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Boy's death sparks blood donations

Original post made on Feb 21, 2013

The death of a 10-year-old boy from complications following influenza has sparked a request from his family for local donations of the blood type, O-negative.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Thursday, February 21, 2013, 8:47 AM

Comments (10)

Posted by LongTimeDonor, a resident of Mountain View
on Feb 21, 2013 at 10:21 am

As an O- donor for over 30 years, I will add my voice; please donate!
It isn't difficult. It only hurts a little. But it saves lives.
Stanford is the best blood bank, with comfortable facilities and the best medical staff. (Not to mention really good cookies).

My condolences to the family of Joshua - he sounds like a great kid. Hopefully this plea will save the life of another child.


Posted by robit noops, a resident of Greenmeadow
on Feb 21, 2013 at 12:25 pm

When I gave blood at CSU Chico, I got free bowling tickets, a t-shirt, free cd, and hackie sack. Stanford blood center, please step it up a notch.


Posted by Hmmm, a resident of East Palo Alto
on Feb 21, 2013 at 12:31 pm

Did Joshua have a 'flu shot?


Posted by Jozee, a resident of Palo Verde
on Feb 21, 2013 at 12:36 pm

My son has been donating blood since he turned 18 years of age. He is now 22 years old. He does it with GOOD intentions NOT for what he receives. He goes to the STANFORD BLOOD CENTER. They are great. He has gotten the same as you ....robit noops.Im so sorry for this familys loss.


Posted by Little Dorrit, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Feb 21, 2013 at 3:21 pm

My niece gives regularly, and is called upon often, to the point that she sometimes gets anemic ( she is O - ). She has also donated platelets, although that can have severe reactions, such as vomiting. It is important to know, because they do not usually tell you, that it takes two weeks for your body to replace that pint you gave, and during that time you must NOT drink alcohol! The lower volume of blood means the alcohol affects far worse on far less.

They often do not tell you that before and after donating, you need to load up on iron, which has consequences of its own. There are several medications that can also make you indelible as a donor.


Posted by George , a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Feb 21, 2013 at 4:44 pm

I am puzzled by the statements about blood type compatibility. The following chart gives the ability of the different blood types (using the ABO typing system). Unfortunately instead of a green or red check mark, the words "green tick" and "red X" are used instead which makes it harder to follow. Tick means okay, X means forbidden. Go to your browser and type in "blood types" for a better view.

Because there are >30 different antigens, this may affect the compatibility and is not covered in this chart.

Red blood cell compatibility

Blood group AB individuals have both A and B antigens on the surface of their RBCs, and their blood plasma does not contain any antibodies against either A or B antigen. Therefore, an individual with type AB blood can receive blood from any group (with AB being preferable), but cannot donate blood to either A or B group. They are known as universal recipients.
Blood group A individuals have the A antigen on the surface of their RBCs, and blood serum containing IgM antibodies against the B antigen. Therefore, a group A individual can receive blood only from individuals of groups A or O (with A being preferable), and can donate blood to individuals with type A or AB.
Blood group B individuals have the B antigen on the surface of their RBCs, and blood serum containing IgM antibodies against the A antigen. Therefore, a group B individual can receive blood only from individuals of groups B or O (with B being preferable), and can donate blood to individuals with type B or AB.
Blood group O (or blood group zero in some countries) individuals do not have either A or B antigens on the surface of their RBCs, but their blood serum contains IgM anti-A and anti-B antibodies against the A and B blood group antigens. Therefore, a group O individual can receive blood only from a group O individual, but can donate blood to individuals of any ABO blood group (i.e., A, B, O or AB). If a patient in a hospital situation were to need a blood transfusion in an emergency, and if the time taken to process the recipient's blood would cause a detrimental delay, O Negative blood can be issued. They are known as universal donors.

Red blood cell compatibility chart
In addition to donating to the same blood group; type O blood donors can give to A, B and AB; blood donors of types A and B can give to AB.
Red blood cell compatibility table[61][62] Recipient[1] Donor[1]
O− O+ A− A+ B− B+ AB− AB+
O− Green tick Red X Red X Red X Red X Red X Red X Red X
O+ Green tick Green tick Red X Red X Red X Red X Red X Red X
A− Green tick Red X Green tick Red X Red X Red X Red X Red X
A+ Green tick Green tick Green tick Green tick Red X Red X Red X Red X
B− Green tick Red X Red X Red X Green tick Red X Red X Red X
B+ Green tick Green tick Red X Red X Green tick Green tick Red X Red X
AB− Green tick Red X Green tick Red X Green tick Red X Green tick Red X
AB+ Green tick Green tick Green tick Green tick Green tick Green tick Green tick Green tick

Table note
1. Assumes absence of atypical antibodies that would cause an incompatibility between donor and recipient blood, as is usual for blood selected by cross matching.


Posted by Cannot be a donor anymore, a resident of Midtown
on Feb 21, 2013 at 5:35 pm

After having certain medical conditions (ex. cancer ), one may no longer be allowed to donate blood or platelets. I am in that category, unfortunately.


Posted by Can't donate, a resident of Midtown
on Feb 21, 2013 at 8:48 pm

I would love to donate but since I travelled to the UK a lot during certain window of time (can't remember the exact window the Blood Center specified), I was essentially rejected. Apparently this is because I may be, albeit unknowingly, carrying the foot and mouth disease. Seems like no one has figured out how to separate those who are / aren't carriers, I would love to donate and do my part otherwise.

The bone marrow agency I registered with didn't ask anything about my past travels, and I do have the donor sticker on my DL (and have informed my family of my wishes). Seems like only blood donation is concerned with my UK travels.


Posted by Why?, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Feb 22, 2013 at 7:55 am

Why did Joshua not get a flu shot? Why was he not given Tamiflu?


Posted by Rose, a resident of another community
on Feb 22, 2013 at 9:48 am

I am 0- and was turned down from donating due to the fact that my RHR (resting heat rate was too low. I think this is wrong if you are a healthy individual. My physician even wrote a note to the blood bank that I was healthy and should be able to donate especially since I was 0-.


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