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Town Square

Small wonders: using books, front yards to foster neighborliness

Original post made on Mar 24, 2013

Little Free Libraries -- imagine giant bird houses -- are owned and operated by the residents who've erected them. Full of a few dozen to a hundred or more books, they are part of a grassroots movement in sharing. Passersby are welcome to borrow a book and return it -- or just take it and bring a different one back.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Sunday, March 24, 2013, 10:38 AM

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Posted by great idea
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Mar 24, 2013 at 3:48 pm

The first thing that comes to mind is that people would steal the books (why you have to have an account at the city library to check out books). However, this does not seem to be happening and is probably unique in the way it has been implemented. Everyone in such a (relatively) tight knit community sees the greater value of having a simple roof over these books than personal gain of abusing the system. Dong also states that parenting books were added to the collection (assuming that these were put by readers, not 'owners' of the library). Now the books have a second (or n+1 th) chance at inspiring a child or parent rather than being left in the attic or recycled. Doubt this would work in most other communities since it requires the right environment and geographical layout of the neighborhood.


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Posted by so glad to see It
a resident of Midtown
on Mar 25, 2013 at 6:09 pm

this movement has been welcomed in many places.

see this article in the Kirkland reporter about he movement in the Seattle area


Web Link


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Posted by Brit
a resident of Palo Verde
on Mar 25, 2013 at 6:28 pm

These are happening all over the place. In Britain the trend is to use old telephone booth kiosks Web Link