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Stanford admits 6.6 percent for Class of 2016

Original post made on Mar 30, 2012

Stanford University sent notification letters Friday, March 30, to high school students around the world on its admission decisions for the undergraduate Class of 2016.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Friday, March 30, 2012, 4:23 PM

Comments (8)

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Posted by anne
a resident of Atherton
on Mar 30, 2012 at 9:56 pm

It sounds like a boring student body. Why doesn't Standford become more heterogeneous?


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Posted by Bob
a resident of Crescent Park
on Mar 30, 2012 at 10:36 pm

Give me a break Anne. Any parent or student admitted to Stanford should be extremely proud of their accomplishments. The admissions department appears inspired to build a diverse and brilliant student body. Beat Cal.


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Posted by JackieTreehorn
a resident of Midtown
on Mar 31, 2012 at 1:20 am

Congrats. Welcome to the road more traveled. Ah, safety.


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Posted by Marie
a resident of another community
on Apr 2, 2012 at 12:51 pm

What's boring about being admitted to a college you applied to i the hopes of being a part of that community? The competitive nature of the college app process is nerve wracking for the best students-How about a big applause for all who applied (most were probably qualified academically!) and a thumbs up for those fortunate enough to get in?
Gees, a little pride in the next generation please...


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Posted by mom and teacher
a resident of Greenmeadow
on Apr 2, 2012 at 1:06 pm

After going through the app. process with my daughter (now at a UC) I think universities like Stanford need to make applicants aware of their odds. I spent $60 over and over again for my daughter to apply for colleges. What a waste. Be upfront universities about GPA, legacies and a kid's REAL chance of getting into your institution. I can't help but think Stanford and institutions of its ilk profit from that app. fee, leading kids on just to make a buck.


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Posted by neighbor
a resident of another community
on Apr 2, 2012 at 2:24 pm

The college application process is grueling....and rejection is a very difficult experience, especially when a candidate is extremely qualified. Note that just about all applicants to Stanford, especially local ones, are "extremely qualified," but they admit students based on many factors and applicants must qualify academically.

The applicants know the odds of admittance to top universities before submitting their applications. Nevertheless, they apply to multiple universities -- as they should!

Each institution has different priorities, scholarships, etc. and they will be accepted at one or more institutions of their choice. And...perhaps the rejection by a university is a valuable lesson as a child moves into adulthood. Life has both rewards and rejections.

Your $60 did not make Stanford rich. They spent that many times over reviewing your daughter's application.


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Posted by neighbor
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Apr 2, 2012 at 4:48 pm

check back later for how many they take off their waitlist.


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Posted by neighbor
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Apr 2, 2012 at 5:01 pm

There is a trend to apply to a whole bunch of universities if you can afford it - that is the type often applying to Stanford.

I wonder about the role of the recruited team athlete at Stanford. While I am not a sports expert, I attended a sport event at Stanford this year (that was otherwise enjoyable) except for the fact I was inflicted with some stunning behavior by (other Stanford team) athletes sitting behind us. I am not certain what team they were from. Aside from one guy being quite ill and sneezing, coughing loudly all over us, he was rude and loud and flat out boorish. Err - not the sophisticated, high-achieving academic type at all. I think most of all the athlete buds were Caucasians.
In fact at the half (it was not football, incidentally) I insisted to my family that we move. It wasn't an issue of them cheering on their Stanford team on the field - I know some supporters can be over the top on that.
The boorish athletes (who also contacted various buds on their cells and we all nearby in the audience could hear their appalling discussions) were not part of the sport on the field, I want to make THAT clear since those athletes appeared normal - but they yelled sexist, appalling things down onto the field to one of the Stanford teammembers there (aside from criticizing some of the players on both teams...)
My real point is, I generally had the sense the athletes behind us were not students with high grade point averages. I know some universities are secretive about GPA's, majors, etc. of their athletes, but wow...I remember reading about a glorified football star who stated about heavy travel, not concentrating on coursework, taking a quarter off...it all sounds super luxurious at the expense of being a real student.
Take into account the acceptance rate - I assume fullride athletes are offered early/first - correct? - at a much lower entrance requirement - and THEN the regular academic applicants get their shot. With Stanford emphasizing sports so strongly, I think this is some sort of element in their admissions.


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