Indoor Fun Part 2 | Toddling Through the Silicon Valley | Cheryl Bac | Palo Alto Online |

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Toddling Through the Silicon Valley

By Cheryl Bac

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About this blog: I'm a wife, stay-at-home mom, home cook, marathon runner, and PhD. I recently moved to the Silicon Valley after completing my PhD in Social Psychology and becoming a mother one month apart. Before that, I ran seven marathons incl...  (More)

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Indoor Fun Part 2

Uploaded: Feb 13, 2019
With all of the rain, we had an opportunity to try out more science experiments. We hope you enjoy them as much as we did. My aunt and uncle gifted us a bubble kit this fall. We decided to put it to the test and had a ton of fun. Obviously bubbles are a quite messy indoor activity, but if you are in the right mindset, they can be lots of fun.

1. Bubble inside a bubble: Blowing a bubble inside a bubble worked great for us because our two older kids could do it on the kitchen counter independently. They enjoyed making their own creations and asking me to photograph them before they popped.



2. Square bubble: We didn't have quite enough bubble solution to completely submerge our straw structure, so I had to get creative to make this activity work. Next time I'll make double the amount of bubble solution for this activity and we'll do it outdoors.



3. Frozen bubbles: During the polar vortex I asked my parents if they could try to get bubbles to freeze. They were very kind and braved the outdoors for us only to discover it was too windy for the frozen bubbles to last. We also tried making frozen bubbles in our freezer with little success. Next time we are playing in the snow, I'm going to bring along some bubble solution just in case it is a windless day.

4. Bubble snake: This activity is really not an indoor one, but we just couldn't wait to try it. We actually ended up with some much bubble solution on the floor that it became both extremely slippery and and sticky. Lesson learned.

5. Bouncing bubbles: Our favorite bubble activity by far was bouncing bubbles. I highly recommend this experiment. Honestly, I was quite skeptical and didn't expect to be able to bounce bubbles. But with extra strong bubble solution, we were able to bounce our bubbles a handful of times before they popped. It did take some practice, but this activity ended up being less messy than I expected because we focused on bouncing one bubble at a time.
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