Town Square

Post a New Topic

San Jose's School District Goes Solar: THIS is Municipal Innovation

Original post made by Mike on Jul 25, 2007

Web Link

Here's San Jose's Schools District being SMART, and INNOVATIVE. Just look at the commercial partners: Bank of America and Shell (probably others, too).

THIS is the kind of thing we need to see more of in Palo Alto, a city that has been resting on the laurels of PAST innovative hegemony.

The PAUSD BOE and our policy-makers - including senior staff at city hall should look at this as a lead in to similar projects. THIS is what I mean by "aggresive business development".

Someone in San Jose had BIG idea, and made it work. Kudos!

I want to see more of this sort of thing in Palo Alto.

We have a lot on our plate; we're behind in infrastructure spending; we're looking for new revenues to bolster our schools - and so on. It's ideas like this one, in Sna Jose, that LEVERAGE EXISTING SOCIAL AND CAPITAL INFRASTRUCTURE that we need to see more of.

Congratulations, San Jose!



Comments (19)

Posted by qq, a resident of Barron Park
on Jul 25, 2007 at 6:51 pm

Web Link

They could save a lot more by just putting a nuclear power plant in downtown San Jose.

Web Link


Posted by Mike, a resident of College Terrace
on Jul 25, 2007 at 7:12 pm

qq,

Web Link

caveat emptor!


Posted by qq, a resident of Barron Park
on Jul 25, 2007 at 7:19 pm

Please Mike,

This is America. Do you really think we would buy some crappy 'Made in Japan' nuclear reactor? Hell no! We would get a nice, high quality, earthquake-proof, 'Made in China' reactor.

Get with the times.

qq


Posted by Mike, a resident of College Terrace
on Jul 25, 2007 at 10:03 pm

qq, A (Richter) 8.5 quake doesn't care where anything is made. Like Tony S. would say "it's physics, baby".


Posted by John, a resident of College Terrace
on Jul 25, 2007 at 11:26 pm


"A (Richter) 8.5 quake doesn't care where anything is made. Like Tony S. would say "it's physics, baby"."

Mike, Are you sure about that statement? Base islation methods have shown some pretty impressive results.

Web Link

A quote from the article:

"Isolation used in conventional nuclear plants greatly simplifies the expensive and time-consuming design and qualification of the equipment, piping, and supports for seismic loading. In addition, when seismic design criteria are increased due to the discovery of nearby faults, for example, the plant need not be redesigned; upgrading the isolation system is sufficient.

In an experimental program at EERC isolation bearings were designed, produced, and tested for two types of liquid metal reactor designs. The first, called PRISM, uses high-shape factor isolation bearings designed to provide horizontal isolation only. In the other design, SAFR, the reactor is supported on low-shape bearings that provide both horizontal and vertical isolation. The results of this test series extended the range of the isolator types with well-understood characteristics. "

I wouldn't suggest straddling the San Andreas falut with a major nuke, but right next to it would be OK.

Nuclear power is the only realistic source of energy (base load) going forward. Time to start building that infrastructure.


Posted by Mike, a resident of College Terrace
on Jul 26, 2007 at 9:37 am

John, I'm well aware if the program at EERC; I'm also well aware of the subsoil stresses of a quake over 8.0. No matter what you do in a lab, there is nothing we know of that will guarantee that we wouldn't have a disaster.

I would rather not gamble, and risk the literal future of this region. What's the half life of nuclear fuel again? Imagine a serious leak after a quake, when emergency personnel are unable to contain it.

Figure out a way to come up with power alternatives, or conserve, or both. Nukes are not going to be built in California, not once the public gets wind of what the potentail for disaster is.

In any case, congratulations to Sann Jose for its innovative move; we need to see more of that kind of thinking throughout the Valley, and America.


Posted by John, a resident of College Terrace
on Jul 26, 2007 at 9:53 am

"Figure out a way to come up with power alternatives, or conserve, or both. Nukes are not going to be built in California, not once the public gets wind of what the potentail for disaster is."

Mike, the only reliable base load sources of electricity are dammed rivers, fossil fuels or nuclear. Wind and solar are not base load producers. Fossil fuels have a heavy carbon footprint. We have already nearly maxed out our power productions from hydro in California, unless we want to build a bunch of new dams.

Conservation will not solve the problem, though it will help a little bit. The booming population of Calif. will demand nuclear, Mike. You cannot stop it, even with your scare tactics.


Posted by Mike, a resident of College Terrace
on Jul 26, 2007 at 1:23 pm

You choose:

Potential semi-permanent abandonment of California (for centuries) if nuke plant fries during an 8.0+ quake OR looking for other ways (some not yet discovered) to deal with energy shortages.

So who needs to get with the times?


Posted by John, a resident of College Terrace
on Jul 26, 2007 at 11:10 pm

Mike,

U.S. nuclear plants have proven to be quite safe. Containment buildings are designed to 'contain' the problem, as they did at Three Mile Island (unlike Chernobyl, which had no cantainment building). Modern designs are built to default to a safety condition (some older designs required active procedures to gain a safe condition). Base isolation is a significant safety improvement for seismically active areas.

The real threat to California is a shortage of clean power going forward. Your scare tactics will not stop it, because there IS no other answer, at this point. Fusion is still a long way off.


Posted by Walter_E_Wallis, a resident of Midtown
on Jul 27, 2007 at 7:42 pm

You might even want to check the reality of Chernobyl casualties against the predictions. Most of the Chrenobyl deaths were caused by mining the coal to replace the lost generating capability.


Posted by GiveMeABreak, a resident of another community
on Jul 27, 2007 at 11:23 pm

That's total BS, Walt! Did you hear that from Heil Hannity???


Posted by Walter_E_Wallis, a resident of Midtown
on Jul 28, 2007 at 7:18 am

I was a student of energy production before Hannity was born. What is the death toll now? 38 or 39? where is the statistical verification of more cancers, more deaths from associated causes? Why are the bunnies hopping around the abandoned Chernobyl farms not growing wings?
Thank you, Gimme, for proving a little ignorance goes a long way.


Posted by Good job Walter!, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 28, 2007 at 8:19 am

Walter, stop confusing us with facts.


Posted by Aaron, a resident of Palo Alto Hills
on Jul 28, 2007 at 8:43 am

Chernobyl is a wildlife haven, and has been proposed as a national park.

Web Link

Chernobyl might also serve as a national repository for all the nuclear power plant radioactive waste in Russia. Imagine that, a national park on top, with flourishing wildlife, and nuclear wastes under the ground.


Posted by glow worm, a resident of Adobe-Meadows
on Jul 28, 2007 at 10:54 am

How long ago did Chernobyl happen? Not long enough to be able to gauge long-term damage at the micro-level (germ cell, etc.)

btw, "lige foes on", which maens that things can live right alongside nuclear contaminated plots.

Walt, here's a test. Would you move to a Chernobyl-like area in the US with your family - including grandchildren - following a nuclear accident? Just wondering.

No matter what any of you self appointed experts say, there is NO WAY that any nuke plant has ever been tested in Richter 8.0+ conditions.

Anyone wanting to make that gamble can sign up to live in the contaminated area, Put your money - and life - where your mouth is.

It's always amusing to see the armchair faux-heroes come out when we talk about nuke plants in California.


Posted by Aaron, a resident of Palo Alto Hills
on Jul 28, 2007 at 11:10 am

The community surrounding Three Mile Island is thriving, due to high wage jobs provided by the plant. If someone tried to shut down that plant, there would be protests by the parents with young kids, because Daddy might be out of a good job.

The closed off area around Chernobyl is about 30 km, hardly an entire state. If there had been a containment building, the closed area would be much smaller, perhaps nothing outside the containment building.

I would gladly live next to a nuclear power plant of modern design. My grandchildren might even get good jobs at the plant.

Scare mongering will not, in the end, overcome the need for nuclear power plants. Those who cannot think rationally will just need to move to another region.


Posted by Walter_E_Wallis, a resident of Midtown
on Jul 28, 2007 at 1:25 pm

I might want to check the background readings, but then, would you and your grandchildren live somewhere the background radiation was twice what it is here? Like Denver?
As for long term, as Walter Reuther used to say in the long term we are all dead.
There is no way our civilization can survive without plentiful affordable energy. You want to live where you have 2 hours of elecricity and water a day? That will kill you a damn sight quicker than radiation.


Posted by Bike Yoriko Bike, Good Biker.., a resident of Community Center
on Jul 31, 2007 at 4:59 am

The problem of Energy in US is described in one example below:

"Shops in Stanford Mall are required to keep their doors open even when air-conditioners are operating"

Yoriko... you need to bike a lot more you are not saving enough !!

Bike Yoriko Bike, Good Biker..


Posted by Walter_E_Wallis, a resident of Midtown
on Aug 2, 2007 at 5:19 pm

Closing the doors would have no significant effect on A/C loads since a minimum percent of outside air always has to be brought in anyway, by code.


If you were a member and logged in you could track comments from this story.

Post a comment

Posting an item on Town Square is simple and requires no registration. Just complete this form and hit "submit" and your topic will appear online. Please be respectful and truthful in your postings so Town Square will continue to be a thoughtful gathering place for sharing community information and opinion. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

We prefer that you use your real name, but you may use any "member" name you wish.

Name: *

Select your neighborhood or school community: * Not sure?

Comment: *

Verification code: *
Enter the verification code exactly as shown, using capital and lowercase letters, in the multi-colored box.

*Required Fields

Palo Alto quietly gets new evening food truck market
By Elena Kadvany | 4 comments | 3,617 views

See Me. Hear Me. Donít Fix Me.
By Chandrama Anderson | 2 comments | 1,806 views

Foothills Park: a world away
By Sally Torbey | 11 comments | 1,608 views

Universal Language
By Cheryl Bac | 2 comments | 1,388 views

Two Days to Save This Dog?
By Cathy Kirkman | 10 comments | 648 views