News

Protesters demanding justice for Breonna Taylor stop traffic in Menlo Park

Bay Area residents speak out days after grand jury decision in Louisville killing

Etika Fifita holds her fist in the air in support of the Black Lives Matter movement alongside other protesters blocking traffic at the intersection of Menlo and Ravenswood Avenue and El Camino Real in Menlo Park on Sept. 25. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

More than 150 people from around the Bay Area gathered Friday evening in Menlo Park in a protest that called for justice in the police killing of Breonna Taylor and pushed for reform in the Menlo Park Police Department.

Taylor, a 26-year-old Black medical worker, was killed in her apartment by police in Louisville, Kentucky while they executed a search warrant in March. On Wednesday, Sept. 23, a grand jury's decision was announced: Of three officers who fired shots, only one, who had been dismissed from the force, was indicted for "wanton endangerment," or recklessly firing his gun. None were charged for causing Taylor's death, according to the New York Times.

In response, protests have flared up around the U.S.

In Menlo Park, Friday's protest organized to demand justice for Breonna Taylor, according to event flyers, was organized by East Palo Alto-based art and activism collective Tha Hood Squad and Mountain View and Los Altos-based anti-racism organization Justice Vanguard.

The rally began around 6 p.m., when attendees gathered in the plaza in front of Kepler's Books and Cafe Borrone before marching to the Menlo Park Civic Center, where they stood and chanted at various locations around the Police Department headquarters before returning to the plaza.

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During their march, they stopped twice in the middle of the intersection of El Camino Real and Ravenswood and Menlo avenues for an extended period of time. Vehicles formed a line along El Camino Real, and some honked in annoyance.

A protester supporting the Black Lives Matter movement holds up a sign to drivers stuck at the intersection of Menlo and Ravenswood avenues and El Camino Real in Menlo Park on Sept. 25. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

Seth Donnelly, who teaches at Los Altos High School and has been involved with the Justice Vanguard and Tha Hood Squad, said that their protest was held in Menlo Park in an effort to establish a "culture of resistance" throughout the Peninsula, and to call specific attention to the Menlo Park Police Department and its policing practices with Black and Latinx people.

While the group's action to stop traffic at a critical intersection was somewhat spontaneous, he added, "Society itself needs to understand that it's not business as usual as long as business as usual is the murder of Black people and business as usual is the perpetuation of white supremacy. … We need to understand that society itself needs to be interrupted in its normal function."

Black Lives Matter protesters assemble outside the Menlo Park Police Department on Sept. 25. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

Protesters carried signs bearing statements such as "Silence is violence," "No more Black death" and "No Justice No Peace" and shouted chants like "Same story every time / Being Black is not a crime."

"It's a shame that this is happening over and over again," said protest organizer JT Faraji, a longtime critic of Menlo Park police and founder of Tha Hood Squad. "We have to do something about it."

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He spoke about policing practices in Menlo Park, including the city's acceptance of funds from Facebook to pay for police services.

"It's only a matter of time before we have our own Breonna Taylor. It's only a matter of time before we have our own George Floyd," he said. "We can no longer assume, hope and pray the system will fix itself."

At the midpoint of the protests, attendees gathered at the rear of the Menlo Park police station and shouted "Quit your job," and "No good cops in a racist system."

A number of protesters this news organization spoke with said they came from communities outside Menlo Park to participate.

Desiree Sakal, a Hayward resident, said she was not surprised by the grand jury verdict in the Breonna Taylor case. Accompanying her was Chelsey Monroe from San Francisco, who added that she was there because, as a Black woman, she felt so much grief at the decision and felt the only way to release that sadness was to participate with others in the protest.

Sequoia High School student and Redwood City resident Ray Evans said he was concerned about the idea that corporate-funded police departments could expand beyond Facebook's financial support of the city of Menlo Park to other communities. Oracle could start to fund the Redwood City Police Department, or Google could do the same in Mountain View, he posited.

A protester holds a sign that reads "Stop Police Brutality" outside the Menlo Park Police Department on Sept. 25. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

Artist Edi Hsu, who has been documenting Black Lives Matter protests around the Bay Area through live-action watercolors, participated in the protest while drawing and painting with a small journal and watercolor kit.

Elijah Ezeji-Okoye made the trip from Watsonville to participate in the protest. He said that he was disappointed in the outcome of the Breonna Taylor grand jury verdict and the limited responses by police departments to the demands of the Black Lives Matter protests. He said he'd favor defunding police departments and investing in community response efforts, as well as listening to people in marginalized and lower-income communities to hear about their needs.

Around 8 p.m., as participants disbanded from the plaza in front of Kepler's and Cafe Borrone in the darkening evening, Faraji told attendees to plan to return at a later date.

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Kate Bradshaw writes for The Almanac, a sister publication of PaloAltoOnline.com.

Follow Palo Alto Online and the Palo Alto Weekly on Twitter @paloaltoweekly, Facebook and on Instagram @paloaltoonline for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Protesters demanding justice for Breonna Taylor stop traffic in Menlo Park

Bay Area residents speak out days after grand jury decision in Louisville killing

by / Almanac

Uploaded: Sat, Sep 26, 2020, 8:36 am

More than 150 people from around the Bay Area gathered Friday evening in Menlo Park in a protest that called for justice in the police killing of Breonna Taylor and pushed for reform in the Menlo Park Police Department.

Taylor, a 26-year-old Black medical worker, was killed in her apartment by police in Louisville, Kentucky while they executed a search warrant in March. On Wednesday, Sept. 23, a grand jury's decision was announced: Of three officers who fired shots, only one, who had been dismissed from the force, was indicted for "wanton endangerment," or recklessly firing his gun. None were charged for causing Taylor's death, according to the New York Times.

In response, protests have flared up around the U.S.

In Menlo Park, Friday's protest organized to demand justice for Breonna Taylor, according to event flyers, was organized by East Palo Alto-based art and activism collective Tha Hood Squad and Mountain View and Los Altos-based anti-racism organization Justice Vanguard.

The rally began around 6 p.m., when attendees gathered in the plaza in front of Kepler's Books and Cafe Borrone before marching to the Menlo Park Civic Center, where they stood and chanted at various locations around the Police Department headquarters before returning to the plaza.

During their march, they stopped twice in the middle of the intersection of El Camino Real and Ravenswood and Menlo avenues for an extended period of time. Vehicles formed a line along El Camino Real, and some honked in annoyance.

Seth Donnelly, who teaches at Los Altos High School and has been involved with the Justice Vanguard and Tha Hood Squad, said that their protest was held in Menlo Park in an effort to establish a "culture of resistance" throughout the Peninsula, and to call specific attention to the Menlo Park Police Department and its policing practices with Black and Latinx people.

While the group's action to stop traffic at a critical intersection was somewhat spontaneous, he added, "Society itself needs to understand that it's not business as usual as long as business as usual is the murder of Black people and business as usual is the perpetuation of white supremacy. … We need to understand that society itself needs to be interrupted in its normal function."

Protesters carried signs bearing statements such as "Silence is violence," "No more Black death" and "No Justice No Peace" and shouted chants like "Same story every time / Being Black is not a crime."

"It's a shame that this is happening over and over again," said protest organizer JT Faraji, a longtime critic of Menlo Park police and founder of Tha Hood Squad. "We have to do something about it."

He spoke about policing practices in Menlo Park, including the city's acceptance of funds from Facebook to pay for police services.

"It's only a matter of time before we have our own Breonna Taylor. It's only a matter of time before we have our own George Floyd," he said. "We can no longer assume, hope and pray the system will fix itself."

At the midpoint of the protests, attendees gathered at the rear of the Menlo Park police station and shouted "Quit your job," and "No good cops in a racist system."

A number of protesters this news organization spoke with said they came from communities outside Menlo Park to participate.

Desiree Sakal, a Hayward resident, said she was not surprised by the grand jury verdict in the Breonna Taylor case. Accompanying her was Chelsey Monroe from San Francisco, who added that she was there because, as a Black woman, she felt so much grief at the decision and felt the only way to release that sadness was to participate with others in the protest.

Sequoia High School student and Redwood City resident Ray Evans said he was concerned about the idea that corporate-funded police departments could expand beyond Facebook's financial support of the city of Menlo Park to other communities. Oracle could start to fund the Redwood City Police Department, or Google could do the same in Mountain View, he posited.

Artist Edi Hsu, who has been documenting Black Lives Matter protests around the Bay Area through live-action watercolors, participated in the protest while drawing and painting with a small journal and watercolor kit.

Elijah Ezeji-Okoye made the trip from Watsonville to participate in the protest. He said that he was disappointed in the outcome of the Breonna Taylor grand jury verdict and the limited responses by police departments to the demands of the Black Lives Matter protests. He said he'd favor defunding police departments and investing in community response efforts, as well as listening to people in marginalized and lower-income communities to hear about their needs.

Around 8 p.m., as participants disbanded from the plaza in front of Kepler's and Cafe Borrone in the darkening evening, Faraji told attendees to plan to return at a later date.

Kate Bradshaw writes for The Almanac, a sister publication of PaloAltoOnline.com.

Comments

Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Sep 26, 2020 at 9:16 am
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2020 at 9:16 am
89 people like this

Protestors who block traffic should be arrested.


Whatever
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Sep 26, 2020 at 9:26 am
Whatever, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2020 at 9:26 am
81 people like this

Until Back culture looks in the mirror nothing will ever change because change for the good always starts with looking in the mirror and getting over the VICTIM ROLE.

[Portion removed.]




Granny B
Registered user
Midtown
on Sep 26, 2020 at 9:31 am
Granny B, Midtown
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2020 at 9:31 am
16 people like this

As for people coming to the protest from out of town, I don't see what that matters. There are not protests in every town, so people who want to demonstrate will either go to a town nearby, or one where they have friends or relatives and so they are familiar with the area. Thank you for covering this important act of civil disobedience. The Breonna Taylor case is a travesty.


Vote!
Registered user
Evergreen Park
on Sep 26, 2020 at 11:07 am
Vote!, Evergreen Park
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2020 at 11:07 am
25 people like this

@Jennifer - the right to protest is protected by the US Constitution. How do you want people to protest police brutality? By doing it quietly in their own living room so that goodness forbid they do not inconvenience you?

@Whatever - your statements are racist, hateful and uneducated. Please read up on systemic racism and the related topics before making statements such as this. And yeah, you are the reason why people are out on the streets protesting.

Breonna Taylor's case is an outrage, it really is. We need large systemic changes; and until enough people are outraged by this they won't happen.

And on another note, reading the comments on the admittedly very sad and disturbing news articles of late here - it looks like there are a lot more voices that weren't heard here, in Palo Alto, too often before. Lots of negativity, lots of racism, lots of hate. All of this happening in the last couple of months. I am wondering why that is. Are people in that group more emboldened by the political climate - both the great divide and the behaviors that were previously looked down upon but became normalized by the political right? Or are these people concerned that this hate fest is coming to the end and just want to get the last licks in? Makes one wonder.


Online Name
Registered user
Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Sep 26, 2020 at 11:26 am
Online Name, Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2020 at 11:26 am
39 people like this

Taylor's death was shameful, as are the many other acts of unjustified acts of police violence and overreach.

I support peaceful protests and marches but blocking traffic and chants like "Whose streets? OUR streets!" is turning off supporters and creating a serious backlash, as is the unfortunate slogan "Defund The Police" when "Reform the Police" would have been more accurate and less divisive.


Hmmm
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on Sep 26, 2020 at 11:29 am
Hmmm, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2020 at 11:29 am
28 people like this

Blocking streets has worn itself out as a tactic. Otherwise, it’s great to see protestors in Menlo Park, even though I wouldn’t trust Faraji as far as I could throw him. He didn’t put his money or time where his mouth was when it came to his concerns about how people in RVs were being treated a couple years ago. It’s unsurprising that he feels entitled to block major intersections.


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Sep 26, 2020 at 12:36 pm
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2020 at 12:36 pm
75 people like this

Protesting is legal, but blocking traffic isn't. It's a good way to get run over, and if it happens, you have nobody to blame but yourself.


Nayeli
Registered user
Midtown
on Sep 26, 2020 at 2:28 pm
Nayeli, Midtown
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2020 at 2:28 pm
49 people like this

[Post removed; inaccurate factual assertions.]


DB55
Registered user
Leland Manor/Garland Drive
on Sep 26, 2020 at 3:29 pm
DB55, Leland Manor/Garland Drive
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2020 at 3:29 pm
11 people like this

Re: blocking traffic - there is a long history here. Dr. King’s march for voting rights in Selma in 1965 blocked the entire width of the Edmund Pettis Bridge. Closer to home, I participated in demonstrations against the Vietnam War that occasionally blocked traffic on El Camino in Palo Alto. At a time when too many police are getting away with murdering black people, including Breonna Taylor in her bed, perhaps a small disruption of people’s routines isn’t out of order? There was no violence or looting, which is wrong and counter-productive
always, in Menlo Park Friday night, but the status quo of inaction against systemic racism just cannot stand.


Justice
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Sep 26, 2020 at 4:33 pm
Justice , Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2020 at 4:33 pm
5 people like this

No Nayeli it’s not true


Me 2
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Sep 26, 2020 at 5:32 pm
Me 2, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2020 at 5:32 pm
3 people like this

"I am wondering why that is. Are people in that group more emboldened by the political climate - both the great divide and the behaviors that were previously looked down upon but became normalized by the political right? Or are these people concerned that this hate fest is coming to the end and just want to get the last licks in? Makes one wonder"

I wonder if all those people who are wondering need to diversify what they read on the web.


Nayeli
Registered user
Midtown
on Sep 26, 2020 at 5:39 pm
Nayeli, Midtown
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2020 at 5:39 pm
43 people like this

[Post removed; inaccurate factual assertions.]


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Sep 26, 2020 at 6:22 pm
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Sep 26, 2020 at 6:22 pm
37 people like this

Her ex-boyfriend (Jamarcus Glover) is a convicted felon. He's the reason police were at her door. She was suspected of receiving packages on behalf of Glover, who police suspected of drug trafficking, according to court records.

Her boyfriend (Kenneth Walker) shot police when police entered her apartment. Walker thought they were victims of a home invasion. Attempted murder charges were dropped.


AlexDeLarge
Registered user
Midtown
on Sep 27, 2020 at 11:28 am
AlexDeLarge, Midtown
Registered user
on Sep 27, 2020 at 11:28 am
12 people like this

[Post removed.]


Granny B
Registered user
Midtown
on Sep 27, 2020 at 11:37 am
Granny B, Midtown
Registered user
on Sep 27, 2020 at 11:37 am
7 people like this

[Portion removed.] I am finding it hard to understand how people I probably have passed by on the streets of Palo Alto have these attitudes. Her ex-boyfriend is the monster and not the police who actually killed her? How does that make sense?


Sick of racism
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Sep 27, 2020 at 11:41 am
Sick of racism, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on Sep 27, 2020 at 11:41 am
10 people like this

I completly support this peaceful protest and thank those who took the time organize it so thoughtfully, forcused on Menlo Park where you wanted to make an impact.

And thank you to those who came here from other towns. That's how protests work - people gather from all around. Last summers BLM rally and march that took place on Palo Alto's city hall plaza where local Mayors, Congresswoman Eshoo, and Judge Cordell spoke brought people from many towns.

I encourage all demonstrators stop blocking traffic for a very simple reason. As you see here, the conversation gets siderailed into people complaining and questioning the credibitly of a protest that does this. It takes the focus off the subject of the protest, just like breaking windows does. Why do that when the focus should be all on the cruel unjust murder of Taylor and a racist police and justice system? The rest is just a distraction. It also allienates people that could be allies - not something one ever wants to do.

There is no rational justification but recklessness and racism for the murder of Breonna Taylor. To make excuses otherwise, or that other people were imperfec or whatever, is more of the same mentality that got her murdered.

Here is a great 0p-ed by former Stanford Student Body President David Harris about this in todays L.A. Times.
Web Link=


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Sep 27, 2020 at 11:48 am
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Sep 27, 2020 at 11:48 am
55 people like this

How is her ex-boyfriend responsible? I think her ex-boyfriend (who was selling drugs) her boyfriend (who shot the police, and the police fired back, and herself [portion removed] are all responsible. If someone fired a gun at you, would you fire back, especially if you're a cop? ABSOLUTELY!

What do you expect the police to do? Let the boyfriend fire away and kill everyone? Get real.

She wasn't "murdered" by police. Murder involves pre-meditation. She was shot and killed during a warrant. And whose fault is it that police showed up at her door?


MVresident2003
Mountain View

Registered user
on Sep 27, 2020 at 12:05 pm
Name hidden, Mountain View

Registered user
on Sep 27, 2020 at 12:05 pm

Due to violations of our Terms of Use, comments from this poster are only visible to registered users who are logged in. Use the links at the top of the page to Register or Login.


AlexDeLarge
Registered user
Midtown
on Sep 27, 2020 at 1:00 pm
AlexDeLarge, Midtown
Registered user
on Sep 27, 2020 at 1:00 pm
11 people like this

[Post removed.]


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Sep 28, 2020 at 8:14 am
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Sep 28, 2020 at 8:14 am
39 people like this

[Portion removed.]

Why Menlo Park? I don't get that. When protestors are roaming around creating havoc they are using up what ever funds a city has that have been dedicated to actual city activity. A city has a budget to manage the on-going activity of a city that it is required to provide. So now the protestors are siphoning budget dollars to deal with whatever comes up in these protests. What is worse they are paid to do that. It costs money to move protestors around and provide their signs and equipment.

I think it is time to sue the organizations that fund these activities and charge them for the cost of the police force and the cost of the interruption of business for the people who have stores on those streets. You know that those businesses have to close during these activities.

That is why there is a permit process for street activities. You put on an activity you pay for the support services used for that activity. Time to get real here.


Anonymous
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 28, 2020 at 9:45 am
Anonymous, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Sep 28, 2020 at 9:45 am
9 people like this

It’s sad to hear of situations where Black people were killed or injured. It sounds like a lot. I am open to learning ever more about this.

It will help to learn hard stats on number of police stops, number of those discovered to have an outstanding warrant (should they be permitted to just go on their way!?) How should this be handled, to protect the general public out there and the laws, rules, norms of our society?

On the other hand, how can police be required to wear operating cameras w/video and audio and also try MUCH harder to avoid innocent or non-accessory individuals from getting caught up in the situation or the crossfire when their associates, friends, boyfriends are justified to be questioned and/or arrested?

Should we change the Law so those on outstanding warrants don’t need to be arrested and brought in? I thought- correct me here - outstanding warrants are when a judge has issued that for a serious chargeable offense - and the person is EVADING the warrant.

Even so, the reality is that sentiment of absolutely needing to do better ASAP, which is concerned and heart-felt is different from each and every *individual case,* which are facts of what happened. We must know the facts, not the opinions of people who weren’t at a particular event.
Why? Because justice depends on facts not generalized feelings of anger or even beliefs of injustice. In some cases the conclusion will be it IS an error or on pupose, which then must be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the Law.

- and in other cases the facts may show the sad result was justified, though not pleasant of course. Someone may be dead.

Police unions appear to have gotten politicians (not the general public, so don’t hate on me) to institute favorable guidelines that are lax on police conduct, reviews, repercussions after confusing and controversial events.

Police have to make split-second decisions and policies and procedures and practices must be as clear as possible. They do have a right to defend themselves, many situations when realizing they’re dealing with someone who is evading an outstanding warrant are obviously dangerous and uncomfortable, esp when he resists arrest.

Gratuitous killing of George Floyd was clearly excessive force and police bystander behavior despicable. That’s ONE case, which is pretty well documented. Comparing that to others is actually not possible to do. Each case is different.

Blocking streets doesn’t accomplish anything but disrupt society. Protests at government sites, demands for clarity on reports and justice all make sense. Screaming at random people leaves ME cold.


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Sep 28, 2020 at 12:37 pm
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Sep 28, 2020 at 12:37 pm
35 people like this

It's sad when anyone is killed or injured. Not everything is a racial issue. She was shot and killed because there was a shootout in her apartment. Her boyfriend shot at police, and the police defended themselves. What does that have to do with race? And why was $12 million awarded to her family? People are shot and killed in police shootouts all the time, but it's only a racial issue if they're black? To me, that doesn't make any sense. Instead of "no more black deaths" wouldn't no more deaths be better? No knock warrants are a dangerous situation regardless of race.


Stepheny
Registered user
Midtown
on Sep 28, 2020 at 12:46 pm
Stepheny , Midtown
Registered user
on Sep 28, 2020 at 12:46 pm
36 people like this

The constant marching is wearing thin. I am feeling a "blacklash" now against the BLM movement where I was once sympathetic. If these protestors want to change something, bring attention to their mission, they should build something, do something constructive. Portland and Seattle are not good examples to bring here.


AnonymousPerson
Registered user
another community
on Sep 28, 2020 at 10:25 pm
AnonymousPerson, another community
Registered user
on Sep 28, 2020 at 10:25 pm
20 people like this

I am all for protesting, but not when it comes to blocking off major streets and stopping traffic.

I had medical problems several months ago. I at one point was taken to the ER via ambulance, and another time drove myself to the ER. If these people were blocking traffic and stopped me from getting to the ER, I don't even know what would have happened. I also suffer from panic attacks, and can tell you that being stuck in this situation as a driver could have triggered a severe panic attack. That aside, there are people on the way to pick up their children, tend to sick family members, and to get to other extremely important matters, where time is of the essence. These protestors, many of whom are very young, have no idea that potential damage that they are causing to innocent people. This is beyond just an inconvenience to some people, and could be a matter of life and death.

I am just wondering how these protestors would react if someone in their own family was on the way to the hospital (in labor) to have a baby, or if one of their parents was on the way to the ER due to a suspected heart attack, or if a close family member was being taken to the hospital via ambulance...and this protest was what delayed their own family members in getting medical attention.

I understand that protestors want/need to get attention, but in my opinion, blocking traffic just isn't the way to do it.


Anonymous
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 29, 2020 at 10:55 am
Anonymous, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Sep 29, 2020 at 10:55 am
20 people like this

It’s simple: they DON’T CARE about you - if they are delaying or blocking you (never mind that screaming irratinally and smashing at cars which are blocked and confused on a freeway or road won’t make ANY change on the issue they are protesting about, whatever the merits of lack thereof of that issue).
It’s just cool and GREAT for social media.

To be clear: advocating to officials at all governmental levels and to the public is fine. Of course.
Protesting at city hall and other government offices is fine. Using the news media and social media is fine. Education is fine. Keep it non-violent, coherent, and don’t damage others’ bodies or property or public property. I realize for my just writing this, some would like to scream and threaten at me and stick a fist in my face. That represents a certain segment of the public. Scary and NOT ok.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Sep 29, 2020 at 12:47 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Sep 29, 2020 at 12:47 pm
14 people like this

What I don't get here - if you go into a city and create mayhem and break stuff you are shutting down the businesses in those cities. If EVERYONE needs a job then how do the protestors go forward with a real job? Do you put on your resume that you are an official protestor and you have no skill set to offer than that "specialty"?

If everyone wants to be treated equally then getting a real job is part of that equality. And you have to go to school and develop a marketable skill to get a job.

I don't see where a protestor goes after this experience - they are digging a hole instead of going to school and kicking butt in getting good grades. This is a backward method for them - they are doing nothing to advance their lives. Just being a "protestor" is not a resume builder.


Granny B
Registered user
Midtown
on Sep 29, 2020 at 1:51 pm
Granny B, Midtown
Registered user
on Sep 29, 2020 at 1:51 pm
2 people like this

There is an excellent explanation of why demonstrators blocked traffic in Menlo Park last Friday night in this article.

Web Link


AnonymousPerson
Registered user
another community
on Sep 29, 2020 at 2:20 pm
AnonymousPerson, another community
Registered user
on Sep 29, 2020 at 2:20 pm
11 people like this

@Granny B

I read that article and disagree that it is an excellent explanation of why protestors blocked the street. Most of these protestors are kids, with nothing better to do. And they don't understand the consequences of their actions because they don't have enough life experience.

Like I said before, this is all "good" to them because they don't care about someone stuff in traffic who is on the way to the hospital. Because that life isn't important. Only their message is important.


Granny B
Registered user
Midtown
on Sep 29, 2020 at 2:37 pm
Granny B, Midtown
Registered user
on Sep 29, 2020 at 2:37 pm
2 people like this

Really, Anonymous? You KNOW that it is mostly kids there? Where you there and observed this? No?
Because I WAS there. There were a lot of young people but not "kids with nothing else to do." I would say it was mostly twenty and thirty somethings, but also Grannies like me. That's right, people old enough to have protested in the Civil Rights Movement and some who DID. There was at least one teacher there I spoke with. There were tech industry employees. There were people of all races and all ages.


AnonymousPerson
Registered user
another community
on Sep 29, 2020 at 3:05 pm
AnonymousPerson, another community
Registered user
on Sep 29, 2020 at 3:05 pm
12 people like this

@Granny B

The article that you shared shows photos of mostly very young people. I'm sure there were older people there, but out of all of the photos I have seen of these types of protests, where people are blocking the streets, the vast majority of people in the photos appear to be high school students, college students, and people younger than their mid-20's.

I also noticed in some of the photos that I have seen that it looks like some of the older people are not actually blocking the streets, but rather off to the side. And it is in fact primarily kids and young people that are actually selfish and reckless enough to block traffic.

I know a lot of people in my inner circle and my larger network and out of all of those people, I don't know anyone that has blocked traffic during a protest. Not one person. Most people in their 30's have young kids and real life obligations so aren't as able to participate in these types of events anyway.

But yes, the reality is that many of the protests that get out of hand with people blocking highways and streets and/or getting violent are filled with young people who just don't have a lot of responsibilities, have a lot of time, and don't have a lot of care for others who may be hurt in the process. Especially during the pandemic when schools are closed, and this is a great chance for kids to get together and rebel by blocking traffic.

Again, I am all for protesting. But not when it is dangerous or violent or harmful to other people. I believe that yes, of course, black lives matter. But I am empathetic to other lives as well.


AnonymousPerson
Registered user
another community
on Sep 29, 2020 at 3:14 pm
AnonymousPerson, another community
Registered user
on Sep 29, 2020 at 3:14 pm
10 people like this

@Granny B

I think all of this has actually made me less sympathetic toward the BLM movement. I am realizing more and more that they don't care about me, but I have to care about them. As someone that has (and is still) dealing with health issues, I have to know that I can get to the ER if I need to. This area luckily isn't as impacted by covid right now, but if it was, there would be a lot of other people also rushing to get to the hospital like there were in NYC and other places. For me to have to sit here and be told that I need to not only accept but to embrace people blocking off streets is absolutely ridiculous. It is traumatizing. Especially given the violence that has occurred when other streets were blocked off.


Granny B
Registered user
Midtown
on Sep 29, 2020 at 4:25 pm
Granny B, Midtown
Registered user
on Sep 29, 2020 at 4:25 pm
2 people like this

I see, someone who saw a few blurry photos presumes to know better than someone who actually attended the Menlo Park protest. I'm sorry you feel, Anonymous, that people don't care about your needs when they demonstrate in the streets. I post here part of the indybay article on why people took over the intersection in Menlo Park. Maybe it will help you and others think about the needs of an entire race of citizens.

"It seems many people hold in mind the myth that the the civil rights movement wasn’t disruptive. The Montgomery Bus Boycott was a disruptive consumer boycott. Its goal was to use the power of black consumers to hurt the bus company and make the city address Black demands. In addition, the Birmingham, Alabama campaign of 1963 included mass civil disobedience designed to shut down businesses, overflow local jails, and halt the city's ability to function.

Mass civil disobedience was key to the work of many civil rights groups. Organizations including the Congress of Racial Equality and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee understood that justice could not be won without disrupting civic and commercial life.

It was in the spirit of the Civil Rights Movement that demonstrators took the streets in Menlo Park in reaction to the lack of an indictment for murder in the Breonna Taylor case. They also called on the Menlo Park Police Department to put an immediate halt its to racist practices."


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Sep 30, 2020 at 10:23 am
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Sep 30, 2020 at 10:23 am
12 people like this

WOW - Granny B is relieving her youth. There is a time for everything, and everything in it's time. Yes - the 1960's were a great time for marches. I grew up in LA and Tom Bradley (1917 - 1998) was chief of police and the Mayor - 1973 - 1993. He was a track star in college. The LAX International Terminal is named after him. He ran for Governor.

Go up to SF - Willie Brown was Mayor of SF, went on to the state assembly and was Speaker of the House. He is a contributing columnist to the SFC.

So people and time progressed and people who applied themselves to some useful endeavor progressed. In my professional life the military and corporations that support the defense activities for this country have a healthy spread of upper level managers, scientist, and engineers who learned their skills by earning solid degrees that advanced their careers and the knowledge base of their educational focus. That is the picture that I go with knowing that all people can enjoy their life if they avail themselves of the educational advantages that are right in front of their faces.

Sorry - but the official BLM movement has a strategy that is Marxist - that is on their FB page - and they are proud of it. I think their agenda does nothing for the US and they are using a 1960's strategy and namesakes to advance their agenda.
If you are going back to the 1960's you are going backwards. We all learned a lot in the 70's and need to go forward with what we know works and benefits all people.

So why aren't you talking about Willie Brown? Tom Bradley? Condoleezza Rice? All of the people working in DC now who are there because of their individual achievements?

The bottom line is that everyone needs to work within the system as contributors - not destroyers. As John F. Kennedy said - "Ask what you can do for your country - not what your country can do for you".


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Sep 30, 2020 at 11:56 am
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Sep 30, 2020 at 11:56 am
9 people like this

My opinion - the Marxist Communist Manifest promotes people based on ideological allegiance VS actual skills in a specified endeavor. It is promoting ideas based on a "retribution" factor. You follow directions or you will be trashed.

The Capitalist approach advances people of ALL color who demonstrate skill in an endeavor that contributes to the general welfare of the community. That is ALL PEOPLE. It is a rewards based approach vs a retribution approach.

We are seeing the retribution approach is major cities - Portland, Chicago, etc. People who subscribe to blocking major streets, bridges, access to federal buildings are in the retribution camp.

Put that on your resume in 5 years when you need a real job and have a family to support.


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