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Stanford admits 748 early applicants

Original post made on Dec 14, 2013

Stanford University sent acceptance letters Friday to 748 high school students who sought admission to the class of 2018 under the university's early admission program. The students were selected from 6,948 early admission candidates, the largest early application pool in Stanford's history.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Friday, December 13, 2013, 3:48 PM

Comments (14)

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Posted by Surprised
a resident of Palo Alto High School
on Dec 14, 2013 at 8:14 am

I am surprised...Stanford accepts 2210 and 1679 show up?

That means Stanford is rejected by 25% of it's winning applicants.

That doesn't seem very good...is this normal?


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Posted by De Vaux
a resident of Crescent Park
on Dec 14, 2013 at 8:35 am

This is not normal, but apparently more and more parents of applicants think that Stanford is a "party school" and diploma mill.

Having worked there previously, I know that they will keep kids in until they are eligible to graduate. I remember a student from Japan about ten years ago, who tested pretty well, could read English well, but could barely speak it or understand it when spoken to her. She could not write it well at all. At the time I left! she had been there six years and had to retake many classes.

My previous employer's daughter was accepted there, but her parents did not let her attend due to the "party" and drug-use reputation at the time. it is also not considered a particularly safe campus.


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Posted by Stanford Alumnus
a resident of another community
on Dec 14, 2013 at 8:47 am

These students have multiple acceptances from other academic powerhouses like Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Duke, Brown, MIT, Cal Tech, etc. So the student that accepts Stanford has rejected several of these universities, and the Student that accepts Harvard or Yale has likely rejected Stanford.

The rate of acceptance by admitted applicants is called the "yield rate," and this is the statistic that is tracked to indicate the success of universities that compete for the best and brightest students.

Rather than being rejected by 24%, Stanford was accepted by 76% of these students. See the following article on the respective yield rate from the class that was admitted in 2010. Stanford's yield rate has increases from 72% then to 76% now.

Web Link

The following article shows universities with the highest yield rates for 2013. I submit that of the top academic institutions in our country, Stanford stands out as having a remarkably high yield rate.

Web Link


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Posted by PalyParent
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Dec 14, 2013 at 10:48 am

@Surprised - Only Harvard has a higher yield rate than Stanford in the country. Of course Harvard is Harvard.

One does not simply reject Harvard's acceptance.


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Posted by danielle
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Dec 14, 2013 at 12:10 pm

Juilliard and Curtis also have higher yield rates than Stanford. Curtis also gives full scholarships to all attendees.


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Posted by Stanford Grad
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Dec 14, 2013 at 6:55 pm

I loved my time at Stanford, but I do think this incredible emphasis on "selectivity" and "yield rate" is a sad comment on our society. Nice to go to Harvard, the Stanford of the east, W's alma mater, Yale,, Princeton--it's accredited too. Or even Vanderbilt, the Harvard of the south. But we have many fine institutions in or country, and it would be so nice if we just let our kids find a good match and develop themselves to their highest potential. Instead, we make them feel like failures if they don't win the empyrean university lottery.

Palo Alto would be better off if we parents put less pressure on our kids, and concentrated on giving them space to grow into fully developed and thoughtful human beings.






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Posted by Tennyson avenue resident
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Dec 14, 2013 at 7:14 pm

"This is not normal, but apparently more and more parents of applicants think that Stanford is a "party school" and diploma mill.

Having worked there previously, I know that they will keep kids in until they are eligible to graduate. I remember a student from Japan about ten years ago, who tested pretty well, could read English well, but could barely speak it or understand it when spoken to her. She could not write it well at all. At the time I left! she had been there six years and had to retake many classes.

My previous employer's daughter was accepted there, but her parents did not let her attend due to the "party" and drug-use reputation at the time. it is also not considered a particularly safe campus."

Party school, diploma mill???? Drug use?? Not a safe campus?
Anecdotes about others children????
How about some facts? This posting has a familiar feel.


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Posted by Stanford Grad
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Dec 14, 2013 at 7:45 pm

Stanford, party school and diploma mill. Who would want to go there? Gosh, Stanford students drink and earn degrees at a very high rate? Sounds like a party school and diploma mill to me. We didn't do any of that when I was there, of course.

You know, it's strange, one of my daughters went to Stanford as well, and did get a pretty good education. It's amazing, with all Stanford's faults, that that could happen.

Another daughter went to Pomona College. Good education there, too. Astonishing. I think Cal is accredited too. And SF State. I've known people who did well at UC Davis. It's really confusing sometimes. Are there even good universities and colleges in the midwest?

Be nice if we could get a little more real, and a lot less snooty, folks.


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Posted by James
a resident of Palo Alto Hills
on Dec 15, 2013 at 3:42 pm

De Vaux, I highly doubt you worked at Stanford. Everything (and I mean everything you posted) is false. Stanford's 78% yield rate is second in the nation to Harvard. Stanford's yield rate has been steadily going up for a very long time. [Portion removed.]


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Posted by Tennyson avenue resident
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Dec 15, 2013 at 3:50 pm

James -- good catch. De vaux's post sounded highly doubtful to me as well. A Japanese student who could not speak English accepted as an undergrad!!!!!!!! Stanford a. " diploma mill"!!!!! Bet you are are many many students who would live a diploma from this "mill" . Check what you need to get into Stanford and see that it is not a diploma mill. Amazing that someone could post that and think that people would believe it


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Posted by Another OPA Rez
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Dec 16, 2013 at 9:35 am

[Post removed.]


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Posted by Linda
a resident of Stanford
on Dec 17, 2013 at 12:49 pm

@Palyparent, I would certainly reject Harvard's acceptance. Even the best of schools are not for everyone, I would much rather go to UC Berkeley or Stanford and would choose those any day over Harvard.


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Posted by Stanford Alumnus
a resident of another community
on Dec 30, 2013 at 8:49 am

Daniellle wrote, "Juilliard and Curtis also have higher yield rates than Stanford."

There are many fine single subject institutes that are very narrow in their scope. Juilliard and Curtis excel at music education but neither is a "University." Universities must be both EDUCATIONAL and RESEARCH institutions of higher education that offer both bachelor and advanced degrees in multiple disciplines. There are very few universities that have the ability to offer the best education and research opportunities in many fields.

For a high school student that knows that his/her career will be as a professional musician, Juilliard is second to none. For me, I wanted to matriculate at a university that offered a broad undergraduate education and the best education in a number of possible majors.

The truth is that after graduation, most university graduates spend their life working in narrow field of expertise, but what makes life worth living are the values and education which the individual learned outside his university major. My major was in the sciences, but what I learned in philosophy, history, literature, language, art appreciation, etc. is what makes my life full.

Stanford is not the only institution that offers this level of education but for me, I cannot imagine having gone elsewhere.


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Posted by another pov
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Dec 30, 2013 at 9:18 am

Stanford Alumnus

"My major was in the sciences, but what I learned in philosophy, history, literature, language, art appreciation, etc. is what makes my life full."

Believe it or not, this can and does happen in hundreds of other universities. I did not attend Stanford, but if I had a choice, I would have wanted to go there because of the size, and location. Not too small, not too big, and California sunshine, it's extremely attractive. A drawback would have been the pressure to perform among so many brilliant students. I was a very good student, but not stratospherically good so I did well by being strong in a broader type of demographic.

Yield rates are just one of many competition measures, students are smart enough to know that their particular college fate will not be defined by only one measure of success.


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