News

Meet Palo Alto's new generation of #MeToo activists

Youth mobilize on social media to raise awareness of Title IX rights

Gunn High School senior Rachel Sun, center, marches with other students on Oct. 11 to Supervisor Joe Simitian's house to press him to support a Santa Clara County-wide audit of schools' Title IX compliance. Courtesy Lam Nguyen.

Anna was a 15-year-old Gunn High School student when her then-boyfriend sexually assaulted her in a campus bathroom.

She had never heard of Title IX, the federal anti-discrimination law that protects students' right to an education free of harassment. She couldn't process what had happened to her, let alone answer the three male administrators who questioned her in the school office immediately afterward. She felt unsafe and alone, and as her mental health degraded, she attempted suicide.

This summer, Anna, whose name has been changed to protect her privacy, started an Instagram account devoted to sharing anonymous stories of Palo Alto students who have experienced sexual violence and harassment. The stories — of a girl who was raped while too drunk to consent, of another who reported a teacher for making inappropriate comments about her body, and of another who was asked "What kind of clothes were you wearing?" — are at once heartbreaking and comforting for Anna, who wishes sexual assault had been talked about more openly when she was at Gunn.

"I felt like I needed to make sure that people had a voice," said the 2020 Gunn graduate. "I think seeing that we're not alone was really important for me."

Anna is part of a new wave of local young Title IX activists who during the pandemic have used social media and socially distanced protests to press for reform and raise awareness about youth sexual violence in Palo Alto. The Instagram page Anna created, metoopaloalto, was inspired by one started by Los Gatos High School students this summer. She watched as one student's disclosure of a rape on Instagram prompted dozens of students to come forward with their own experiences with sexual violence. The Los Gatos Instagram account is now as much a resource page as it is a platform for survivors to feel heard and seen.

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In May, Gunn senior Rachel Sun formed a student club dedicated to creating policies to protect survivors of sexual harassment and violence. She runs Instagram and Facebook pages where students discuss local and federal Title IX policies and changes they'd like to see their schools make.

Gunn High School senior Rachel Sun marches in Palo Alto with other students rallying for a review of schools' Title IX compliance across Santa Clara County on Oct. 11. Courtesy Lam Nguyen.

Sun was first moved to advocacy by outrage at President Donald Trump administration's new Title IX regulations, which took effect this summer and were widely criticized by survivor advocates as tipping the balance toward those accused of sexual assault.

"I started just posting on social media, 'Is there anything that can be done?' I was waiting for someone else to be like, 'I already do this advocacy thing so you can stop now.' But then no one did that so I just had to keep going," Sun said.

Sun's club focused this fall on lobbying the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors to review local K-12 public and private schools, community colleges and universities' compliance with Title IX and other laws related to sexual harassment and violence. Dozens of local high school and Stanford University students and advocates gave more than two hours of public testimony at a September Board of Supervisors meeting, some describing their own assaults and frustration with the Title IX process at their schools. The YWCA of Silicon Valley, Next Door Solutions, Asian Americans for Community Involvement (AACI), Maitri, Law Foundation, Community Solutions and the Asian Law Alliance wrote a joint letter urging passage of the countywide review, which they said would for the first time "make it possible to identify gaps in policies that can adversely impact the right to have an education free from harassment and violence."

The local students' representative on the county board, Supervisor Joe Simitian, asked county staff to conduct outreach and include input from stakeholders at the local, state and federal level rather than approve the review as presented. Frustrated by the delay, Sun and other students organized a protest, marching from Duveneck Elementary School to Simitian's home. They wore all black and masks with the word "listen" and sat cross-legged in the street in silent protest.

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"It felt really empowering to go to Simitian's house and demand that he actually listen to us," Sun said.

The next month, the Board of Supervisors unanimously approved the review, which is expected to take up to a year and a half to complete. At Simitian's request, they allocated $1 million — double the proposed funding — for the audit.

Local students held a socially distanced protest in October to press the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors to approve a review of schools' Title IX compliance. Courtesy Lam Nguyen.

"The moment an academic institution fails to comply with state and federal sex discrimination laws and laws, rules, and regulations addressing sexual and intimate partner violence and stalking — be it through poorly crafted policies or failure to enforce policies, we have failed our learners," a staff report on the county review states. "Students have the right to an education free from harassment and/or violence and academic institutions bear the responsibility of fostering such an environment through comprehensive policies and just enforcement."

Palo Alto Unified for years struggled with Title IX compliance and culture, particularly at the high schools. In 2013, Palo High School's Verde Magazine's often-cited "rape culture" article shook the school community and prompted a yearslong federal Office of Civil Rights investigation that ultimately found the district violated both federal law and its own policies and procedures in numerous cases. This and other developments eventually led to the hiring of the district's first-ever full-time Title IX coordinator, new consent education, a district task force focused on ending sexual assault and an unprecedented number of reports of sexual violence, gender and racial discrimination and other forms of harassment.

Sun said she feels lucky to be in a district with a more intense focus on Title IX in comparison to other local schools.

"But I think also the bar is very low. To say my district is following the law so we're doing great is kind of disappointing," she said. "That being said, I think Palo Alto does make efforts to try and consistently improve. I'm glad they are receptive to that."

Anna said she hopes school and district administrators see the metoopaloalto account and reflect on how their handling of a Title IX report can impact a student's mental health.

"I want them to understand that they have a significant role in how a victim processes what happens to them," she said.

Local students held a socially distanced protest in October to press the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors to approve a review of schools' Title IX compliance. Courtesy Lam Nguyen.

Sun said many students are still unaware of their rights under Title IX and what to do if they're sexually assaulted or harassed. With the schools closed, she's also concerned that students are less likely to tell a trusted teacher if they're assaulted. She wants the district to post Title IX resources and policies in a clear, noticeable place on school websites.

As of early November, there have been 13 reports of sexual harassment and discrimination this school year, including two cases at Gunn and five at Paly, according to the district's Uniform Complaint Procedure (UCP) report.

Sun strongly believes that the district's consent education should be more nuanced and engaging — especially given not all students are fully on board with preventing sexual violence, she said.

"There are a lot of young women especially who are very interested in preventing rape culture from persisting and making sure that survivors feel safe at school. But there are also a lot of people who think that girls are being dramatic and that it's not really a big issue," Sun said. "People treat it as kind of a turn-off if you're interested in these things."

Kayla Stitt, a recent Palo Alto High School graduate who helps run the metoopaloalto Instagram, said it's not the norm among teenagers to talk about consent and sexual assault. That's why she and others feel so passionate about the account.

"Pages like this, which allow for people to share their stories, to see how common it is, will definitely allow for more conversations," she said.

On Dec. 8, the Palo Alto Unified school board is holding a Title IX "listening session" at the request of Trustee Ken Dauber. He said he wants the board and district to hear directly from students, including these activists, who have expressed concerns about Title IX in recent months.

"While the district has made great strides in Title IX compliance and supporting students who have experienced sexual harassment and assault, there's always room for improvement," Dauber said. "There's nothing more valuable than hearing from students about their experience."

Resources where survivors can get help:

• National Sexual Assault Hotline: 800-656-HOPE (4673) and 24/7 chat: hotline.rainn.org/online.

• Crisis Text Line: Text 741741 to connect with a crisis counselor.

• PAUSD Title IX information: pausd.org/about-us/policies-procedures/title-ix-office.

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Meet Palo Alto's new generation of #MeToo activists

Youth mobilize on social media to raise awareness of Title IX rights

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Fri, Nov 13, 2020, 6:52 am

Anna was a 15-year-old Gunn High School student when her then-boyfriend sexually assaulted her in a campus bathroom.

She had never heard of Title IX, the federal anti-discrimination law that protects students' right to an education free of harassment. She couldn't process what had happened to her, let alone answer the three male administrators who questioned her in the school office immediately afterward. She felt unsafe and alone, and as her mental health degraded, she attempted suicide.

This summer, Anna, whose name has been changed to protect her privacy, started an Instagram account devoted to sharing anonymous stories of Palo Alto students who have experienced sexual violence and harassment. The stories — of a girl who was raped while too drunk to consent, of another who reported a teacher for making inappropriate comments about her body, and of another who was asked "What kind of clothes were you wearing?" — are at once heartbreaking and comforting for Anna, who wishes sexual assault had been talked about more openly when she was at Gunn.

"I felt like I needed to make sure that people had a voice," said the 2020 Gunn graduate. "I think seeing that we're not alone was really important for me."

Anna is part of a new wave of local young Title IX activists who during the pandemic have used social media and socially distanced protests to press for reform and raise awareness about youth sexual violence in Palo Alto. The Instagram page Anna created, metoopaloalto, was inspired by one started by Los Gatos High School students this summer. She watched as one student's disclosure of a rape on Instagram prompted dozens of students to come forward with their own experiences with sexual violence. The Los Gatos Instagram account is now as much a resource page as it is a platform for survivors to feel heard and seen.

In May, Gunn senior Rachel Sun formed a student club dedicated to creating policies to protect survivors of sexual harassment and violence. She runs Instagram and Facebook pages where students discuss local and federal Title IX policies and changes they'd like to see their schools make.

Sun was first moved to advocacy by outrage at President Donald Trump administration's new Title IX regulations, which took effect this summer and were widely criticized by survivor advocates as tipping the balance toward those accused of sexual assault.

"I started just posting on social media, 'Is there anything that can be done?' I was waiting for someone else to be like, 'I already do this advocacy thing so you can stop now.' But then no one did that so I just had to keep going," Sun said.

Sun's club focused this fall on lobbying the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors to review local K-12 public and private schools, community colleges and universities' compliance with Title IX and other laws related to sexual harassment and violence. Dozens of local high school and Stanford University students and advocates gave more than two hours of public testimony at a September Board of Supervisors meeting, some describing their own assaults and frustration with the Title IX process at their schools. The YWCA of Silicon Valley, Next Door Solutions, Asian Americans for Community Involvement (AACI), Maitri, Law Foundation, Community Solutions and the Asian Law Alliance wrote a joint letter urging passage of the countywide review, which they said would for the first time "make it possible to identify gaps in policies that can adversely impact the right to have an education free from harassment and violence."

The local students' representative on the county board, Supervisor Joe Simitian, asked county staff to conduct outreach and include input from stakeholders at the local, state and federal level rather than approve the review as presented. Frustrated by the delay, Sun and other students organized a protest, marching from Duveneck Elementary School to Simitian's home. They wore all black and masks with the word "listen" and sat cross-legged in the street in silent protest.

"It felt really empowering to go to Simitian's house and demand that he actually listen to us," Sun said.

The next month, the Board of Supervisors unanimously approved the review, which is expected to take up to a year and a half to complete. At Simitian's request, they allocated $1 million — double the proposed funding — for the audit.

"The moment an academic institution fails to comply with state and federal sex discrimination laws and laws, rules, and regulations addressing sexual and intimate partner violence and stalking — be it through poorly crafted policies or failure to enforce policies, we have failed our learners," a staff report on the county review states. "Students have the right to an education free from harassment and/or violence and academic institutions bear the responsibility of fostering such an environment through comprehensive policies and just enforcement."

Palo Alto Unified for years struggled with Title IX compliance and culture, particularly at the high schools. In 2013, Palo High School's Verde Magazine's often-cited "rape culture" article shook the school community and prompted a yearslong federal Office of Civil Rights investigation that ultimately found the district violated both federal law and its own policies and procedures in numerous cases. This and other developments eventually led to the hiring of the district's first-ever full-time Title IX coordinator, new consent education, a district task force focused on ending sexual assault and an unprecedented number of reports of sexual violence, gender and racial discrimination and other forms of harassment.

Sun said she feels lucky to be in a district with a more intense focus on Title IX in comparison to other local schools.

"But I think also the bar is very low. To say my district is following the law so we're doing great is kind of disappointing," she said. "That being said, I think Palo Alto does make efforts to try and consistently improve. I'm glad they are receptive to that."

Anna said she hopes school and district administrators see the metoopaloalto account and reflect on how their handling of a Title IX report can impact a student's mental health.

"I want them to understand that they have a significant role in how a victim processes what happens to them," she said.

Sun said many students are still unaware of their rights under Title IX and what to do if they're sexually assaulted or harassed. With the schools closed, she's also concerned that students are less likely to tell a trusted teacher if they're assaulted. She wants the district to post Title IX resources and policies in a clear, noticeable place on school websites.

As of early November, there have been 13 reports of sexual harassment and discrimination this school year, including two cases at Gunn and five at Paly, according to the district's Uniform Complaint Procedure (UCP) report.

Sun strongly believes that the district's consent education should be more nuanced and engaging — especially given not all students are fully on board with preventing sexual violence, she said.

"There are a lot of young women especially who are very interested in preventing rape culture from persisting and making sure that survivors feel safe at school. But there are also a lot of people who think that girls are being dramatic and that it's not really a big issue," Sun said. "People treat it as kind of a turn-off if you're interested in these things."

Kayla Stitt, a recent Palo Alto High School graduate who helps run the metoopaloalto Instagram, said it's not the norm among teenagers to talk about consent and sexual assault. That's why she and others feel so passionate about the account.

"Pages like this, which allow for people to share their stories, to see how common it is, will definitely allow for more conversations," she said.

On Dec. 8, the Palo Alto Unified school board is holding a Title IX "listening session" at the request of Trustee Ken Dauber. He said he wants the board and district to hear directly from students, including these activists, who have expressed concerns about Title IX in recent months.

"While the district has made great strides in Title IX compliance and supporting students who have experienced sexual harassment and assault, there's always room for improvement," Dauber said. "There's nothing more valuable than hearing from students about their experience."

Resources where survivors can get help:

• National Sexual Assault Hotline: 800-656-HOPE (4673) and 24/7 chat: hotline.rainn.org/online.

• Crisis Text Line: Text 741741 to connect with a crisis counselor.

• PAUSD Title IX information: pausd.org/about-us/policies-procedures/title-ix-office.

Comments

Squidsie
Registered user
another community
on Nov 13, 2020 at 9:31 am
Squidsie, another community
Registered user
on Nov 13, 2020 at 9:31 am
59 people like this

As an organization, #MeToo lost its credibility when it allowed itself to be used as a political weapon limited to convenient targets, and forfeited its original principles. The failure to react to credible allegations against Joe Biden, after having actively attacked Brett Kavanaugh over far less credible charges - proclaiming "the accuser must be believed" - revealed the group as just another partisan tool.


Screeedek
Registered user
Stanford
on Nov 13, 2020 at 11:10 am
Screeedek, Stanford
Registered user
on Nov 13, 2020 at 11:10 am
38 people like this

While I absolutely detest Betsy Devos, her approach to Title IX was long overdue. The code enforcement at Universities during the previous administration threw due process out the window. Accused college students were left with no recourse to confront their accusers or even to defend themselves. In one incident, a male college student in Oregon was forced to leave his housing arrangement and his on-campus job but was not told why. After he secured an attorney, it was found that a female student objected to his presence because he resembled someone who had assaulted her 3,000 miles away!


Online Name
Registered user
Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Nov 13, 2020 at 11:15 am
Online Name, Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
Registered user
on Nov 13, 2020 at 11:15 am
20 people like this

Joe Biden?? Was he palling around with Epstein, too? And what about the 22+ suits against Trump some of them complete with DNA?


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 13, 2020 at 11:27 am
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 13, 2020 at 11:27 am
60 people like this

>"#MeToo lost its credibility when it allowed itself to be used as a political weapon limited to convenient targets...proclaiming "the accuser must be believed."

>"Accused college students were left with no recourse to confront their accusers or even to defend themselves."

^ The last time I checked...in America, the burden of proof rests with the accuser.

That said, what's to prevent a 'woman scorned' from retaliating against a disinterested male via false allegations?

Bottom line...all bases must be covered to reveal the actual truth of the matter.


Educator
Registered user
Midtown
on Nov 13, 2020 at 11:45 am
Educator, Midtown
Registered user
on Nov 13, 2020 at 11:45 am
9 people like this

Screeedek- that sounds false. Can you provide evidence of your story? Thank you.


cmarg
Registered user
Palo Alto High School
on Nov 13, 2020 at 1:31 pm
cmarg, Palo Alto High School
Registered user
on Nov 13, 2020 at 1:31 pm
19 people like this

I am hopeful that both sides of the story are always shared. In addition to women, remember boys/mens are also sexually abused. The challenge is that if they say anything, they are considered to be odd. This entire area of sexual education needs to be addressed and remember that there are always 2 sides - it is not always the male's fault. Not saying that many men are not at fault, just that women are also at fault sometimes.


Samuel L
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Nov 13, 2020 at 2:04 pm
Samuel L, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Nov 13, 2020 at 2:04 pm
15 people like this

@cmarg - please explain what you mean by "at fault" as it relates to either men or women being assaulted/raped. I would love to hear how anyone being raped can be "at fault". But, I eagerly await your explanation.


cmarg
Registered user
Palo Alto High School
on Nov 14, 2020 at 10:47 am
cmarg, Palo Alto High School
Registered user
on Nov 14, 2020 at 10:47 am
7 people like this

Samuel, great question. It seems that the blame always goes to the male when something sexual happens. So, what I am saying is that the fault goes to the male automatically when in fact it could be the woman. Rape/assault is not something that should be taken lightly. As we all know, it takes two however in assault situations, only one is at fault and should be reported and penalized for their serious offense to the other person. I am mainly representing my feelings as it relates to middle school and high school students. There needs to be a lot of education on NO means NO for both males and females. Hope that gives some clarity.


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 14, 2020 at 11:10 am
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 14, 2020 at 11:10 am
32 people like this

>"There needs to be a lot of education on NO means NO for both males and females."

^ Concurring...mutual CONSENT is the key determinant in these contested matters.

A problem that often arises is when drugs and/or alcohol enter the picture...then the consent factor becomes a gray zone.


Protest to be IN School First
Registered user
Midtown
on Nov 14, 2020 at 11:37 am
Protest to be IN School First, Midtown
Registered user
on Nov 14, 2020 at 11:37 am
14 people like this

Ironic. These students, ALL Gunn and Palo Alto High School students, should be marching and protesting that the schools are closed and no one is getting a decent education!!! They're not even IN school now so this march makes no sense! There are only 7 states in the entire nation with schools closed and we are one of them. All other states schools are open, and even locked down countries in Europe have vowed to keep schools open because closing them is a public health emergency in and of itself. If these students were really concerned about fair and just treatment, they'd be marching to open the schools based on the social justice issues as a result of them being closed: suicides (yes there have been at least two that NO ONE is talking about!), suicide attempts (skyrocketing), loneliness, depression, students who counselors were working with to be the first in their family to go to college who have dropped out of high school because of distance learning isn't working/isn't possible for them (yes, there are several), widens the acheivement gap for those who are already struggling. For crying out loud, PROTEST TO BE IN SCHOOL IN PERSON before you protest about what happens there!


Samuel L
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Nov 14, 2020 at 11:40 am
Samuel L, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Nov 14, 2020 at 11:40 am
9 people like this

@cmarg - I still don't hear an explanation there. You said that "the blame always goes to the male when something sexual happens" If a female is raped/assaulted, please tell me how she could be "at fault". After that, please let me know how many males have been raped/assaulted by females.


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 14, 2020 at 12:31 pm
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 14, 2020 at 12:31 pm
22 people like this

>"...please let me know how many males have been raped/assaulted by females."

^ Not sure if the enclosed URL holds any water but perhaps food for thought...

Web Link


cmarg
Registered user
Palo Alto High School
on Nov 14, 2020 at 1:37 pm
cmarg, Palo Alto High School
Registered user
on Nov 14, 2020 at 1:37 pm
12 people like this

Samuel, first, I am guessing you are a male. I am female. So, not 100% that you know the push and pull of teenage relationships as it relates to being female. I am talking about males getting blamed for times when the female actually initiates a sexual encounter and then says it was the male pushing themselves on the female. Also, there are times when the female initiates sex and then changes their mind. Most males, not all, will stop when someone says stop, even when the female initiated everything.

For your second question, looks like Lee gave you a link. I have gone to lectures and ask about the number of men raped. There is a large percentage but it is really looked upon as there being something wrong with the male -- like why wouldn't you want sex? You're male and that is the way males just are, very interested in sex all the time. Stereotyping basically.

So, seems like there is lots of stereotyping going on here with only females being the victim. Please think about it and perhaps do some research. It is about educating everyone and not saying groups of people are always the victim and the other group is always the perpetrator.


Ardan Michael Blum
Registered user
Downtown North
on Nov 15, 2020 at 12:31 am
Ardan Michael Blum, Downtown North
Registered user
on Nov 15, 2020 at 12:31 am
231 people like this

So many people rushed to conclusions about a friend of mine. His Palo Alto high school mural was painted over. Even now people think he is a predator. No court has ever stated agreement. Shame on the radicals who spew hate masked in metoo.


Mom
Registered user
Barron Park
on Nov 15, 2020 at 2:57 pm
Mom, Barron Park
Registered user
on Nov 15, 2020 at 2:57 pm
24 people like this

@Arden: James Franco has been accused by many OF HIS STUDENTS of sexual misconduct. He is not an appropriate role model for our students. That's why his mural is gone and it should be gone.

Web Link

"Tither-Kaplan is one of five women who, in interviews with The Times, accused Franco, 39, of behavior they found to be inappropriate or sexually exploitative. Four were his students, and another said he was her mentor."


Squidsie
Registered user
another community
on Nov 15, 2020 at 3:13 pm
Squidsie, another community
Registered user
on Nov 15, 2020 at 3:13 pm
5 people like this

@Samuel. I agree that the rape of a man by a woman, in the sense that it involves involuntary sex, is physiologically improbable. However, rape is often charged when a couple willingly engages in sex, but because one of them is impaired by drugs or alcohol, they are deemed legally incapable of giving consent. My concern is situations in which BOTH parties are substantially impaired by drugs and/or alcohol and willingly engage in sex, why is only the man charged with rape?


Mom
Registered user
Barron Park
on Nov 15, 2020 at 3:14 pm
Mom, Barron Park
Registered user
on Nov 15, 2020 at 3:14 pm
26 people like this

Here's your buddy James Franco trying to pick up a teenage girl on the internet. He was 35 at the time and laughed it off as "the embarrassing rituals of meeting someone" which is really disturbing. Web Link

Web Link

I wish we could paint over it a second time.


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 15, 2020 at 4:18 pm
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 15, 2020 at 4:18 pm
32 people like this

@Mom
Curious...despite his'mural' being painted over & in light of your clear-cut documentation, how did this particular individual manage to secure a 'like' response of 152?


Mom
Registered user
Barron Park
on Nov 15, 2020 at 5:12 pm
Mom, Barron Park
Registered user
on Nov 15, 2020 at 5:12 pm
22 people like this

I guess famous movie stars get a lot of likes. Do you find that surprising?


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 15, 2020 at 6:38 pm
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 15, 2020 at 6:38 pm
24 people like this

>"I guess famous movie stars get a lot of likes. Do you find that surprising?"

^ Disheartening at best as no one is above the law when it comes to common decency towards others.

We are all accountable for our misdeeds (if any) including celebrities.


CovidKid
Registered user
Mountain View
on Nov 16, 2020 at 8:29 am
CovidKid, Mountain View
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 8:29 am
7 people like this

#Educator midtown

Male Oregon student banned from campus because of a resemblance of a previous sexual assault claimed by one woman.

Web Link


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 16, 2020 at 3:41 pm
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 3:41 pm
21 people like this

>"Male Oregon student banned from campus because of a resemblance of a previous sexual assault claimed by one woman."

^ Everybody (or most everybody) resembles somebody else in general appearance(s)...just ask any person color who has been stopped by the PD for questioning.

Fingerprint scans and/or DNA confirmation could have alleviated this university decision.


Ardan Michael Blum
Registered user
Downtown North
on Nov 18, 2020 at 11:46 am
Ardan Michael Blum, Downtown North
Registered user
on Nov 18, 2020 at 11:46 am
88 people like this

@Mom: I have to come back as your statements are exactly why the likes are not for a Hollywood star. They are for being tired of being told who is who and who to admire this week and next.


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