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A cultural tug-of-war: who do I cheer for in the Olympics?

Uploaded: Feb 16, 2022
I love the Olympics. There’s something truly special about it, watching the most talented athletes from a diverse set of countries come together to participate in some old-school friendly competition. It’s a culmination of four years of relentless training: intense, heartbreaking, and exhilarating—both a pinnacle of entertainment and a show of international unity and solidarity.

When you see a runner give up on a potential podium place to help an injured opponent or two athletes from different countries conversing and joking around before their event, it's easy to believe that all is right in the world, that everybody gets along and we are separated only by distance and not disposition. I’m sure that most Olympics-watchers have top contenders that they root for, but rarely do we have people we don’t want to win—at the end of the day, the rivalries are pleasantly resolved. Usually, the most deserving athlete gets the prize. My family and I love watching the figure skating events, and we always have favorites that we cheer for; we’re particularly fond of America’s favorite Nathan Chen and Palo Alto’s very own Vincent Zhou (who unfortunately had to miss out this Olympics because of COVID); I'm also a recent fan of new Olympic figure skater Alysa Liu.

When it comes to the events I’m less familiar with, however, I have trouble choosing favorites. Instead, I often cheer for athletes based simply on one of two factors: their personality (maybe from a small grin they shot at the camera before their race) or the country they represent.

I root for the American athletes, of course, but I’ve always felt conflicted on whether or not it was okay for me to cheer for the Chinese competitors as well. My parents are Chinese, I am Chinese, and many of my friends are, too. Much like the other Asian Americans here, I’ve grown up learning American ideals and Chinese culture in tandem. Naturally, I feel a sort of allyship with the Chinese athletes—I see myself in them. Just like them, I know that red means luck, I enjoy home-cooked Chinese food almost every night, and I speak Mandarin at home (albeit with a little bit of English slipped in).

But when it comes to the Olympics, in part because of the rising tensions between the two countries and the ways that many Americans perceive China, I’ve felt a bit awkward rooting for these Chinese athletes. It might seem silly, but it’s hard not to link the negative sentiments about China that dominate my news feeds to the athletes that are representing the country. If I cheer for a Chinese skier, does that mean I support the entire country and its government’s deeds? Is it okay for me to feel a surge of pride when a Chinese athlete makes it to the podium? I have no trouble celebrating when an American makes it onto the stage, but when it comes to their Chinese counterparts, I sometimes get the feeling that I should be ashamed.

Watching Chinese American freestyle skier Eileen Gu receive backlash from Americans for representing China, I realize that I can’t simply separate the Olympic games from these ever-present political divides. On the flip side of the coin, California-born Chinese figure skater Zhu Yi faces similarly heinous comments from Chinese citizens for representing China and falling on her Olympic debut skate. Because of the uncomfortable tension between the two countries, Olympic athletes often find themselves caught in the crossfire of foreign diplomatic warfare. And on a lower scale, I understand their pain. I face a difficult tug-of-war of emotion; on one side, there’s the country I’ve called home all my life, along with the troubling current events and human rights allegations. On the other side, there’s a deep pride for and kinship with my culture and family that I can't ignore; it's not a easy task to renounce the heritage that's central to who I am today.

I don’t have a right answer for this dilemma. I do hope, however, that we can find it within ourselves to be kinder and more forgiving to these young athletes; they are first and foremost athletes, beyond being teenagers who inadvertently and unintentionally became international talking points and objects of diplomatic debates. In the same vein, I hope we can also become more understanding of the alienation that recent or second generation immigrants face when having to decide between their old roots and their new ones. While this push-and-pull manifests louder during the Olympics, it's a struggle we face every day.
Community.
What is it worth to you?

Comments

Posted by Christine, a resident of Midtown,
on Feb 17, 2022 at 12:12 am

Christine is a registered user.

I totally get it! I'm also Chinese, and while it does feel awkward to root for an Olympian from China, I find myself being more proud of a Chinese athlete winning than an American one and choosing to root for the Chinese athletes hahah. I see myself in their faces and it's very touching to see them represent where our culture and history came from!


Posted by Daniel Wu, a resident of Los Altos,
on Feb 17, 2022 at 9:29 am

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I root for all of the competitors (regardless of their country) to perform well as these athletes have trained for years to be in the Olympics and this is their moment to shine.

On the other hand, I have a problem with Chinese-American athletes who renounce their American citizenship in order to compete for the PRC regardless of whether their parents immigrated from China and my feelings on this issue would apply to anyone else doing the same thing (i.e. a Russian-American athlete competing for the ROC etc.).

The International Olympic Committee is playing politics by allowing this option to take place along with its 'slap on the wrist' approach to handling the Russian figure skater who tested positive for doping.

If an American citizen is not proud enough to represent the United States and renounce their American citizenship to compete for another country, then they should reside permanently in the country they have chosen to compete for.

As a Cantonese-American whose family is fully assimilated and has been here since the late 19th century, it is difficult for me to comprehend those who reap the benefits of being an American citizen yet choose to represent another country.

It would be like former U.S. Olympic Gold Medalist figure skater Kristi Yamaguchi (a third generation Japanese American) opting to compete for Japan.

Perhaps my opinion is based on the economic, and political differences between Cantonese and Mandarin Chinese-Americans as Cantonese-Americans are proud of both their American citizenship and cultural backgrounds.

And unlike the wealthier and more recent PRC immigrants to America, the Cantonese-Americans arrived in this country as impoverished Asian immigrants who worked menial jobs and whose children in addition to seeking higher education, proudly served in the U.S military to affirm both their gratitude and ongoing allegiance to this country.

Times have changed.


Posted by Lonnie Wilford, a resident of Crescent Park,
on Feb 17, 2022 at 12:45 pm

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* "I have a problem with Chinese-American athletes who renounce their American citizenship in order to compete for the PRC regardless of whether their parents immigrated from China."

* "If an American citizen is not proud enough to represent the United States and renounce their American citizenship to compete for another country, then they should reside permanently in the country they have chosen to compete for."

* "...it is difficult for me to comprehend those who reap the benefits of being an American citizen yet choose to represent another country."

^ I have discussed this issue with several of my Cantonese-American colleagues at work and they concur as their multi-gemerational families are fully assimilated and have absolutely no ties, interest, nor personal allegiances to the mainland Communist regime and its current global activities/objectives.

The Cantonese-Americans (from southern China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan) prefer not to be lumped into the same category as the predominant Mandarin populace from the People's Republic of China (northern China) as both their language, cultures, and political perspectives differ immensely.





Posted by Adam Richter, a resident of another community,
on Feb 17, 2022 at 1:11 pm

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One of my former classmates at Stanford successfully competed for the United States in the Summer Olympics and his family was originally from Cuba.

And there is absolutely no way he would have ever represented the Communist Castro regime.

His name: Pablo Morales (who is both an attorney and the current women's swim coach at the University of Nebraska).

It is OK to embrace one's ethnic culture but it is equally important to draw the line when it comes to who and what you stand for.


Posted by Lane Murakami, a resident of another community,
on Feb 17, 2022 at 3:49 pm

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I echo the earlier comments from the standpoint that while my great-grandparents immigrated to the United States from Japan, I would never consider competing for Japan (even if I had the athletic talent) because first & foremost, I am an American citizen as are my parents & grandparents.

My grandfather enlisted in the U.S Army & served in the all-Nissei 442 Regimental Combat Unit during World War Two while my grandparents and their families were sequestered in internment camps by the American government.

And despite this grave injustice, he did not consider any allegiance to Japan just because he was of Japanese descent. My grandfather considered himself an American citizen first as Japan at the time was a wartime enemy of the United States.

The Kristi Yamaguchi and Pablo Morales references are good examples of showing one's true colors.


Posted by John B. Sails, a resident of Midtown,
on Feb 18, 2022 at 9:18 am

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I cheer for America, of course, but also for the other countries where I've been more than once cause I liked them so much the first time. China is at the top of that list. Unfortunately, I feel there is now this media-internet-spawned cold war building, so we are supposed to think of the worst political decisions that the ruling communist party of China has ever made and paint everyone Chinese with that brush. I dissent to that.

There is this other popular conflation I have noticed with confusing military allegiance with joining a team for a fun sporting contest. In short, I disagree that Eileen Gu is John Walker Lindh. Not the same thing at all.

Finally, please consider this. Think of the Trump years into the Covid Lockdown years, and all the internet hate. How many times have you read posts along the lines of "China has invected the world!" ? and then you turn on the TV, and you see Chinese grandmothers getting attacked by strangers from behind or grandfathers being thrown in front of moving cars? This has to stop.

All this to say, I completely support the choices of the California-Chinese who decided this special time to proudly perform for the other most powerful nation in the world. I believe they are motivated by love and peace, not hate or war.


Posted by Bob Emory, a resident of another community,
on Feb 18, 2022 at 11:08 am

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"I completely support the choices of the California-Chinese who decided this special time to proudly perform for the other most powerful nation in the world."

"I believe they are motivated by love and peace, not hate or war."

^ This is a very idealistic and naive perspective on your part.

It is all about money and not about spreading love and peace...the hippies learned that lesson a long time ago and many de-evolved into yuppies.

American-born athletes who have renounced their affiliations and willingness to be a part of the U.S. Olympic Team such as Eileen Gu are motivated by post-Olympic advertising dollars and endorsements.

The consumer market in the PRC is huge and Ms. Gu already has $42M in advertising contracts to promote Chinese products and services within the mainland.

She is also a model for Victoria's Secret and Louis Vuitton to name a few...so she apparently has other high-ticket advertising bases covered as well.

This is a saavy and enterprising marketing effort spawned by her mother
who is both a Chinese national with an engineering degree from the prestigious Peking University along with post-graduate studies at Auburn University and an MBA from Stanford University. She later became an executive at Lehman Brothers.

Eileen Gu's father (whom the media seems to know nothing about) is a white American who is reputed to have studied at both Harvard and in China.

Eileen Gu was raised by a single parent/mother and grew up in an exclusive San Francisco neighborhood.

She was also groomed for this lucrative media exposure role having accompanied her mother on the slopes where she learned to ski beginning at age three.

While it obviously took skill and devotion to perfect her craft, there was a bigger picture in mind...a highly commercialized one instilled by a success-driven mother.

What remains to be seen is whether this advertising ploy will prove effective in the PRC where most of its inhabitants were not born with a silver spoon.



Posted by TripleLMember, a resident of Triple El,
on Feb 21, 2022 at 7:30 pm

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My problem with Chinese Americans' representing China is that, in effect, they consent to the way China use them to politicize the Olympics. The Chinese government and many Chinese are very nationalistic. They see Olympic medalists as a manifestation of China's rising power. The athletes are very naive if they think they won't be used as part of the Chinese government propaganda.


Posted by Lee Forrest, a resident of Southgate,
on Feb 22, 2022 at 11:47 am

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The real issue here involves "selling out" for commercial rewards or showing one's true allegiance to another country.


Posted by Yukio Morita, a resident of another community,
on Feb 23, 2022 at 12:03 pm

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Eileen Gu is a terrific athlete but little more than a marketing opportunist spearheaded by her 'tiger mother' who obviously has no allegiance to the United States.

Shameful in many respects.


Posted by Darin Chang, a resident of Stanford,
on Feb 23, 2022 at 12:49 pm

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In terms of total medal count, the PRC finished well below five other countries including the United States.

Gu's two gold medals were a gift horse to the PRC and the bottom line is that the United States Winter Olympic team did not need her as a team member or as an participating American athlete to enhance their overall medal count.

Gu's true colors are red along with the highly lucrative dollar sign as she was also careful not to criticize the PRC and it's questionable human rights violations.

Her quote, " When I am in China I am Chinese and when I am in America, I am an American" is two-faced opportunism.

And as a previous poster noted, venerable Cantonese-Americans do not operate by the same duplicity for we are Americans first and of Chinese descent.


Posted by Mary Beckham, a resident of Crescent Park,
on Feb 23, 2022 at 1:03 pm

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It should also be noted that during the Jordan Middle School renaming, it was the Mandarin parents who vehemently protested the name change to Fred Yamamoto (a native-born son of Palo Alto Japanese-American parents who was killed as an enlisted U.S. serviceman during WW2).

The Cantonese-Americans residing in Palo Alto had absolutely no issue or any reservations with this proposed name change.

This speaks volumes and serves as another reminder that many Cantonese-Americans do not want to be lumped into the same category as the recently arrived and wealthy Mandarins from the PRC.


Posted by Charles Leung, a resident of another community,
on Feb 24, 2022 at 9:27 am

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Mao's Cultural Revolution had a lot to do with why the recent immigrants from the PRC have no real sense of Chinese culture as compared to the many impoverished Cantonese immigrants who arrived in America centuries ago and have fully assimilated not only to American culture but also in terms of devotion and loyalty to the United States while maintaining their cultural backgrounds.

And the same can be said of multi-generational Japanese-Americans who have also fully assimilated and proven their loyalty to this country.

Mao effectively eliminated many traditional Chinese cultural practices by branding them as passe and effectively re-educating the masses towards an overall contempt for the western world and its sphere of dominant economic and cultural influences.

Today the PRC is still a Communist country that despises America but it now maintains an enormous manufacturing sphere of influence which in turn has created a new wealth class of Mandarins who now operate countless mainland manufacturing facilities.

The recent immigrants to America from the PRC are more along the lines of wealthy venture capitalists and the only indication of any western assimilation or loyalty is to expensive designer brands.


Posted by Erin Phillips, a resident of another community,
on Feb 24, 2022 at 10:00 am

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Olympic team representation aside, what I don't understand is why so many technically skilled and highly-educated Mandarin and East Indian professionals choose to stay in the United States rather than returning to their respective countries to help their own people in the areas of medical care and the promotion of economic equality.

This also speaks volumes.


Posted by Aron Stein, a resident of Stanford,
on Feb 24, 2022 at 11:32 am

Aron Stein is a registered user.

"I don't understand is why so many technically skilled and highly-educated Mandarin and East Indian professionals choose to stay in the United States rather than returning to their respective countries to help their own people in the areas of medical care and the promotion of economic equality."

^ India has a long-established caste system and the higher educated, well-to-do members of their society cannot be bothered with the impoverished and uneducated masses.

This is no different than America where upper middle class/professional whites and African Americans tend to disavow themselves from those they perceive as white trash or ghetto blacks.

The wealthy Chinese/Mandarins from the People's Republic of China who have immigrated to America are still in search of an identity as their native country also remains a nation of have and have nots.

As a result, they have chosen to embrace the opportunist and elitist material world
of their American counterparts while embracing the homeland and its geo-political dogma.


Posted by Candace Wong, a resident of Mountain View,
on Feb 24, 2022 at 11:56 am

Candace Wong is a registered user.

My great-great grandparents immigrated to the United States and resided in a Chinatown-San Francisco tenement where they ran a small laundry business.

They did not come to America as wealthy expatriates nor could they afford to purchase a nice multi-million dollar home in the Palo Alto suburbs.

My uncles also served in the U.S. Army during World War Two and completed their college educations via the G.I. Bill.

As others have emphasized, please do not compare or associate the Cantonese-Americans with the recent Mandarin immigrants from the People's Republic of China who apparently have no allegiance to the United States.


Posted by Jake Taylor, a resident of Leland Manor/Garland Drive,
on Feb 25, 2022 at 11:23 am

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To be a true American citizen involves embracing and accepting democratic ideals along with various aspects of American culture and not being a turncoat via allegiances to a dictatorship in another country that stifles free thought, speech, and continues to persecute dissidents and minority cultures.

The People's Republic of China and Russia are not friends of the United States nor will they ever be because they are trying to destroy America and its allies by any means possible.

And anyone who believes otherwise should return to their native countries rather than exploiting the good will of the American government and its lax immigration protocols.


Posted by Harvey Wong, a resident of another community,
on Feb 25, 2022 at 11:43 am

Harvey Wong is a registered user.

I am proud to be an American citizen of Chinese (Cantonese) descent.

Though we may look similar, please do not mistake us for the newly arrived Mandarin Chinese from the People's Republic of China.

Our native languages and culture are vastly different and we bear absolutely no allegiances to Communist China and its global objectives.




Posted by Beatrice Windham, a resident of Atherton,
on Feb 25, 2022 at 2:28 pm

Beatrice Windham is a registered user.

It is unfortunate that so many anti-Asian hate crimes are being perpetrated against innocent Asians, many of whom have no bearings or personal allegiances to the People's Republic of China.

My Chinese friends from Taiwan and Hong Kong sometimes feel they are being ostracized in America based on the geo-political-miltary-biological actions of a distant country in which they have come to despise.


Posted by Jim King, a resident of another community,
on Feb 27, 2022 at 9:31 am

Jim King is a registered user.

If someone offered you $42 million in advertising revenue to simply represent another country, why not?

Money is the essence of which all things are measured and most Olympians will never have an opportunity to cash-in on their efforts despite years of training and personal sacrifices.

On the other hand...except for some serious practice and inherent talent, Ms. Gu had it pretty easy given her affluent background and she will now be heading off for Stanford University to begin the next chapter of her life.


Posted by Bystander, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Feb 27, 2022 at 1:41 pm

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Among my friends and acquaintances are people with heritage from all over the world. Of course they cheer for their "home" countries. It doesn't make them anti-American, but they do feel a connection and that is to me natural.

As to some of the replies above, it is sad that this has become a thread about hate, crime, and similar. Sport is supposed to unite us in healthy competition. There are enough problems in the world at present and that is heartbreaking in itself.


Posted by Wei Jung, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Feb 27, 2022 at 2:46 pm

Wei Jung is a registered user.

"Sport is supposed to unite us in healthy competition."

In America, gambling on sports is a major pastime and teams often cheat in order to get an edge on the competition.

So why ostracize the Chinese and Russian teams when their indescretions are no more different than what Americans often do to win?

Sports is big money and money is king.


Posted by Robert Chung, a resident of another community,
on Feb 28, 2022 at 12:08 pm

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> "Gu's true colors are red along with the highly lucrative dollar sign as she was also careful not to criticize the PRC and it's questionable human rights violations."

° Eileen Gu and her mother's self-serving interests speak volumes in terms of financial opportunism while not rocking the PRC boat.

Eileen Gu made no mention of the persecution of Uighur Muslims in Xiang and simply said that she was "grateful that Peng Shui (the Chinese tennis star raped by a high-level Chinese government official) was happy and healthy and doing her thing again "

> "As others have emphasized, please do not compare or associate the Cantonese-Americans with the recent Mandarin immigrants from the People's Republic of China who apparently have no allegiance to the United States."

° Speaking as a descendent of humble and poor Cantonese immigrants, I can personally vouch for this sentiment.

> "I don't understand is why so many technically skilled and highly-educated Mandarin and East Indian professionals choose to stay in the United States rather than returning to their respective countries to help their own people in the areas of medical care and the promotion of economic equality."

° Having visited both India and China on business matters, I can understand this mindset as both countries leave something to be desired in terms of providing a quality living environment.

Those who have the money or professional education flock to America because permanently going back to their native countries offers very little in terms of quality of life or a promising future.


Posted by Emily Matsumura, a resident of another community,
on Feb 28, 2022 at 3:04 pm

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It should also be noted that the early immigrants from China (Cantonese) and Japan had initially planned to return to their native countries after saving money earned in the United States performing menial labor.

The Asian Exclusion Act and the internment of the Japanese during World War Two curtailed these objectives and many opted to remain in the United States due to elder age and because their children who were fully assimilated American citizens chose to look after them.

Having worked for a major Japanese company (NEC) during the 1980s, I also noticed that while most of the upper level management staff was from Japan, these executives eventually returned to Japan following a two-year tenure in the United States due to company policy + the Japanese employees actually preferred living in Japan rather than in the United States.

Overpopulation, rampant poverty, and repressive governments encourage many highly-educated immigrants to flee both China and India for a more promising life in America.

That said, if one elects to adopt America as one's newly chosen country, a sense of loyalty and gratitude towards this country should prevail.


Posted by Phil Beck, a resident of another community,
on Mar 1, 2022 at 8:23 am

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All things considered, the United States Winter Olympic Team did not need Eileen Gu as a team member because it always fields a highly competitive group of athletes capable of winning gold medals on their own.

China (PRC) is more noted for its strong summer Olympic teams and outside of ice skating, it leaves much to be desired in the more rigorous Alpine events.

Consequently, the two gold medals that Eileen Gu won for China wouldn't have made any difference in the total medal count as China finished far below the United States and other European countries whose teams always excel in winter sports competitions.

She has now become a highly marketable and visible role model for aspiring Chinese freestyle skiers, many of whom are gifted in gymnastics.

But unlike Eileen Gu who was trained on the finest ski slopes in America, the Chinese will have to rely on artificial snow as they did for the Beijing Olympics.

Good luck with that.


Posted by Yukio Kagawa, a resident of another community,
on Mar 1, 2022 at 11:15 am

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The 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics will go down as one of the worst one ever, rivaled only by the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin.

U.S. viewership was histrically low with only 11.4 million viewers.

Given its atrocious human rights violations, China should never have been allowed to host the Winter Olympics but no other country wanted to assume the duties due to the costs and ludicrous demands of the IOC (e.g. private roadways for Olympic officials).

As a result, the Beijing Olympics became a contrived PR opportunity for the PRC operating under the guise of a draconian police state.

Is this what Eileen Gu stands for?


Posted by Dallas Long, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 1, 2022 at 11:53 am

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Go easy on Ms. Gu as she is merely a highly talented adolescent puppet for her Tiger Mother whose apparent allegiances rest with the People's Republic of China.

Coming to America only strengthened those objectives as China remains a highly repressive and anti-democratic country along with Cuba, Russia, North Korea and Iran...all of whom are sworn enemies of America.


Posted by Claire Longley, a resident of another community,
on Mar 1, 2022 at 12:21 pm

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The 2022 Olympics are over and it is time to move on as the events have gotten far too political (as well as compromised) over the past decades.

And as far as any Chinese/Mandarin American athletes opting to compete for their native country, so be it as they have chosen their true colors.



Posted by Bystander, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 1, 2022 at 1:17 pm

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I always thought that mixing sport and politics is wrong.

However, I am delighted that Russia has been kicked out of FIFA world Cup, EUFA at both the club and national level. Other sports have done the same. Even the Eurovision Song Contest. Sometimes political messages have to be sent.


Posted by America First & Foremost, a resident of another community,
on Mar 2, 2022 at 8:59 am

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" The People's Republic of China and Russia are not friends of the United States nor will they ever be because they are trying to destroy America and its allies by any means possible."

"China remains a highly repressive and anti-democratic country along with Cuba, Russia, North Korea and Iran...all of whom are sworn enemies of America."

^ This is obvious but it should also be noted that the leaders of these despotic countries do not necessarily reflect the sentiments or best interests of their citizens which explains why so many of them want to immigrate to the United States which offers greater personal freedoms.

No one in their right mind would permantly and purposely want to immigrate to places like Russia, China, North Korea, Iran, or Cuba including many of the 3rd world countries in the SE Asian, African or Latin American continents except for personal or political reasons.

As for American citizens representing sworn enemies of the United States in the Olympics...no comment.



Posted by Jennifer Lockhart, a resident of Crescent Park,
on Mar 2, 2022 at 10:48 am

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America has become a nation of diversity with two key reference points:

Americans of the heart VS Americans by paper.


Posted by Dietrich Lange, a resident of another community,
on Mar 3, 2022 at 10:00 am

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? "who do I cheer for in the Olympics?"

^ I cheer for all of the competitors to do well, the exception being cheaters from Russia and American turncoats representing the PRC.


Posted by Carol Meadows, a resident of Los Altos,
on Mar 3, 2022 at 12:00 pm

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° "Americans of the heart VS Americans by paper."

^ The recently arrived immigrants from the People's Republic of China (along with their American born children) most likely fall into this category as the majority of them have rarely spoken up against the People's Republic of China and its blatant human rights violations and global aggression.

Why is that?

° "I cheer for all of the competitors to do well, the exception being cheaters from Russia and American turncoats representing the PRC."

^ I second this sentiment as China and Russia are our geo-political enemies.


Posted by Bystander, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 3, 2022 at 12:27 pm

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It is worth noting that Russia and Belarus have now been banned from the para Olympics one day after being told that they could compete but not under the flags of their respective countries. Since Russia were part of the winter Olympics even though they could not compete under their own flag but the ROC and Olympic flag.

It is a good move that they are not allowed to compete. The para Olympics start tomorrow.


Posted by Yoshi Suzuki, a resident of another community,
on Mar 4, 2022 at 7:28 am

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I suspect that many of the anti-Asian sentiments in America was predicated upon recent events emanating out of the People's Republic of China.

It is unfortunate that other Asian-American ethnicities also have to bear the brunt of these verbal and physical hostilities as they have absolutely no connection with the Mandarin/PRC populace in the United States or their pro-China leanings.


Posted by Benny Ignacio, a resident of Mountain View,
on Mar 4, 2022 at 7:54 am

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> "It is unfortunate that other Asian-American ethnicities also have to bear the brunt of these verbal and physical hostilities as they have absolutely no connection with the Mandarin/PRC populace in the United States or their pro-China leanings."

A few months ago while shopping with my children at Walmart, a customer muttered, "Go back to China" in our presence and we are of Filipino descent.

And while we must consider the source and ignorance of the commenter, this kind of incident had never occured prior to the pandemic, China's staged military maneuvers against Taiwan, or the recent Beijing Olympics.


Posted by Jason Wong, a resident of another community,
on Mar 4, 2022 at 11:00 am

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If Eileen Gu had been a true American she would have competed for the U.S. Winter Olympic Team and denounced the People's 'Republic' of China at press conferences citing the persecution of Uighur Muslims and China's unwarranted military agression towards Taiwan (where my relatives are from).

She is no national hero, except to PRC President Xi Jumping and his propaganda.


Posted by Roberta Lange, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 4, 2022 at 1:43 pm

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* ..."PRC President Xi Jumping [sic] and his propaganda."

Isn't his name "Jinping" rather than "Jumping" as in 'Jumping Jack Flash' by The Rolling Stones?

No big deal as the Taiwanese and Mandarin dialects are entirely different.

* "It is worth noting that Russia and Belarus have now been banned from the para Olympics...It is a good move that they are not allowed to compete."

The Para Olympics are also being held in Beijing the last time I checked.

Hopefully these competitive events will not be as political or contrived as the last one held in Beijing.

Will China utilize another token Uighur to carry the torch during the opening ceremonies?


Posted by Akio Morikawa, a resident of another community,
on Mar 5, 2022 at 9:20 am

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While some Americans are calling both Eileen Gu and Zhu Yi traitors for renouncing their American citizenship and competing for China, perhaps it is best to simply view them as American-born pro-Chinese nationals driven by inherent self-interests who are no longer American citizens by any sense of the word or personal loyalties.

And chance are they never were.




Posted by Jacob Zhao, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 5, 2022 at 1:15 pm

Jacob Zhao is a registered user.

"Go easy on Ms. Gu as she is merely a highly talented adolescent puppet for her Tiger Mother whose apparent allegiances rest with the People's Republic of China."

^ A Tiger Mother is no different than an American 'Stage Mother' promoting the career of a child actor in Hollywood (or on Broadway) by any means possible.

Such hypocracy to point fingers at others!


Posted by Regis Wong, a resident of another community,
on Mar 6, 2022 at 3:27 pm

Regis Wong is a registered user.

An exception to this discussion is Olympic Gold medalist Nathan Chen who hails from Salt Lake City and whose parents are from the People's Republic of China.

Unlike ingrate Eileen Gu and name-changer Zhu Yi, Nathan Chen competed for the United States.

Welcome back to America Nathan and congratulations on your accomplishment!

Gu and Yi will always be viewed with suspicion for they are no longer Americans as witnessed by their citizenship renouncements and turncoat participation in the Beijing Olympics.

They are not to be trusted or admired.


Posted by Robin Jacobs, a resident of another community,
on Mar 7, 2022 at 11:45 am

Robin Jacobs is a registered user.

° "They are not to be trusted or admired."

At the University of California at San Diego, a Chinese "researcher" from the People's Republic of China was recently expelled for spying having been uncovered as a member of the Chinese Academy of Surveying & Mapping which is a information gathering network for the Chinese 'civilian space program' which is actually China's military space program.

Given the covert measures of Russia and China, the United States needs to tighten up its bilateral sharing of scientific documentation and research.

Both countries are striving to destroy America and can never be trusted.


Posted by Red Baker, a resident of Old Palo Alto,
on Mar 8, 2022 at 9:46 am

Red Baker is a registered user.

[Post removed.]


Posted by Lee Tran, a resident of another community,
on Mar 8, 2022 at 11:21 am

Lee Tran is a registered user.

In San Jose, several of my friends have endured verbal insults after being mistakenly identified as immigrants from Red China due to the pandemic.

[Portion removed.]


Posted by Vinob Singh, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 8, 2022 at 12:29 pm

Vinob Singh is a registered user.

"...a customer muttered, "Go back to China" in our presence and we are of Filipino descent."

"In San Jose, several of my friends have endured verbal insults after being mistakenly identified as immigrants from Red China due to the pandemic."

Though East Indians are considered Asian due to geographic proximities, I am grateful that my people are not mistaken for the Mandarin Chinese as India is a sworn enemy of the People's Republic of China due to boundary disputes.

My Taiwanese co-workers also echo my sentiments as their homeland is also under seige by the ruthless Jinping regime.

Unless the newly arrived immigrants from the PRC swear total allegiance to the United States, they cannot be trusted by any means of the word.

"Americans of the heart VS Americans by paper."

^ This is the true litmus test.





Posted by Lenny Chao, a resident of another community,
on Mar 8, 2022 at 4:09 pm

Lenny Chao is a registered user.

There is no real unity within the Asian community because of all the various Asian ethnicities and their different cultural and geo-political backgrounds.


Posted by Wes Taylor, a resident of Mountain View,
on Mar 9, 2022 at 9:32 am

Wes Taylor is a registered user.

Xenophobia in America is primarily being directed towards those who hail from the PRC stemming from geo-political-economic conflicts and the recent pandemic.

Unfortunately, other Asian ethnicities have been caught in the crossfire due to perceived appearances.

The Mandarin immigrants who have chosen to reside in the United States need to vociferously denounce the People's Republic of China and its global policies in order to cool things down.


Posted by Len Donnely, a resident of Embarcadero Oaks/Leland,
on Mar 9, 2022 at 11:37 am

Len Donnely is a registered user.

"The Mandarin immigrants who have chosen to reside in the United States need to vociferously denounce the People's Republic of China and its global policies in order to cool things down."

^ That is not going to happen anytime soon given the scope of this discussion pertaining to Olympic team loyalties.


Posted by Soo Kim, a resident of Menlo Park,
on Mar 10, 2022 at 9:37 am

Soo Kim is a registered user.

As a third generation Korean American I am appalled at the overall lack of Americanization on the part of countless resituated Mandarins from the People's Republic of China.

Instead it is being suggested (by some) that American citizens and their children learn the Mandarin language rather than the other way around.

Most Korean, Japanese, Vietnamese, and Cantonese Americans have never promoted this type of language advocacy because the majority of them are fully assimilated into American culture and its practices. And this perspective comes with being a true American citizen.

Promoting wide-scale Mandarin language courses in public schools will only alienate more American citizens who already harbor a resentment towards the military, economic, and political aspirations of the PRC.

As another poster noted, it is time for many Mandarin expatriots to step-up by denouncing the PRC and its association with Russia.

The Beijing Olympics were a mere petri dish reflecting the true affiliations of those who renounce their American citizenship and compete for sworn enemies of the United States.

As American citizens, we must work together in order to build a better America rather than destroying it from behind the scenes.

I am proud to be an American citizen of South Korean descent as are the other members of my family.

The same cannot be said of certain others.


Posted by Willa Denkins, a resident of Portola Valley,
on Mar 10, 2022 at 12:12 pm

Willa Denkins is a registered user.

Many 1st generation immigrants tend to have a loyalty to their native country.

It is up to the ensuing generations who are now American citizens to prove otherwise.

Eileen Gu and Zhu Li are obviously un-American turncoats


Posted by Chase Longmire, a resident of Los Altos,
on Mar 10, 2022 at 1:08 pm

Chase Longmire is a registered user.

"It should also be noted that during the Jordan Middle School renaming, it was the Mandarin parents who vehemently protested the name change to Fred Yamamoto (a native-born son of Palo Alto Japanese-American parents who was killed as an enlisted U.S. serviceman during WW2)."

What were they thinking?

Fred Yamamoto was a Japanese American from Palo Alto and of no direct relation to Admiral Yamamoto of the Japanese Imperial Navy during World War Two.

Talk about ignorance. [Portion removed.]


Posted by Jon Harris, a resident of Leland Manor/Garland Drive,
on Mar 11, 2022 at 9:03 am

Jon Harris is a registered user.

>"...a customer muttered, "Go back to China" in our presence and we are of Filipino descent."

>>"Xenophobia in America is primarily being directed towards those who hail from the PRC stemming from geo-political-economic conflicts and the recent pandemic.

Unfortunately, other Asian ethnicities have been caught in the crossfire due to perceived appearances."

^ Which is why many people need to further familiarize themselves with the differences between the various Asian cultures, ethnicities, and languages.

Any personal or political contempt towards the Mandarin populace should not be taken out on others.


Posted by Philomena Tang, a resident of Los Altos,
on Mar 11, 2022 at 11:16 am

Philomena Tang is a registered user.

"I hope we can also become more understanding of the alienation that recent or second generation immigrants face when having to decide between their old roots and their new ones."

This alienation can be easily resolved by embracing one's ethnic culture and background while affirming allegiance and assimilating to one's new country.

Otherwise stay home.


Posted by Franklin Towers, a resident of another community,
on Mar 11, 2022 at 3:18 pm

Franklin Towers is a registered user.

Richard Nixon should never have established diplomatic relations with Red China & he supposedly did it to serve as a protective buffer between the United States & the USSR.

Big joke as both the PRC & modern Russia are bedmates and venerable enemies of the United States.

This eventually opened up lucrative trade opportunities for puppet master Deng Xiaoping to exploit & saturate the global consumer market with cheaply manufactured goods which in turn created numerous Chinese millionaires operating a countless number of low-paying sweatshops.

In other words, these Chinese manufacturing entrepreneurs exploited their own people and took it to the bank.

Then they migrated to America en masse with their extensive wealth so it is understandable that they have no allegiance to the United States.

The rest is history.


Posted by Ashley, a resident of Downtown North,
on Mar 13, 2022 at 9:57 am

Ashley is a registered user.

If someone is a true American (and not merely one on paper or for relocation conveniences), supporting the likes of despotic Russia or Communist China is questionable.


Posted by Butch Logan, a resident of Old Palo Alto,
on Mar 14, 2022 at 9:29 am

Butch Logan is a registered user.

>"There is no real unity within the Asian community because of all the various Asian ethnicities and their different cultural and geo-political backgrounds."

This appears to be the case based on the various disavowels by other long-established members of the Asian community.


Posted by Bobby Montenegro, a resident of Mountain View,
on Mar 14, 2022 at 11:37 am

Bobby Montenegro is a registered user.

What happens in China should stay in China including the pandemic and turncoat Olympic athletes.

And any PRC national residing in the United States who supports the wrongful takeover of Taiwan should be deported.


Posted by Madison Lake, a resident of another community,
on Mar 14, 2022 at 1:53 pm

Madison Lake is a registered user.

There were many 1st generation Japanese immigrants (Issei) who privately supported expansionist Imperial Japan in sentiment and through their donations to the Japanese military effort.

Their American born children (Nissei) for the most part were loyal and fully assimilated American citizens who got caught between a rock and a hard place because many were minors and were forced to accompany their parents to the internment camps.

It is OK to imprison non-U.S. citizens (i.e. Muslims suspected of terrorism) for suspected crimes against America but the charges must be proven.

Constitutional rights do not apply to non-US citizens which is why Guantanamo Bay was justified post 9/11.


Posted by Laramie Johnson, a resident of Stanford,
on Mar 15, 2022 at 10:28 am

Laramie Johnson is a registered user.

• "who do I cheer for in the Olympics?"

You cheer for whoever you want.


Posted by Justine Meadows, a resident of another community,
on Mar 16, 2022 at 2:50 pm

Justine Meadows is a registered user.

I cheer for the best athletes regardless of their ethnicity or political alignments.

Eileen Gu was outstanding regardless of what country she was representing.

Zhu Li on the other hand, was a complete flop and scorned by the PRC attendees and media as a total embarrassment to her newly designated country.

Oh well.


Posted by Chris Carter, a resident of another community,
on Mar 17, 2022 at 11:29 am

Chris Carter is a registered user.

[Post removed.]


Posted by Wesley Townsend, a resident of another community,
on Mar 17, 2022 at 1:07 pm

Wesley Townsend is a registered user.

When or if the People's Republic of China
ever decides to conquer Taiwan, the true battle lines will be drawn between the recently immigrated Mandarin Chinese and longstanding American citizens at which point it would be prudent for the Mandarins (regardless of American citizenship) to denounce the PRC as a ruthless agressor.

Hopefully the PRC will respect Taiwan sovereignty and leave the Taiwanese alone.


Posted by Jeremy Tran, a resident of another community,
on Mar 18, 2022 at 11:39 am

Jeremy Tran is a registered user.

Why should loyal Asian Americans be taking the heat for Mandarin-related transgressions?

The recent anti-Asian hate crimes are being based on the pandemic and China's ongoing efforts to expand their global and economic sphere of influence.

And anyone who fully supports the PRC should consider returning to their homeland.


Posted by Misha Abramowitz, a resident of another community,
on Mar 20, 2022 at 11:14 am

Misha Abramowitz is a registered user.

Red China and Russia are reincarnations of the Hitler regime.

May the leaders of both countries burn in hell.


Posted by Jim Takamoto, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 20, 2022 at 11:49 am

Jim Takamoto is a registered user.

The difference between Japanese technology and China technology is that the Japanese reverse engineer and improve technological devices.

The Chinese opt to steal technological advancements then they create cheaply-made replaceable consumer goods at a far lower price.

That is how they got rich.

No sense of shame or integrity.


Posted by Pete Blass, a resident of another community,
on Mar 21, 2022 at 11:33 am

Pete Blass is a registered user.

I would rather cheer for a Chinese national rather than a transgendered male to female competing in the women's events.


Posted by Adrian LaPierre, a resident of another community,
on Mar 23, 2022 at 11:33 am

Adrian LaPierre is a registered user.

Transitioned male athletes competing as women should have exclusive athletic events reserved for transgenders only to ensure a level playing field.


Posted by Penny Wilcox, a resident of another community,
on Mar 23, 2022 at 1:09 pm

Penny Wilcox is a registered user.

Yes...as in the Special Olympics, there should be specialized NCAA and Olympic sanctioned athletic events sole for non-binary athletes.

Imagine if Bruce/Caitlin Jenner had transitioned prior to winning the Olympic men's decathlon.

His/her records would stand for centuries.


Posted by Michael Bennett, a resident of Stanford,
on Mar 27, 2022 at 10:04 am

Michael Bennett is a registered user.

"I would rather cheer for a Chinese national than a transgendered male to female competing in the women's events."

All transgenders should be banned from participating in previously established binary differentiated athletic competitions.


Posted by Kerry Robertson, a resident of Stanford,
on Mar 28, 2022 at 11:21 am

Kerry Robertson is a registered user.

The 2022 Beijing Olympics and its censorship was rivaled only by the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

Despotic countries like modern day China and Russia should never be allowed to host the Olympics because they are anti-humanity.


Posted by Larry Berg, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 30, 2022 at 11:01 am

Larry Berg is a registered user.

Hopefully the PRC will never opt to annex Taiwan but if they decide to do so, any Mandarin Chinese residents supporting such a brutal measure should be immediately deported back to China.

As for the transgender movement and its advocacy, acceptance of others (including the homeless) who deviate from societal norms is paramount even though they may be mentally ill.


Posted by Jason Tang, a resident of Stanford,
on Mar 31, 2022 at 2:52 pm

Jason Tang is a registered user.

Acceptance and ensuring the civil rights of all transgenders and members of the LGBTQ community is paramount BUT transgendered males to females competing in women's athletic events should be banned in competitive events such as swimming, tennis, golf, cycling, and track & field.

The transgender athletes should have their own designated athletic events.


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