In July, UC Berkeley's Terner Center for Housing Innovation and the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals surveyed 380 property owners and managers from various states (including 22% from California). Most responded that rent collections were down compared to the prior quarter and 1 in 4 had borrowed funds to cover operating costs.

In San Mateo County, the Board of Supervisors responded by allocating $2 million of federal coronavirus relief funds toward a small property owner relief fund. Eligible property owners who lost rent during the pandemic could receive grants of up to $6,000.

Working the system

Some landlords also face tenants who take advantage of the eviction moratorium to avoid paying rent, even if they're financially able.

In emails to the Law Offices of Todd Rothbard — a team of Bay Area evictions attorneys — property managers and landlords wrote about tenants who refused to pay rent and abused the eviction moratorium.

One property manager of a single-family home said that in April, their tenant — who they said was a young Facebook engineer — refused to pay rent because he thought the rent was too high.

"I think he is abusing the system by using COVID-19 eviction restriction as an opportunity to extract rent concession from the landlord," the manager wrote.

Todd Rothbard said that his office had seen a sharp decrease in evictions actions, from 300 to 400 a month before the pandemic to less than 100 a month. Rothbard does not support the statewide moratorium.

"Let the market proceed," Rothbard said. "There will not be an avalanche of evictions. Most landlords don't want vacancies. Now you have a situation where Legislature is encouraging people not to pay rent. They're creating a backlog that's going to explode."

Thomas Bannon, CEO of the California Apartment Association, supported the moratorium but thinks it's time for the moratorium to be lifted.

"I think how it's been handled so far is not going to encourage people and capital to go into the rental housing industry," Bannon said. "That's a problem because we haven't been successful in public housing serving everybody."

He said that the California Apartment Association encouraged its members to work with tenants instead of evicting them. Now he's worried about the consequences if the federal government does not provide rent relief.

"You've got to figure out a way that the landlord can either be made whole or pretty close to it. If not, they will probably sell their single family rental units and walk away," Bannon said.

If single-family homes go from being a rental property to the housing market, somebody wins, Bannon said, "But the people that lose are the renters who have a difficult time paying," he said.

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In pandemic-induced renter's market, some Bay Area residents still struggle with rent

by / Bay City News Service

Uploaded: Sun, Dec 13, 2020, 9:40 am
Updated: Wed, Dec 16, 2020, 9:33 am

The Bay Area might now be a buyer's market for apartments, but not for renters like Cecilia Orellana. She has not worked since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic and now owes over $13,000 of unpaid rent.

Orellana immigrated from El Salvador in 2001 and her family now lives in the Woodland Park Apartments in East Palo Alto — a working-class, majority Latinx community. She lives in a two-bedroom apartment for $2,850 a month with five family members: her husband, sister, son and two nephews.

All of the working adults — Orellana, her husband, and sister — lost work at the beginning of the pandemic, and paying rent has turned into their biggest worry. With California's Tenant Relief Act, they're protected from eviction, but accrue more and more rent debt as the months tick by.

'We immigrants live paycheck to paycheck'

"It is a crisis, especially for those of us who don't have a voice, us immigrants. There are a lot of people who don't say anything because they're afraid," Orellana said in an interview translated from Spanish. "We immigrants live paycheck to paycheck. All our money goes to paying rent, and we can't save at any time."

Millions of Californians face Orellana's plight, with over 1 in 5 reporting that they had little to no confidence in their ability to pay next month's rent, according to census data collected in October. Some renters continue to face unemployment and lost income, and eviction protections under the Tenant Relief Act won't last forever.

As Bay Area residents move out to more affordable cities, vacancies rise and rents fall, leaving some landlords unwilling to reduce rents as they face their own fees and mortgages. Landlord associations and housing leaders seem to agree that the only way forward is rent relief from the federal government.

Tech hubs see increased vacancies

"For Rent." Vanessa Khaleel sees that sign more and more from her office in Hayes Valley. And that's not something the deputy director of the San Francisco Apartment Association wants to see.

The San Francisco Apartment Association has roughly 4,800 members — who can own a variable number of units — and about 60% are small mom and pop landlords who own 10 or fewer units, according to Khaleel.

"Our owners are seeing vacancies at about 20% higher and then they're seeing their market rents come down anywhere from 20 to 25% so those two things are creating a financial hit to the property owners," Khaleel said.

As a result, some larger apartment owners are offering creative rent specials that can include subscription service perks from DoorDash to Peloton.

Rent dropping in San Francisco

In Bay Area cities like San Francisco, rent is dropping by record numbers, yet in other cities, people still struggle to pay rent. Not everyone is enjoying the benefits of the emerging "renter's market."

There's the story of remote tech workers seeking cheaper and more spacious housing away from the once-bustling cities where the pandemic has now slowed activities. College students, who would usually live around campus in cities like Berkeley, are moving back in with their parents.

Crystal Chen is marketing manager at Zumper, an online rental platform. "I was born and raised in San Francisco and it's crazy to see," Chen said. "All I've seen is rents go up and up. This is the first time I've ever seen rents go down this much."

Chen said that some of the largest declines are in the tech-heavy Peninsula and the South Bay, in cities like Menlo Park, Mountain View and Santa Clara.

"We've seen the pandemic shift the demand for rentals away from really expensive markets toward more affordable cities," Chen said.

Zumper's rental report for the San Francisco Bay Area metro showed that some of the cities with the most expensive rent — San Francisco, Mountain View, Cupertino, Palo Alto and Menlo Park — have seen huge declines compared to the same time last year. Rents have been steadily declining in major cities during the pandemic.

It's a classic market economy: people are moving out, demand decreases, and rents go down. San Francisco joins other metropolitan hubs around the country where people are opting out of city life in search of suburban comforts.

"It seems like there's an exodus of a significant portion of the population in big cities, Chen said. "If you're going to be stuck at home all day you don't want to be stuck in a shoe box."

In other Bay Area cities, there's the story of working-class people who cannot afford their rent despite the "renter's market" that is creating vacancies and discounted rent. In some places, people leave because they cannot afford their rent.

Justin Accola, senior property manager with Altos Realty Advisors, said in an October interview that they were seeing double the number of vacancies. Altos manages a range of properties in the Bay Area, from apartment complexes to single-family homes.

Vacancies in tech-heavy cities

Accola noticed that the vacancies are concentrated in tech-heavy cities, but said, "In East Palo Alto and unincorporated Menlo Park, the turnover rate has been super quiet over there."

He's also noticed more people moving in with family members, adding roommates to their lease, or downsizing to save costs.

In order to keep good tenants, Accola said landlords have been working with tenants by connecting them to rent relief resources, setting up payment plans, accepting portions of rent and sometimes even forgiving the difference that tenants can't pay.

But not all landlords are willing to decrease their rent.

"A lot of owners aren't doing that because they think it's going to be harder to bring it back up if said tenants fall under a rent control category," Accola said.

Rent remains unaffordable for some communities

The Bay Area Equity Atlas, an online repository of data focused on inequality metrics in the region, found that 48% of San Mateo County renters are rent-burdened (spending more than 30% of their income on rent) and Latinx families? — like Orellana's — are especially at risk of being rent-burdened and economically insecure.

"We get our food at food banks and we live off of what we can get because the economic situation right now is very difficult for us," Orellana said. "In this country people do not talk about poverty, but right now there is very extreme poverty in this time of crisis."

The pandemic has been especially difficult for undocumented communities, who are ineligible for federal assistance such as the stimulus check or unemployment benefits.

Gov. Gavin Newsom signed the Tenant Relief Act, officially known as California's Assembly Bill 3088, at the end of August to protect renters like Orellana. The act prohibits residential evictions through January 2021 if renters cannot pay rent due to the pandemic. But they must pay 25% of their rent for September 2020 through January 2021.

Starting in February, landlords could collect owed rent through small claims court. Evictions may not be able to proceed, but tenants will still owe rent.

Orellana said she received rental assistance from the San Mateo nonprofit Samaritan House, which will cover 25% of her rent from October through December. Her sister is back to work, but with fewer hours and reduced salary. Some things are looking up, but the future still looks grim as Orellana wonders how they will repay the thousands of dollars of unpaid rent.

"It's a very uncertain future and one of more poverty that we'll be living in," Orellana said. Even when the pandemic ends, she said, "You won't immediately see jobs going back to hire employees like before. When the economy starts to go up it's going to be very gradually, very slowly."

Slight drop in rent in East Palo Alto

East Palo Alto, like San Francisco and the rest of the Bay Area, saw some of its highest unemployment rates in years, but it appears that rents in East Palo Alto have not declined as much as in San Francisco, according to anecdotal evidence.

Zumper has limited data and listings for some cities like East Palo Alto. That said, its latest rent report showed that East Palo Alto's rent hadn't changed compared to last year, and had dropped just 4% compared to the previous month.

Abisai Moreno, program counselor with East Palo Alto's Rent Stabilization Program, said that earlier in the pandemic she even received calls about tenants getting invalid rent increases or receiving eviction threats, which she has had to rectify with landlords.

"For the most part they (landlords) ended up complying because they have to, Moreno said.

While she received some calls from landlords concerned about rent, Moreno said "they weren't desperate calls like the ones I get from tenants." She's taken a lot of calls where she's just had to let the tenant vent and validate their experience.

"I had a call about a family who was renting a garage, and they were being charged $2,500. They had a family of three and were unable to pay their rent," Moreno said. "There's a desperation with people that are getting taken advantage of, even during this time."

"Despite the moratorium, tenants are still very much stressed out and afraid they're going to lose their housing," Moreno said.

Landlord associations call for rent relief over eviction moratorium

The Bay Area Equity Atlas warned that up to 7,900 households in San Mateo County could be at risk for eviction or homelessness if renter protections were to end. Wayne Rowland, board president of the East Bay Rental Housing Association (EBRHA) said that landlords are more likely to want to work with tenants.

"The rental property owner has only one customer: the renters," Rowland said. The EBRHA provides education and advice to property owners and managers in Alameda and Contra Costa counties.

Even without the moratorium, Rowland said property owners may not have opted to evict tenants in the first place and were probably preparing to work with tenants.

"If everybody's out of work and you evict a tenant so that you can get another tenant who's also out of work, that makes no sense," Rowland said.

He favors rent relief over the eviction moratorium.

"(The eviction moratorium) is OK for something that's temporary, but we're talking about almost a year. That's got to be financially exhausting for anyone who relies on the income stream of properties," Rowland said.

During city and county meetings over the last several months, landlords and property owners have spoken up about the financial difficulties of lost rent. They worry about not being able to pay their mortgage, or losing their properties.

Mom and pop landlords may lose out on rent that makes up their main source of income.

In July, UC Berkeley's Terner Center for Housing Innovation and the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals surveyed 380 property owners and managers from various states (including 22% from California). Most responded that rent collections were down compared to the prior quarter and 1 in 4 had borrowed funds to cover operating costs.

In San Mateo County, the Board of Supervisors responded by allocating $2 million of federal coronavirus relief funds toward a small property owner relief fund. Eligible property owners who lost rent during the pandemic could receive grants of up to $6,000.

Working the system

Some landlords also face tenants who take advantage of the eviction moratorium to avoid paying rent, even if they're financially able.

In emails to the Law Offices of Todd Rothbard — a team of Bay Area evictions attorneys — property managers and landlords wrote about tenants who refused to pay rent and abused the eviction moratorium.

One property manager of a single-family home said that in April, their tenant — who they said was a young Facebook engineer — refused to pay rent because he thought the rent was too high.

"I think he is abusing the system by using COVID-19 eviction restriction as an opportunity to extract rent concession from the landlord," the manager wrote.

Todd Rothbard said that his office had seen a sharp decrease in evictions actions, from 300 to 400 a month before the pandemic to less than 100 a month. Rothbard does not support the statewide moratorium.

"Let the market proceed," Rothbard said. "There will not be an avalanche of evictions. Most landlords don't want vacancies. Now you have a situation where Legislature is encouraging people not to pay rent. They're creating a backlog that's going to explode."

Thomas Bannon, CEO of the California Apartment Association, supported the moratorium but thinks it's time for the moratorium to be lifted.

"I think how it's been handled so far is not going to encourage people and capital to go into the rental housing industry," Bannon said. "That's a problem because we haven't been successful in public housing serving everybody."

He said that the California Apartment Association encouraged its members to work with tenants instead of evicting them. Now he's worried about the consequences if the federal government does not provide rent relief.

"You've got to figure out a way that the landlord can either be made whole or pretty close to it. If not, they will probably sell their single family rental units and walk away," Bannon said.

If single-family homes go from being a rental property to the housing market, somebody wins, Bannon said, "But the people that lose are the renters who have a difficult time paying," he said.

Comments

Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Dec 13, 2020 at 10:08 am
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Dec 13, 2020 at 10:08 am

I feel bad for anyone who lost their job and can't make rent. I don't feel bad for those who are undocumented and don't qualify for unemployment or a stimulus check. There are consequences.


Nayeli
Registered user
Midtown
on Dec 13, 2020 at 4:01 pm
Nayeli, Midtown
Registered user
on Dec 13, 2020 at 4:01 pm

Is it true that some Palo Alto landlords -- including affordable housing -- are actually raising rents right now? I know someone who rents from Alta Housing (Palo Alto Housing Corporation). They showed me a letter that their rent actually increases 5% next month (for the next year). This is strange since Palo Alto's average rent has decreased 18%.

While I understand the yearly increases (rentals are businesses after all), it's baffling that anyone -- especially community-supported Alta Housing -- would actually RAISE rents right now. It seems like this would be the worst possible time to increase rent -- as so many units in the area are vacant.

I suppose that affordable housing rules might differ from supply/demand rules for units with typical market rates. I would have assumed that the rent for affordable housing would have been based upon the median local incomes and rent rates. Either way, since rent is collectively decreasing due to COVID and the workers leaving the area, it's strange that their family is now paying more.

Still, I think that the governor's anti-eviction moratorium for people out-of-work (or with substantially lower incomes due to COVID shutdowns) was a VERY bad idea. The tenants still owe that rent -- and the payment deadline is fast-approaching.

I think that there were better methods of helping renters during this era of COVID. Supplemental rent assistance might have been a much more viable means of helping such individuals. Unfortunately, the federal government decided to give EVERYONE -- working and not-working, rich and poor, homeowners and renters -- a stimulus. I think that the stimulus should have been saved for those out-of-work (or with reductions in pay).


YentaThe Renter
Registered user
College Terrace
on Dec 15, 2020 at 7:20 am
YentaThe Renter, College Terrace
Registered user
on Dec 15, 2020 at 7:20 am

Yo, neighbors: A one-time stimulus check does not pay much rent here! Undocumented, unemployed...Yes there will be consequences for all of us if we don’t care for all of us! Sad to read such prejudice from a neighbor in Palo Alto! Everybody gonna to have to tighten their belts, friends.


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Dec 15, 2020 at 7:44 am
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Dec 15, 2020 at 7:44 am
[email protected]
Registered user
Mountain View
on Dec 15, 2020 at 10:14 am
[email protected], Mountain View
Registered user
on Dec 15, 2020 at 10:14 am

Nayeli,

The real problem of giving landlords “supplemental rental assistance” is that it would only protect those landlords investments in a risky business that they have exploited for more than a decade.

COVID and AB5 have made a permanent change in the way the Tech industry is moving forward, there is a systemic relocation occurring regarding these Corporations and there is good reason for it.

For the past decade, the landlords used the shortage of housing to raise PRIVATE taxes (rents) because they claim that if their renters earn more money, they are entitled to a share of it. This was always a false plan, because housing is nothing but building a “housing unit” and providing services. They also claimed that if it wasn’t for their housing the Tech Industry would not have succeeded, it is simply not true. In fact, it was the opposite that happened, the “Tech” industry provided a major cash windfall on the housing markets.

Providing housing was never “computer science” or “rocket science”. It never provided any “innovative value”, the PEOPLE living there did and WORKED for it. This false logic forced wages to inflate to such a degree here that any decent excuse to get out of this region is good reason to do so for the Tech industry.

And now they have the exact reason, and no one can fault the Tech industry for it.

And now that COVID and AB5 are in the process of moving this “population” of the valley out, these landlords are now saying they are the victims. They are seeing all of their “preferred” customers relocating out. Leaving them with those that earn less, and are not the stable people they want.

The ugly truth is that housing is a very risky, but not very profitable market. Against all that the Real Estate industry sells to “mom and pop” landlords for “retirements” or “investments”. Real Estate Agents are NOT Investment Advisors, and no one should trust them in that area.

The GRIM reality is the rental market in the valley is undergoing a MAJOR shakeup, one that in the long run they should not expect to return to PreCOVID or AB5 levels soon, and maybe never.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 17, 2020 at 12:01 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 17, 2020 at 12:01 pm

[Portion removed.]

Note to people from other cities - the tax base of MV is totally different than the tax base of PA. The city councils, school systems are totally different. The available land within the city is different. The work/resident balance is totally different.

MV's big problem now is that the voters said remove the RV's from residential areas. And an advocacy group says slow down with the signs on the street that restrict parking. And they have brought in the ACLU. So now you have the universal problem of the residents - taxpayers expressing their wishes by a vote process and an advocacy group is lookin to overturn the voters. And the Advocacy Group is getting in the papers to establish tactical positions in this fight. I am sure with ACLU's advice. MV has assigned a location at Shoreline for RV's. Not Enough?

Goldy -tell us what is going on in your city. What are you advocating for your city? What are the solutions for your city? More ticky-tacky apartments?
Also note there is a Super Fund cite at Moffett which is being worked by the Navy and EPA. Edging the city onto Moffett is not going to work for housing.

PA's bay lands are not a choice due to flooding. MV's bay lands are also subject to flooding. A really good choice is for Google to move south-east through Gilroy towards Merced. They have land and a University. And new, less expensive houses are going up all over the place. Read the Real estate Section. Houses galore. Apartments galore. So Goldy - time for Silicon Valley Leadership Group and their advocates to "reimagine" where high tech is going. The "Larry" of Oracle lives in Lanai - he owns most of Lanai. The Zuck is busy buying up Kauai. Mr. Microsoft has a giant enclave on the big island, along with Mr. Dell and the Pelosi Family.


[email protected]
Registered user
Mountain View
on Dec 17, 2020 at 1:14 pm
[email protected], Mountain View
Registered user
on Dec 17, 2020 at 1:14 pm

[Portion removed.]

Just making an observation that applies to the entire area.

The Mountain View City Council is indeed very bad at land management. I am not a member of it nor an employee of the city.

From what I understand the pollution in Mountain View is actually more widespread than that. The CARB and the EPA are not monitoring the TCE vapors in the region because if it did turn out that TCE is in the ambient air here, it would possibly require relocating everything out of the valley.

My father was an expert in engineering the devices for ambient air monitoring, certified multiple devices for the EPA under the Clean Air Act, and the process of establishing the certification of clean air act standards. I worked with him for 4 years during high school in that area. So I have some idea, but I am not an expert.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 17, 2020 at 1:59 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 17, 2020 at 1:59 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 17, 2020 at 6:18 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 17, 2020 at 6:18 pm
[email protected]
Registered user
Mountain View
on Dec 17, 2020 at 8:15 pm
[email protected], Mountain View
Registered user
on Dec 17, 2020 at 8:15 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 17, 2020 at 9:24 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 17, 2020 at 9:24 pm
[email protected]
Registered user
Mountain View
on Dec 17, 2020 at 10:36 pm
[email protected], Mountain View
Registered user
on Dec 17, 2020 at 10:36 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 18, 2020 at 10:52 am
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 18, 2020 at 10:52 am

We have major papers - the San Francisco Chronicle and the San Jose Mercury News The Merc has been following the PA problem with a vengeance. And now it has moved on to the Mountain View RV problem with a vengeance. If you live in the bay area you have to be aware of what is going on throughout the bay area as it is a basis of comparison to what is happening directly in your city.

Real Estate purchases are a major item of note. They are continually telling you where the massive purchases are and who is making those purchases. And be aware that those major purchases are being made by companies that are out-of-state. While everyone is in lock-down the whole monopoly board is working away. CA is being sold out underneath us.

Local advocates are selling their own version of what is goin on. But the basis of comparison with other cities and locals is telling a different story. Home ownership, neighborhoods are under siege. The basis of comparison helps to push back on agendas that are no longer of benefit.


[email protected]
Registered user
Mountain View
on Dec 18, 2020 at 12:59 pm
[email protected], Mountain View
Registered user
on Dec 18, 2020 at 12:59 pm

Resident1,

Interesting you said:

"Local advocates are selling their own version of what is goin on. But the basis of comparison with other cities and locals is telling a different story. Home ownership, neighborhoods are under siege. The basis of comparison helps to push back on agendas that are no longer of benefit."

Benefit to who, or whom? It just appears that the "private property rights" team are only rooting for their own self interests. And that you cannot claim is false.

That "team" never understood the narrow scope of rights they have under the Federal and State constitutions. The real irony is that you technically don't own the land your home is on, that is why there is a property tax system. You are in effect a RENTER of the land, and if you don't pay your RENT you get evicted.

The only rights regarding private property under the constitutions are that the government cannot take you property for PUBLIC use without just compensation (Eminent Domain). The courts have allowed and will continue to allow for the TRANSFER of private ownership from one private party to another by government. Example, auctioning off your home to another party to pay for you unpaid property taxes. And remember the ew London Connecticut case Kelo v. New London (Web Link)

So many websites, lawyers, political lobbying groups, and individuals ARGUE that private property rights are under attack, they never existed in the first place in the way they describe them. It is nothing but a myth.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 18, 2020 at 3:12 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 18, 2020 at 3:12 pm
YentaThe Renter
Registered user
College Terrace
on Dec 18, 2020 at 5:16 pm
YentaThe Renter, College Terrace
Registered user
on Dec 18, 2020 at 5:16 pm

Enough already.There can be no debate: People need housing. Our "Bubble" is a disgrace. At the rate of this discussion, Silicon Valley will resemble Bangladesh with families on the street on cardboard. Build, build better, Better Build. Period.


[email protected]
Registered user
Mountain View
on Dec 18, 2020 at 5:17 pm
[email protected], Mountain View
Registered user
on Dec 18, 2020 at 5:17 pm
Longtime Resident
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Dec 22, 2020 at 1:15 am
Longtime Resident, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Dec 22, 2020 at 1:15 am

On many English language Asian real estate blogs and Mandarin WeChat sites, foreign landlord (investors) have been discussing how to squeeze rent out of their tenants, and worry about housing inventory - this is followed by where THEY can get free food handouts during the holidays.
These people make me sick with their greed.


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Dec 22, 2020 at 6:30 am
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Dec 22, 2020 at 6:30 am

>"...foreign landlord (investors) have been discussing how to squeeze rent out of their tenants, and worry about housing inventory - this is followed by where THEY can get free food handouts during the holidays."

^ It's a part of their culture...

Continued prosperity & a sense of 'sharing' are two noteworthy characteristics.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 22, 2020 at 11:22 am
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 22, 2020 at 11:22 am

I went on the Mountain View Voice concerning the RV debacle. Yes - this topic was there but no takers for the POV's. Interesting - I put in an opinion on the RV topic and they did not use the moniker I am using here. They used my email address as the reference point. Then my posting disappeared. That is a process issue with this publisher. Goldy appears as his real name in that publication. Lots of opinions from Goldy / Steven Goldstein.

The RV issue is very heated and has a lot of history. Some of that history is directly related to PA. Prior to Covid our County Supervisor had a meeting in which he wanted people to rent the space in front of their homes to RV people. This along with people living in cars to park in church parking lots. The requirement for a church to be open 24/7 for bathrooms would require church members to trade off who was on the property 24/7. Covid stepped in and that whole set of ideas was dismissed. This idea is part of a regional approach to RV's and people in cars.

My input was based on a morning TV show in which Goldy Hawn and her husband Curt Russell went on a RV trip across the country. They of course had a high end RV and stayed at RV parks which provide the amenities. Then they spent a lot of time on who does what in the RV - who empties the toilet. Curt's job. However that points up a delicate issue with the RV's that are not top of the line which are parked on ECR and residential streets of MV. What are the requirements of RV people who stay in a location. How is that being addressed? Note: this city needs to get very specific about what is happening there.

I then ventured down to Sunnyvale in the Moffett section - not a RV in site. The Sunnyvale Hilton closed with no signage. No cars anywhere, no RV's anywhere.
What becomes obvious here is that certain cities are sorted out to deal with these problems and other cities in this county are off-limit. Sunnyvale is the second biggest city in the county and the safest. They obviously have some pull in the county. Meanwhile the former mayor of MV is still pursuing the goals of RV's and people in cars. He is a well known individual in the area and is busy reaching out to other cities.
So the next time this topic comes up in PA it is being pushed by a larger group and our County Supervisor is aiding and abetting this group. As the "new" PACC council starts up this is an issue that will require total transparency at the city and county level. At least MV with their law suit now establishes the POV of the region.


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Dec 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Dec 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm

>"...the RV's that are not top of the line which are parked on ECR and residential streets of MV.

^ If the RVs were top-of-the-line luxury models, would you be more amenable to their presence on ECR?

Being an upscale city with a wealthy & educated populace, should Palo Alto run the ratty-looking RVs & their transient inhabitants out of town?


[email protected]
Registered user
Mountain View
on Dec 22, 2020 at 1:10 pm
[email protected], Mountain View
Registered user
on Dec 22, 2020 at 1:10 pm

Resident 1,

You way off topic in your comments.

The topic of this discussion is "In pandemic-induced renter's market, some Bay Area residents still struggle with rent"

Maybe you have something to discuss about it?

Are you suggesting that MORE RVs should be used to provide more affordable housing?

In any case, let's stick to the subject.

I just love it because the current rents are back to 2014 levels and are NOT likely to return to the bubble of 2019. And in fact it will likely continue to go down because of the continuing move out of Ca of the "Tech" contractors that cannot work here anymore unless they are transitioned to employees.

So many buying homes and buildings based on the "FEAR OF MISSING OUT" wave are about to wind up with property depreciation at a scale larger than 2007-2009. They thought it was "FREE" borrowing, so they simply paid whatever the Real Estate Agents wanted them to to make the highest commissions.

Like the one that bought my building in 2016 for 4.5 times its value, now he has to get a licenses inspector to determine that major repairs are going to have to be made on it. But the Real Estate market has always been manipulated just as Alan Greenspan said to congress years ago.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 22, 2020 at 1:18 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 22, 2020 at 1:18 pm

Lee - you are purposely missing the points here.

One point is the outflow of human waste. The cities are purposely ignoring and not dealing with that. People are renting the RV's to people who have in some cases non-existent skills regarding the movement of the RV's - the owners have to come move them on game days. If you read the Mountain View Voice on this topic the residents have multitudes of aggravations, including not knowing who the RV residents are. For some reason you are not suppose to ask who is on your street - invasion of privacy.

Point 2 - some cities have been targeted with dealing with this problem and others are not. We all recognize that. Have you seen any RV's in Los Altos? Los Altos Hills? Sunnyvale? RWC has RV's isolated in a commercial area next to 101. EPA has now blocked off RV parking on Bay Road going to the end point.

Point 3 - the county is looking to put RV's in residential locations vs county owned land. If the County has a policy then use county/city land to enact that policy. And provide the sanitary supplies / equipment to support people staying at that location.

Side note - I think someone is sleeping in their car on my street. And they leave when the paper deliveryman comes by before daybreak. There is always paper mess, now condoms on the street. Hey Man - that is not working. You can think up an idea but the reality of that idea goes in a different direction. So what is your address - we will help direct traffic to your place for a reality check.


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Dec 22, 2020 at 1:46 pm
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Dec 22, 2020 at 1:46 pm

>"I think someone is sleeping in their car on my street...There is always paper mess, now condoms on the street."

^ One person suspected of sleeping in a car on your street & now there are condoms scattered about? Given the amount of time it would normally take to turn a bunch of new ones into used ones during the course of an evening's 'sleep-over', you might have adequate time to report this dastardly street squatter while still in the act...then call 911 & let the PAPD take over as they are trained in dealing with these matters.


[email protected]
Registered user
Mountain View
on Dec 22, 2020 at 4:50 pm
[email protected], Mountain View
Registered user
on Dec 22, 2020 at 4:50 pm

Resident 1 just wants to distract the readers into discussing an off topic.

Probably because he or she cannot deal with this topic given the situation.

I am going to hate to say it but I enjoy the meltdown of the real estate and apartment industry as it continues to sink.

They were playing a game of monopoly with real money but the board just got shredded.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 22, 2020 at 6:49 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 22, 2020 at 6:49 pm

Goldy - this topic started on the MV Voice and no one took the bait. This is your favorite topic. Not so any one else. I think they know you well over there. It is not my topic - I have a house. I have not rented any residence since college. How old are you? I am laughing now.

Back to a topic that home owners need to address - who is on your street. Talked to the people who own the land where the parkers are and now we are on alert. The "Patrol" is now out.

As to the RV's on ECR - they are all dark. The people have left and the RV's are just sitting there? Are those all rental units? The Palo Alto Business Park is the place these need to go. With sanitation hook-ups.


[email protected]
Registered user
Mountain View
on Dec 22, 2020 at 9:00 pm
[email protected], Mountain View
Registered user
on Dec 22, 2020 at 9:00 pm

In response to Resident 1-Adobe Meadows you wrote:

“Goldy - this topic started on the MV Voice and no one took the bait. This is your favorite topic. Not so any one else. I think they know you well over there. It is not my topic - I have a house. I have not rented any residence since college. How old are you? I am laughing now.”

Actually, you are promoting the myth that home ownership is inherently a universal objective or requirement of being successful. That has been the biggest myth to survive in the U.S. In fact, there are so many reasons why a person might NEVER want to own a house.

And just to point out I have 2 Business Degrees from San Jose State U. I have shown competence in finance, marketing, economics among other disciplines.

The REALITY is that in many cases, one will choose NOT to own a home. For example, if the market is too shaky and is in another bubble, one may choose not to fall into a fool’s trap. Another is that they are so old that doing the work to maintain the home is too much work and it will cost too high to pay others to do so. It is sometimes smarter to let someone else bear the responsibility for that work.

But there you went again with a personal insult instead of discussing the topic which again is “In pandemic-induced renter's market, some Bay Area residents still struggle with rent”

You are simply again diverting from the topic, aren’t you?


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 23, 2020 at 2:07 am
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 23, 2020 at 2:07 am

This is an open forum. Anyone who wants to express their opinions is welcome to do so. Anyone with an interests can input data.

I suspect that Mountain View has a higher ratio of apartments to houses. Also suspect that the general population is younger. I also suspect that the people who generally post here live in homes. It is a generational difference. If we are to believe the real estate market then everyone is abandoning the "single life" of the city and buying homes to bring up a family. People want a yard and space. Life style is a choice. And choices change when you have children. All of the people who live around me have children and are here for the schools. Many then leave when the children finish school and get their own jobs and housing. People up size - then down size.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 23, 2020 at 11:25 am
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 23, 2020 at 11:25 am

There is some history here. Google is the main employer in MV. They originated the white buses who brought the workers from SF down to MV. And other companies used the same method of supporting their workers who lived out side the direct region.

The people living in SF are making a choice - being with other single high tech people, Having the good life going to restaurants and bars. The companies facilitated that choice. So now covid comes and now they are not on busses - they are working from home. - Where ever that is. That is one element of the issue - age, marital status, children, where to go to school. Another element is gentrification of the immediate areas - tear down old buildings and replace with new - bigger buildings. That is an on-going process, many times because the older building is no linger up to spec.

So the single person now gets married and wants to have children. They want a home with a yard. And the first home is usually in a less expensive section of a city - a starter home. Then as the parents progress in their careers they move up to a better home in a more expensive section of the cities. And they may move to other states and cities as their careers progress. And because they are young they are flexible and are able to navigate the particulars as to where they live. And their companies may help in that regard.

Bottom line - it is where you are in the process. That may - or may not be comparative to where everyone else is in the process. Every city is also in a process with businesses breaking down. Many elements in play.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 23, 2020 at 11:58 am
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 23, 2020 at 11:58 am

Who you work for is important. SU is building a second campus in RWC. There is a new hospital, a new apartment complex on Jefferson and El Camino. Another large area is being built at Woodside Road - a large complex that will include apartments. One could say that SU is assisting it's employees, it's students, and it's teaching staff that has extensive housing on campus.

Many large companies have bought buildings to house their employees with no signage. Many have negotiated reduced rates for their employees at selected locations.

The question for people looking for a job with the right qualifications is ask if the company has any "suggestions" on housing. the HR Departments usually have contacts with local housing at reduced rates. The company is subsidizing the difference.

There is a bottom line - if you are here then it is because you have a skill set that is in demand by the local companies. And they have a way of working their magic to help out.


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Dec 23, 2020 at 12:02 pm
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Dec 23, 2020 at 12:02 pm

>"I am going to hate to say it but I enjoy the meltdown of the real estate and apartment industry as it continues to sink."

^ Not complaining either & when it comes time to sell, no complaints.

As with anything, it's always best get in while the going's good & then get out when an opportune time arises.

There are many overseas buyers who can easily afford & desire to reside in CP and our house will eventually go the highest bidder regardless of their origins.


[email protected]
Registered user
Mountain View
on Dec 23, 2020 at 12:11 pm
[email protected], Mountain View
Registered user
on Dec 23, 2020 at 12:11 pm

In response to Resident 1 you wrote:

“So the single person now gets married and wants to have children.”

Really? Pew research indicates that the people getting married is down 8 percent and in fact only 50% of adults are married at all in this report “As U.S. marriage rate hovers at 50%, education gap in marital status widens “ (Web Link). In fact, many aren’t getting married at all and don’t want to. And with regards to children they are not having them either if you read this report “Americans aren't making enough babies to replace ourselves “ here (Web Link) You wrote:

“They want a home with a yard.”

That is also really not true only 60.6% owned homes according to the U.S. Census report titled “QUARTERLY RESIDENTIAL VACANCIES AND HOMEOWNERSHIP, THIRD QUARTER 2020” here (Web Link). That is only 10% above half of the population. Also, we are on a downward trend, we are currently below the levels we had in both 2004 and the great recession. You really are making a lot of assumptions, or more importantly trying to make it look like it is a safe investment to buy a house. The facts are we might be starting a population decrease in the U.S. that unless we get immigration to fill the loss, demand for ownership housing is not on a stable path, it is on track to start to permanently go down.

You are basing your opinion on a very outdated model.

In the end there are possibly going to be a lot of investors that built condos and housing, or bought them under the FOMO wave because of the current interest rates, that are about to actually get walloped.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 23, 2020 at 9:16 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 23, 2020 at 9:16 pm

The demand for housing in CA - peninsula is going down because people are moving out of state or to other cities / states that have a lower cost of living. Many going to Florida where the cost of housing is going up. Idaho has a influx of population. Texas is now on the upswing for population growth. CA is not so popular right now.

If you read the Real estate Section of the paper it shows where all of the new housing is being built. Builders are using models that predict where population growth is anticipated.

A focus on the above comment is to increase immigration to save the builders from loss on their investments? Got it.


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Dec 24, 2020 at 8:14 am
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Dec 24, 2020 at 8:14 am

>"The demand for housing in CA - peninsula is going down because people are moving out of state or to other cities / states that have a lower cost of living....CA is not so popular right now."

^ Demographically, this migration to regions outside of CA has been going on for awhile...mostly white folks from both professional & working class backgrounds.

The SF Bay Area has experienced a remarkable increase in home ownership among those from other countries, most notably the PRC and India...many of whom are health care & high-tech professionals with good incomes.

The have/have not affordable housing issues & problems will continue on the peninsula for decades to come as only ownership factors may shift over time to a preponderance of new home owners from abroad...especially in the nicer neighborhoods & cities.

And if they can afford to, more power to them as RE agents will continue to tout the benefits of residing in this area thus keeping PRIME residential properties at their optimum asking price levels for those who can either afford to pay CASH or meet high monthly mortgage rates, not to mention exorbitant post Prop 13 residential property taxes.

No complaints from a future home seller as it shouldn't be anyone's concern who resides here after one has packed-up and left.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 26, 2020 at 2:37 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 26, 2020 at 2:37 pm

Excellent article today in the SJM/BAN - "Aberration or a new normal for employees?" This is a very comprehensive article on the topic at hand and covers all of the contingencies available. Keep in mind that many of the employees in the valley live outside the valley and come in on busses. All of those bus riders are now hunkered down in their residences and hopefully working from home. They are saving the commute time and are vey happy doing that. Companies are also saving.


[email protected]
Registered user
Mountain View
on Dec 26, 2020 at 6:12 pm
[email protected], Mountain View
Registered user
on Dec 26, 2020 at 6:12 pm

Resident 1,

I am sorry but I don't agree with the article "Manjoo: Why should we return to living and working so close together? " (Web Link).

Given our technology, and the current risks of densely populated areas enabling viral spreads, the lack of affordable housing, and the problems with environmental quality, cities I think are time to be made obsolete.

Especially the Bay area because of so much pollution, even spare the air days occurring year round.

The Bay area need to get an understanding, it is going to have to improve on the above, or accept that it is going to start a systemic decline.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 27, 2020 at 10:08 am
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 27, 2020 at 10:08 am

Mr. Manjoo's articles appear in the Opinion Section. He is a New York Times opinion writer. Anything that comes out of the NYT is east coast oriented and to the far left. That is not the article I referenced. The article I referenced is not an opinion - it is a report on what is going in the bay area - Matt Levin - Calmatters.
The Calmatters are spot on and fairly accurate - whether you have the same opinion or not.


[email protected]
Registered user
Mountain View
on Dec 27, 2020 at 5:23 pm
[email protected], Mountain View
Registered user
on Dec 27, 2020 at 5:23 pm

I just saw that only 2,000,000 doses of vaccine were delivered and administered so far on CNN.

Everyone said there would be 20,000,000 by the end of the month.

If this trend continues, the projections made are not even going to be close. they barely reached 10% of the projection in December.

If it urns out that the production is that slow or the supply chains cannot achieve even 50% of the projection, the vaccination program will double in time length, and that is if the vaccines prove safe and effective.

Imagine if only say 25,000,000 people get vaccinated by July of next year and only 50,000,000 by the end of the year? The Movie Contagion predicted this problem, and Trump and the like simply said, of we got this we just spend enough and we can do better.

It looks like that even if 2 more vaccines come on the market the best we might achieve is 100,000,000 people vaccinated by the end of 2021, Since there are 330,000,000 people in the U.S. that means it will be at least 2 years before we can approach enough people to START returning to normal, right?


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 28, 2020 at 11:39 am
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 28, 2020 at 11:39 am

The San Francisco Chronicle 12/28 has an extensive article on this topic and notes where housing is being built and by who - "S.F. must wait out housing downturn".
Note that the whole groups of people who come here to work on buses are living in the city because they like the single-life vibe - bars, restaurants, things to do. Then they get married, have children, and took for homes with yards - so off to suburbia.

Suburbia comes in all forms and packages. San Jose qualifies as a single-life hot spot in the downtown by San Jose State and has a lot of neighborhoods noted in the Real estate section of the papers. Also stadiums for the Sharks, Soccer, SJ Football.

We have to not let us get "schooled" into thinking that the world turns on this city and we have to turn ourselves into a bee-hive to save the rest of the bay area. We need to perfect our "suburbia" classification. Watch out who is trying to school us and why. It is a big worlds out there and a lot of it has more going on then we do. SU is a tourist attraction but they have their student housing set up and are very protective of who is on campus and why.


[email protected]
Registered user
Mountain View
on Dec 28, 2020 at 1:13 pm
[email protected], Mountain View
Registered user
on Dec 28, 2020 at 1:13 pm

REsident 1,

You ight want to read the article titled "San Francisco’s housing market has been chaotic. Here’s what experts see coming in 2021" here (Web Link)

I keep on pointing out that no one should expect things to "turn around" in 1 year.

However it looks like the builders are finally choosing to build affordable housing and stop gambling on high end units.

We cannot count the chickens before they are hatched. In fact the eggs haven't been laid yet.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 28, 2020 at 3:24 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Dec 28, 2020 at 3:24 pm

Goldy - I am addressing my comments to everyone at this point because everyone is being pressured by the "voices" out there and need to assess the information that is available now. You can address your comments to everyone -okay? I am not a decision maker - I am an opinion like every other opinion. But I put my opinions out there to inform the policy makers that the residents are engaged in this issue.

Decision makers have a bad habit of cherry picking "facts" to push their agenda. And people need to poke holes in those "facts". You live in Mountain View. You are cherry picking your facts to support your theories. Those choices are generational, societal, economical, and business related. You work for someone - and whoever is helping form your position on topics. Everyone here is fair game.


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